The Bulletin of Tokyo Dental College
Original Article
ORAL HABITS OF TEMPOROMANDIBULAR DISORDER PATIENTS WITH MALOCCLUSION
YUKIE FUJITAETSUKO MOTEGIMAYUMI NOMURASAKURA KAWAMURADAISUKE YAMAGUCHIHIDEHARU YAMAGUCHI
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Volume 44 (2003) Issue 4 Pages 201-207

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Abstract

The purpose of this study was to clarify the relationship between oral habits and symptoms of temporomandibular joint disorder in patients who had sought orthodontic treatment by analyzing their present and past history. The subjects were 57 female patients (average age: 23 years and 6 months old) who had visited the “Temporomandibular Disorder Section” in our orthodontic department. Their chief complaints were the symptom of TMJ and the abnormalities of occlusion such as maxillary protrusion, open bite, crowding, mandibular protrusion, cross bite, deep bite, edge-to-edge bite, and spacing. Their present conditions and past histories were examined and evaluated. The most typical primary symptom was joint sound (23 patients, 40.0%). The second was joint sound and pain (15 patients, 26.3%). Of the symptoms present at the time of examination, the most prevalent were joint sound and pain (20 patients, 35.1%). The 48 patients (82.8%) had significant oral habits. Unilateral chewing was seen in 35 patients (72.9%), bruxism in 27 (56.3%), abnormality of posture in 14 (29.2%), habitual crunching in 10 (20.8%) and resting the cheek on the hand in 4 (8.3%), respectively. When comparing the primary symptoms to those at the time of examination, the patients with unilateral chewing and bruxism tended to have more complicated symptoms. In conclusion, the TMD symptoms of the patients with notable oral habits did not change or become worse during a period of about 5 years.

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© 2003 by Tokyo Dental College, Japan
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