THE JAPANESE JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY
Online ISSN : 1348-6276
Print ISSN : 0387-7973
THE EFFECT OF EMPATHIC CONTACT IN EMOTIONAL ROLE-PLAYING IN CHANGING AND MAINTAINING OF ATTITUDE-BEHAVIOR
TETSURO TAKAHASI
Author information
JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

1977 Volume 16 Issue 2 Pages 99-109

Details
Abstract

The purpose of the present study is to clarify the effect of empathic contact in emotional roleplaying in changing and maintaining of attitudebehavior toward cigarette smoking in the framework of educational laboratory training. This technique is based on the conflict theory approach to attitude change and decision making (Janis & Mann, 1968).
The unique features of this emotional roleplaying consists of a standardized psychodramatic procedure in which the E induces the Ss to give an improvised emotional performance by asking him to act out a fiction calamity, as though it were really happening, using props or other staging. The E enters directly into dramatic dialogues with the Ss, following a standardized script and thus is able to focus the Ss attention. The material used is smoking behavior. The Ss were 30 women students from 3 different universities, 21-22 years of age, all of whom volunteered to participate in a research study. All of them were smokers. The main results were as follow;
(1). Emotional role-player (Ss asked for the role of patient) produced more changes and maintenances toward their attitude and behavior receiving empathically the threat and scientific information aroused by communicator (E asked for the role of the doctor).
(2). Control group (Video tape T. V. Observer) provided only information and produced little change, which was toward the negative direction after ten days in experiment.
(3). The mediate variables in changing of attitude and behavior weren't the fear levels, but the anxiety levels.
(4). He produced more effective changes in emotional role-playing with those who had shown a high discrepancy between the real-self and the ideal self in self concept.

Information related to the author
© The Japanese Group Dynamics Association
Previous article Next article
feedback
Top