ACTA HISTOCHEMICA ET CYTOCHEMICA
Online ISSN : 1347-5800
Print ISSN : 0044-5991
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Volume 46 , Issue 2
Showing 1-6 articles out of 6 articles from the selected issue
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REGULAR ARTICLE
  • Tomoyuki Suzuki, Ping Dai, Tomoya Hatakeyama, Yoshinori Harada, Hideo ...
    Type: Regular Article
    Volume 46 (2013) Issue 2 Pages 51-58
    Released: April 30, 2013
    [Advance publication] Released: March 05, 2013
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS FULL-TEXT HTML
    Proliferation of pancreatic β-cells is an important mechanism underlying β-cell mass adaptation to metabolic demands. Increasing β-cell mass by regeneration may ameliorate or correct both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, which both result from inadequate production of insulin by β-cells of the pancreatic islet. Transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) signaling is essential for fetal development and growth of pancreatic islets. In this study, we exposed HIT-T15, a clonal pancreatic β-cell line, to TGF-β signaling. We found that inhibition of TGF-β signaling promotes proliferation of the cells significantly, while TGF-β signaling stimulation inhibits proliferation of the cells remarkably. We confirmed that this proliferative regulation by TGF-β signaling is due to the changed expression of the cell cycle regulator p27. Furthermore, we demonstrated that there is no observed effect on transcriptional activity of p27 by TGF-β signaling. Our data show that TGF-β signaling mediates the cell-cycle progression of pancreatic β-cells by regulating the nuclear localization of CDK inhibitor, p27. Inhibition of TGF-β signaling reduces the nuclear accumulation of p27, and as a result this inhibition promotes proliferation of β-cells.
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  • Tsuneyuki Koga, Jean-Pierre Bellier, Hiroshi Kimura, Ikuo Tooyama
    Type: Regular Article
    Volume 46 (2013) Issue 2 Pages 59-64
    Released: April 30, 2013
    [Advance publication] Released: March 23, 2013
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    Transcripts of the choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) gene reveal a number of different splice variants including ChAT of a peripheral type (pChAT). Immunohistochemical staining of the brain using an antibody against pChAT clearly revealed peripheral cholinergic neurons, but failed to detect cholinergic neurons in the central nervous system. In rodents, pChAT-immunoreactivity has been detected in cholinergic parasympathetic postganglionic and enteric ganglion neurons. In addition, pChAT has been observed in non-cholinergic neurons such as peripheral sensory neurons in the trigeminal and dorsal root ganglia. The common type of ChAT (cChAT) has been investigated in many parts of the brain and the spinal cord of non-human primates, but little information is available about the localization of pChAT in primate species. Here, we report the detection of pChAT immunoreactivity in trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons and its co-localization with Substance P (SP) and/or calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in the cynomolgus monkey, Macaca fascicularis. Neurons positive for pChAT were observed in a rather uniform pattern in approximately half of the trigeminal neurons throughout the TG. Most pChAT-positive neurons had small or medium-sized cell bodies. Double-immunofluorescence staining showed that 85.1% of SP-positive cells and 74.0% of CGRP-positive cells exhibited pChAT immunoreactivity. Most pChAT-positive cells were part of a larger population of neurons that co-expressed SP and/or CGRP.
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  • Sayaka Kurata, Tetsuya Goto, Kaori K. Gunjigake, Shinji Kataoka, Kayok ...
    Type: Regular Article
    Volume 46 (2013) Issue 2 Pages 65-73
    Released: April 30, 2013
    [Advance publication] Released: April 12, 2013
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    Nerve growth factor (NGF) plays a critical role in the trigeminal ganglion (TG) following peripheral nerve damage in the oral region. Although neurons in the TG are surrounded by satellite glial cells (SGCs) that passively support neural function, little is known regarding NGF expression and its interactions with TG neurons and SGCs. This study was performed to examine the expression of NGF in TG neurons and SGCs with nerve damage by experimental tooth movement. An elastic band was inserted between the first and second upper molars of rats. The TG was removed at 0–7 days after tooth movement. Using in situ hybridization, NGF mRNA was expressed in both neurons and SGCs. Immunostaining for NGF demonstrated that during tooth movement the number of NGF-immunoreactive SGCs increased significantly as compared with baseline and reached maximum levels at day 3. Furthermore, the administration of the gap junction inhibitor carbenoxolone at the TG during tooth movement significantly decreased the number of NGF-immunoreactive SGCs. These results suggested that peripheral nerve damage may induce signal transduction from neurons to SGCs via gap junctions, inducing NGF expression in SGCs around neurons, and released NGF may be involved in the restoration of damaged neurons.
