Journal of the Japan Veterinary Medical Association
Online ISSN : 2186-0211
Print ISSN : 0446-6454
ISSN-L : 0446-6454
An Outbreak of Food Poisoning Possibly Attributed to Whale-Meat Bacon
A. ATAMIK. AOYAGIS. ONOT. SUZUKIH. SUZUKIK. KURIHARAH. NISHIZUKAH. OKAG. NINOHEC. UMEZAWAH. KIMURAJ. ABIKOK. TAKANASHIT. YAMAGUCHIT. NIWAH. NAKAMURAK. TAKATSUKII. ENDOS. OKADAY. SATOK. SHOJIH. SHIBAS. OKUYAMAS. IGARASHIY. SaitoM. KikuchiC. Maki
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1964 Volume 17 Issue 10 Pages 521-526,539

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Abstract

A total of 244 persons were reported officially to be involved in an outbreak of food poisoning possibly attributed to whale-meat bacon in Yamagata and its neighboring areas in Yamagata Prefecture at the end of August. One fatal case occurred in the city of Yamagata.
The period of incubation was 12 to 21 hours in most cases. The main symptoms consisted of fever, stomachache, vomiting, and diarrhea and were almost identical with those of food poisoning known to be caused by enteritis vibriones.
The incriminated food was whale-meat bacon, which had been eaten without being cooked. The same food as this, in raw state, was given per os to mice and cats without any ill effect. Bacteriological examination failed to detect any known pathogenic organisms, except staphylococci, or such enteritis vibriones as identical with those of the known serotype.
Enteritis vibrio O-2 (“E” by Agatsuma's classification) was detected from 19 (76%) of 25 fecal specimens collected from the patients involved. Staphylococcus and Proteus were also detected from these specimens. Most of the staphylococci isolated from the whale-meat bacon, and the fecal specimens were coagulase-positive.
All the strains of enteritis vibriones isolated from the fecal specimens were pathogenic for mice. So were three strains of these organisms isolated from the whale-meat bacon.

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