Industrial Health
Online ISSN : 1880-8026
Print ISSN : 0019-8366
ISSN-L : 0019-8366
Self-Reported Sleep Quality, Job Stress, and Daytime Autonomic Activities Assessed in Terms of Short-Term Heart Rate Variability among Male White-Collar Workers
Takayuki KAGEYAMANoriko NISHIKIDOToshio KOBAYASHIYoshika KUROKAWATetsuya KANEKOMichinori KABUTO
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1998 Volume 36 Issue 3 Pages 263-272

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Abstract

To investigate the relationships among the amount of job stressors, self-reported sleep quality, and daytime autonomic activities, a questionnaire survey was conducted for 223 healthy male white-collar workers, and their short-term heart rate variability (HRV) was also examined. Half of the subjects complained of nightly poor sleep quality. Self-reported poor sleep quality was associated with a qualitative aspect of job stressors characterized by high amounts of “job difficulty”, less amounts of “achievement in job”, and less amounts of “support by colleagues”, and also with high amounts of personal distress and difficulty in changing their mood. Those who complained of poor sleep quality exhibited sympathetic predominance and reduced heartbeat intervals at standing rest, although job stressors was not correlated to HRV. These results suggest that their job stress disrupts nightly sleep, and also that their insufficient sleep at night causes daytime sympathetic predominance. However, the amount of job stressors was not directly associated with HRV. Further studies should focus on the relationships among chronic job stress, the satisfaction of sleep demands, and the daily and long-term variation in cardiac autonomic activities.

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© National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health
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