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Internal Medicine
Vol. 50 (2011) No. 21 P 2499-2502

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http://doi.org/10.2169/internalmedicine.50.5844

ORIGINAL ARTICLES

Objective Sleep is one of the major means to maintain health. The association of short sleep duration with obesity, diabetes, fatty liver and behavioral factors requires further exploration.
Methods A total of 8157 Japanese men who underwent health evaluations were divided into 3 groups by sleep duration <5 hours, 5~<7 hours and ≥7 hours. Poor sleep was self-reported, being defined as difficulty of getting to sleep or awakening easily. The age-adjusted and age and poor sleep-adjusted odds ratios of the 3 groups for obesity, diabetes, fatty liver, mental stress, poor sleep, regular exercise and late dinner time were investigated.
Results Compared to the sleep duration 5~<7 hours group, the age-adjusted odds ratios of the <5 hours group were significantly higher for obesity (1.42), diabetes (1.63), mental stress (1.75), poor sleep (1.85), late dinner time (1.47), and significantly lower for regular exercise (0.61); while those of the ≥7 hours group were significantly lower for obesity (0.73), fatty liver (0.82), mental stress (0.73), poor sleep (0.69), late dinner time (0.45), and significantly higher for regular exercise (1.27). Above significances still existed after adjustment for age and poor sleep.
Conclusion Short sleep duration is associated with obesity, diabetes, fatty liver and multiple behavioral factors. The optimal sleep duration for health promotion and effective actions for obtaining optimal sleep, including modifications of behavioral and environmental factors, should be one of the major concerns of public health.

Copyright © 2011 by The Japanese Society of Internal Medicine

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