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  • Masayuki Nakazawa, Yoko Obata, Tomoya Nishino, Shinichi Abe, Yuka Naka ...
    Type: Regular Article
    Volume 46 (2013) Issue 2 Pages 75-84
    Released: April 30, 2013
    [Advance publication] Released: April 12, 2013
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    Leptin is a hormone mainly produced by white adipose cells, and regulates body fat and food intake by acting on hypothalamus. Leptin receptor is expressed not only in the hypothalamus but in a variety of peripheral tissues, suggesting that leptin has pleiotropic functions. In this study, we investigated the effect of leptin on the progression of peritoneal fibrosis induced by intraperitoneal injection of chlorhexidine gluconate (CG) every other day for 2 or 3 weeks in mice. This study was conducted in male C57BL/6 mice and leptin-deficient ob/ob mice. Peritoneal fluid, blood, and peritoneal tissues were collected 15 or 22 days after CG injection. CG injection increased the level of leptin in serum and peritoneal fluid with thickening of submesothelial compact zone in wild type mice, but CG-injected ob/ob mice attenuate peritoneal fibrosis, and markedly reduced the number of myofibroblasts, infiltrating macrophages, and blood vessels in the thickened submesothelial area. The 2-week leptin administration induced a more thickened peritoneum in the CG-injected C57BL/6 mice than in the PBS group. Our results indicate that an upregulation of leptin appears to play a role in fibrosis and inflammation during peritoneal injury, and reducing leptin may be a therapeutically potential for peritoneal fibrosis.
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  • Yoko Nakanishi, Tetsuo Shimizu, Ichiro Tsujino, Yukari Obana, Toshimi ...
    Type: Regular Article
    Volume 46 (2013) Issue 2 Pages 85-96
    Released: April 30, 2013
    [Advance publication] Released: April 12, 2013
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    In patients with inoperable advanced non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLCs), histological subtyping using small-mount biopsy specimens was often required to decide the indications for drug treatment. The aim of this study was to assess the utility of highly sensitive mRNA quantitation for the subtyping of advanced NSCLC using small formalin fixing and paraffin embedding (FFPE) biopsy samples. Cytokeratin (CK) 6, CK7, CK14, CK18, and thyroid transcription factor (TTF)-1 mRNA expression levels were measured using semi-nested real-time quantitative (snq) reverse-transcribed polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in microdissected tumor cells collected from 52 lung biopsies. Our results using the present snqRT-PCR method showed an improvement in mRNA quantitation from small FFPE samples, and the mRNA expression level using snqRT-PCR was correlated with the immunohistochemical protein expression level. CK7, CK18, and TTF-1 mRNA were expressed at significantly higher levels (P<0.05) in adenocarcinoma (AD) than in squamous cell carcinoma (SQ), while CK6 and CK14 mRNA expression was significantly higher (P<0.05) in SQ than in AD. Each histology-specific CK, particularly CK18 in AD and CK6 in SQ, were shown to be correlated with a poor prognosis (P=0.02, 0.02, respectively). Our results demonstrated that a quantitative CK subtype mRNA analysis from lung biopsy samples can be useful for predicting the histology subtype and prognosis of advanced NSCLC.
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  • Takanobu Uchiyama, Shunsuke Takata, Hiroyuki Ishikawa, Yoshihiko Sawa
    Type: Regular Article
    Volume 46 (2013) Issue 2 Pages 97-104
    Released: April 30, 2013
    [Advance publication] Released: April 12, 2013
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS FULL-TEXT HTML
    The dynamics of the renal lymphatic circulation in diabetic nephropathy is not fully elucidated. The present study evaluated the effect of diabetic nephropathy on the renal lymphatic circulation in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced type 1 diabetic mice (ICR-STZ) and in type 2 diabetic KK/Ta mice which were fed a high fat diet (KK/Ta-HF). The diabetic mouse kidneys developed edema because of the nephropathy. In control mice renal lymphatic vessels distributed in the cortex but rarely in the medulla while in ICR-STZ and KK/Ta-HF mice, there were many lymphatic vessels with small lumen in both cortex and medulla. Total numbers and areas of renal blood vessels in the diabetic mice were similar to those in the controls while the total numbers and areas of renal lymphatic vessels were larger in diabetic mice than in the controls. There were statistically significant differences in the numbers of lymphatic vessels with diameters of 50–100 µm between the ICR-STZ and the control ICR mice, and in the numbers of lymphatic capillaries with diameters smaller than 50 µm between the KK/Ta-HF and the control KK/Ta mice. The diabetic nephropathy may induce the lymphangiogenesis or result in at least the renal lymphatic vessel expansion.
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