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GENGO KENKYU (Journal of the Linguistic Society of Japan)
Vol. 1998 (1998) No. 113 P 63-95

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http://doi.org/10.11435/gengo1939.1998.113_63


The meaning of yon, one of the predicate verbs of Lhasa Tibetan, is analyzed in this paper. The result of the analysis shows that the yon has
the following meanings and usages;
1) Yon of retrospect
Yon of retrospect is used when the speaker describes the certain state of things based upon his familiarity with it through sufficient experiences to the hearer who has no or less knowledge about it.
Yon in this case denotes that the state of things was realized (or is realized) at the point of time away from the time of utterance, and/or at the place away from the place of utterance.
2) Yon of presupposition
Yon of presupposition is used when the speaker gives advance notice or warning based upon his familiarity with it through sufficient experiences to the hearer who has no or less knowledge about it that the certain state of things could happen at the point of time away from the time of utterance and/or at the place away from the place of utterance.
3) Yon of intention
Yon of intention is used when the speaker gives advance notice to the hearer that the speaker is intending to take a certain action to the hearer which could be realized at the point of time away from the time of utterance and/or at the place away from the place of utterance.
The meanings of the three usages of yon disclose that each usage has characteristics of its own, and that at the same time they also share the undermentioned common features;
a) Yon is used to describe the certain state of things which was realized (or is to be realized) at the point of time away from the time of utterance and/or at the place away from the place of utterance.
b) Yon denotes the hearer-oriented expression.

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