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Internal Medicine
Vol. 47 (2008) No. 18 P 1561-1565

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http://doi.org/10.2169/internalmedicine.47.0710

ORIGINAL ARTICLES

Objective We investigated the factors contributing to whether or not hypertensive patients brought their home blood pressure records to the outpatient clinic.
Method We studied 325 hypertensive patients [169 men (66.3±11.4 years old) and 156 women (68.1±11.2 years old)] who had received medical treatment for hypertension in our outpatient clinic from June to August 2006.
Results Of the 325 patients studied, 206 (63.4%, 101 men, 105 women) brought their home blood pressure records to our outpatient clinic. Logistic analysis showed age [odds ratio (OR) =0.95; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.93-0.98; p=0.0002], systolic blood pressure in outpatient clinic (OR=1.02; 95% CI: 1.00-1.04; p=0.0488) and the number of medicines prescribed (OR=1.94; 95% CI: 1.37-2.75; p=0.0002) were independent factors contributing to whether or not hypertensive patients bring along their home blood pressure records to the outpatient clinic.
Conclusion The contributing factors determining whether the patients bring their home blood pressure records to the outpatient clinic were: younger age, higher systolic blood pressure in the outpatient clinic, and a higher number of antihypertensive drugs. In conclusion, our results suggest that physicians should further motivate older patients, with well-controlled blood pressure in the outpatient clinic, to bring their home blood pressure records to the outpatient clinic.

Copyright © 2008 by The Japanese Society of Internal Medicine

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