Hypertension Research
Clinical studies
White-Coat Hypertension Contributes to the Presence of Carotid Arteriosclerosis
Takao NAKASHIMAShigeru YAMANORie SASAKIShigetoshi MINAMIKazuhiro DOIJunko YAMAMOTOMinoru TAKAOKAYoshihiko SAITO
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Volume 27 (2004) Issue 10 Pages 739-745

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Abstract

It remains unclear whether white-coat hypertension is associated with vascular organ damage (e.g., carotid arteriosclerosis) in the same way sustained hypertension is. We therefore compared the progression of carotid arteriosclerosis among Japanese individuals showing normal blood pressures, sustained hypertension or white-coat hypertension. A total of 30 subjects (mean age, 58 years) with white-coat hypertension, 30 (mean age, 54 years) with untreated sustained hypertension who had no plaque formation in the carotid arteries, and 30 normotensive subjects (mean age, 58 years) were enrolled in this study. The white-coat and sustained hypertensive subjects were matched with respect to their clinical blood pressures, but their ambulatory blood pressures differed. Conversely, white-coat hypertensive and normotensive subjects were matched with respect to ambulatory blood pressures, but their clinical blood pressures differed. Carotid intimal-medial thickness was measured by B-mode ultrasonography, and the cross-sectional area of the common carotid artery was calculated. The three groups were similar with respect to age, sex ratio, height, laboratory data and the incidence of smoking. Body weights and body mass indexes were significantly higher among patients with sustained hypertension than among either normotensive or white-coat hypertensive patients. Intimal-medial thicknesses and carotid cross-sectional areas were similar in patients with white-coat and sustained hypertension and significantly higher than in normotensive subjects. Collectively, these findings suggest that white-coat hypertension contributed to the presence of carotid arteriosclerosis in our subjects in a manner similar to sustained hypertension. Thus, clinical evaluation of white-coat hypertension should be conducted with the potential for target organ damage in mind. (Hypertens Res 2004; 27: 739-745)

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© 2004 by the Japanese Society of Hypertension
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