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Journal of Epidemiology
Vol. 22 (2012) No. 5 P 425-432

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http://doi.org/10.2188/jea.JE20110132

Original Article

Background: We investigated socioeconomic inequalities in hypertension prevalence, treatment, and control among middle-aged Koreans.
Methods: We analyzed data from 4275 adults aged between 40 and 64 years who participated in the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2007 and 2008. Education, income, and occupational level were evaluated to assess the relationship of socioeconomic status with hypertension prevalence, treatment, and control.
Results: There were significant differences in socioeconomic status among individuals with no hypertension, controlled hypertension, and uncontrolled hypertension in both sexes. In multiple logistic regression models, as compared with men who had more than 12 years of education, those with 7 to 12 years and less than 7 years of education had odds ratios (ORs) for untreated hypertension of 2.14 (95% CI: 1.18 to 3.90) and 2.98 (95% CI: 1.42 to 6.28), respectively (P for trend <0.05). As compared with women who had more than 12 years of education, those with 7 to 12 years and less than 7 years of education had ORs for hypertension prevalence of 1.75 (95% CI: 1.10 to 2.78) and 1.88 (95% CI: 1.12 to 3.16), respectively (P for trend <0.05). Women who worked as manual labors had an OR for uncontrolled hypertension of 1.50 (95% CI: 1.02 to 2.22) as compared with women in other jobs. There was no statistically significant association between income level and hypertension control.
Conclusions: Socioeconomic status was independently associated with hypertension prevalence and care, which suggests a need for health policy efforts to reduce the socioeconomic disparity in hypertension management.

Copyright © 2012 by the Japan Epidemiological Association

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