Industrial Health
Online ISSN : 1880-8026
Print ISSN : 0019-8366
ISSN-L : 0019-8366
Original Articles
Working Hours, Coping Skills, and Psychological Health in Japanese Daytime Workers
Yasumasa OTSUKATakeshi SASAKIKenji IWASAKIIppei MORI
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JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

2009 Volume 47 Issue 1 Pages 22-32

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Abstract

This study examined the relationship between coping skills, working hours, and psychological health among Japanese daytime workers. Self-administered questionnaires were mailed to a randomly selected sample of 2,000 workers who were members of a pre-recruited market research panel. A total of 1,821 participants responded (response rate=91.1%). Participants completed a questionnaire regarding working hours, coping skills, and psychological health (negative emotions, fatigue, and concentration/activity levels). Analyses of covariance were conducted to determine the relations of number of working hours, coping skills, and their interactions to psychological health with control for sex, age, drinking, job type, and employment type. Results revealed that working hours were significantly associated with fatigue and concentration/activity levels. High levels of instrumental support and positive reframing were significantly associated with low levels of negative emotions, fatigue, and concentration/activity levels. High levels of self-blame, denial, substance use, venting, self-distraction, religion, and behavioral disengagement were significantly associated with high levels of negative emotions, fatigue, and concentration/activity levels. This study suggests that improving coping skills such as using instrumental support or positive reframing may reduce the adverse health effects of long working hours.

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© 2009 by National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health
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