Industrial Health
Online ISSN : 1880-8026
Print ISSN : 0019-8366
Original Articles
Moderating effects of salivary testosterone levels on associations between job demand and psychological stress response in Japanese medical workers
Kumi HIROKAWAMachiko MIWAToshiyo TANIGUCHIMasao TSUCHIYANorito KAWAKAMI
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2016 Volume 54 Issue 3 Pages 194-203

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Abstract

Levels of job stress have been shown to be inversely associated with testosterone levels, but some inconsistent results have been documented. We investigated the moderating effects of testosterone levels on associations between job stress-factors and psychological stress responses in Japanese medical workers. The participants were 63 medical staff (20 males and 43 women; mean age: 30.6 years; SD=7.3) in Okayama, Japan. Their job-stress levels and psychological stress responses were evaluated using self-administered questionnaires, and their salivary testosterone collected. Multiple regression analyses showed that job demand was positively associated with stress responses in men and women. An interaction between testosterone and support from colleagues had a significant effect on depression and anxiety for women. In women with lower testosterone levels, a reducing effect of support from colleagues on depression and anxiety was intensified. In women with higher testosterone levels, depression and anxiety levels were identical regardless of support from colleagues. Testosterone may function as a moderator between perceived work environment and psychological stress responses for female medical workers.

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© 2016 by National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health
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