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Palliative Care Research
Vol. 11 (2016) No. 4 p. 274-281

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http://doi.org/10.2512/jspm.11.274

Original Research

Objective: This study aimed to (1) understanding the activities, job satisfaction, and burn out of certified nurses in palliative care, and (2) develop suggestions for increasing job satisfaction and preventing burnout among these nurses. Methods: Questionnaires were sent to 362 certified nurses in palliative care in 2008 with a series of questions on their background, activities, job satisfaction, and burnout according to the burnout scale. Results: Logistic regression analysis was performed on 226 completed and returned. Powered by Editorial Manager® and ProduXion Manager® from Aries Systems Corporation questionnaires. Attributes associated with the group of respondents who reported higher job satisfaction included “higher age,” “long tenure in the job category,” and “having well-defined objectives.” The burnout group, which accounted for 44% of the respondents, was associated with the factors of “lower job satisfaction score,” “unsatisfactory working location and/or conditions,” “lower satisfaction about social recognition of their profession,” and “being unmarried.” Conclusion: Higher job satisfaction and prevention of burnout among the respondents were associated with higher age and good communication within the organizations. The findings suggest that interventions are required to support nurses who are younger and face difficulties in communication within the organizations.

Copyright © 2016 by Japanese Society for Palliative Medicine

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