Journal of Physical Therapy Science
Online ISSN : 2187-5626
Print ISSN : 0915-5287
ISSN-L : 0915-5287
Original Article
Different improvement trends in gait function and quadriceps strength early after total knee arthroplasty
Akira IwataYuki SanoHideyuki WanakaSaki YamamotoYuki YanoHiroshi Iwata
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2019 Volume 31 Issue 1 Pages 57-62

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Abstract

[Purpose] Improved quadriceps strength is a primary target of rehabilitation early after total knee arthroplasty. However, patients demonstrate varying improvement trends in gait function and quadriceps strength. This study evaluated the relationship between improvements in quadriceps strength and gait function. [Participants and Methods] The study included 49 patients who were scheduled to undergo unilateral total knee arthroplasty. Gait function, bilateral quadriceps strength, and pain were assessed in all patients. All assessments were performed preoperatively and at 2 and 3 weeks postoperatively. [Results] A significant correlation between gait function and the quadriceps strength on the operated side was observed preoperatively and 3 weeks postoperatively. The quadriceps strength on the non-operated side was significantly correlated with gait function at all time points. Multiple regression analysis showed that the quadriceps strength on the non-operated side was significantly associated with gait function, except the gait speed at 2 weeks. However, the quadriceps strength on the operated side was not observed to be an independent variable at all time points. [Conclusion] The quadriceps strength on the operated side is not an important determinant of gait function. It may be necessary to reconsider typical rehabilitation programs by focusing on the quadriceps strength on the operated side in patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty.

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© 2019 by the Society of Physical Therapy Science. Published by IPEC Inc.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives (by-nc-nd) License.
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
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