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Journal of Occupational Health
Vol. 54 (2012) No. 1 P 1-8

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http://doi.org/10.1539/joh.11-0169-OA

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Objectives: Anxiety disorders are the most prevalent mental health problem. However, few studies are available pertaining to this problem among Chinese doctors, a special occupational population exposed to high stress, especially during the implementation of health system reform. The aim of this study was to assess anxiety disorder among Chinese doctors and clarify its risk factors. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in 7 teaching hospitals of China Medical University. Questionnaires pertaining to anxiety disorder indicated by the Zung Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS) and demographic characteristics, health status, lifestyle factors, work conditions and work-related psychological status were distributed to all registered doctors during April-June 2009. There were 1,134 effective respondents (effective response rate 71.2%), and these respondents became our subjects (539 male doctors and 595 female doctors). Results: The average standard scores of SAS for the male and female doctors were 46.8 and 46.7. General linear model analysis indicated that SAS was associated with, in standardized estimate (β) sequence, cynicism, emotional exhaustion, professional efficacy, sleeping problem, chronic diseases and physical exercise in men and with professional efficacy, emotional exhaustion, cynicism, sleeping problem, chronic diseases, job satisfaction, alcohol consumption and meals in women. Work-related psychological status contributed the most to the model R-square. Conclusion: Chinese doctors were at considerably high risk of anxiety disorder and job burnout and sleeping problem had prominent roles. Interventions such as preventing exhaustion at work and improving sleep quality should be given attention during health care system reform with the aim of lessening anxiety disorder in doctors in China.

Copyright © 2012 by the Japan Society for Occupational Health

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