ACTA HISTOCHEMICA ET CYTOCHEMICA
Online ISSN : 1347-5800
Print ISSN : 0044-5991
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Volume 46 , Issue 6
Showing 1-4 articles out of 4 articles from the selected issue
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REGULAR ARTICLE
  • Takaomi Adachi, Noriyuki Sugiyama, Tatsuro Gondai, Hideo Yagita, Takah ...
    Type: Regular Article
    Volume 46 (2013) Issue 6 Pages 161-170
    Released: December 28, 2013
    [Advance publication] Released: November 22, 2013
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS FULL-TEXT HTML
    Renal ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) is a leading cause of acute kidney injury (AKI). Many investigators have reported that cell death via apoptosis significantly contributed to the pathophysiology of renal IRI. Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor superfamily, and induces apoptosis and inflammation. However, the role of TRAIL in renal IRI is unclear. Here, we investigated whether TRAIL contributes to renal IRI and whether TRAIL blockade could attenuate renal IRI. AKI was induced by unilateral clamping of the renal pedicle for 60 min in male FVB/N mice. We found that the expression of TRAIL and its receptors were highly upregulated in renal tubular cells in renal IRI. Neutralizing anti-TRAIL antibody or its control IgG was given 24 hr before ischemia and a half-dose booster injection was administered into the peritoneal cavity immediately after reperfusion. We found that TRAIL blockade inhibited tubular apoptosis and reduced the accumulation of neutrophils and macrophages. Furthermore, TRAIL blockade attenuated renal fibrosis and atrophy after IRI. In conclusion, our study suggests that TRAIL is a critical pathogenic factor in renal IRI, and that TRAIL could be a new therapeutic target for the prevention of renal IRI.
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  • Miwa Tomooka, Chiaki Kaji, Hiroshi Kojima, Yoshihiko Sawa
    Type: Regular Article
    Volume 46 (2013) Issue 6 Pages 171-177
    Released: December 28, 2013
    [Advance publication] Released: December 25, 2013
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS FULL-TEXT HTML
    Podoplanin is a mucin-type glycoprotein which was first identified in podocytes. Recently, podoplanin has been successively reported as a marker for brain and peripheral nerve tumors, however, the distribution of podoplanin-expressing cells in normal nerves has not been fully investigated. This study aims to examine the podoplanin-expressing cell distribution in the mouse head and nervous systems. An immunohistochemical study showed that the podoplanin-positive areas in the mouse peripheral nerve and spinal cord are perineurial fibroblasts, satellite cells in the dorsal root ganglion, glia cells in the ventral and dorsal horns, and schwann cells in the ventral and dorsal roots; in the cranial meninges the dura mater, arachnoid, and pia mater; in the eye the optic nerve, retinal pigment epithelium, chorioidea, sclera, iris, lens epithelium, corneal epithelium, and conjunctival epithelium. In the mouse brain choroid plexus and ependyma were podoplanin-positive, and there were podoplanin-expressing brain parenchymal cells in the nuclei and cortex. The podoplanin-expressing cells were astrocyte marker GFAP-positive and there were no differences in the double positive cell distribution of several portions in the brain parenchyma except for the fornix. The results suggest that podoplanin may play a common role in nervous system support cells and eye constituents.
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  • Katsuro Furukawa, Keitaro Matsumoto, Takeshi Nagayasu, Tomomi Yamamoto ...
    Type: Regular Article
    Volume 46 (2013) Issue 6 Pages 179-185
    Released: December 28, 2013
    [Advance publication] Released: December 25, 2013
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS FULL-TEXT HTML
    Keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) is considered to be one of the most important mitogens for lung epithelial cells. The objectives of this study were to confirm the effectiveness of intratracheal injection of recombinant human KGF (rhKGF) during compensatory lung growth and to optimize the instillation protocol. Here, trilobectomy in adult rat was performed, followed by intratracheal rhKGF instillation with low (0.4 mg/kg) and high (4 mg/kg) doses at various time-points. The proliferation of alveolar cells was assessed by the immunostaining for proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in the residual lung. We also investigated other immunohistochemical parameters such as KGF, KGF receptor and surfactant protein A as well as terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling. Consequently, intratracheal single injection of rhKGF in high dose group significantly increased PCNA labeling index (LI) of alveolar cells in the remaining lung. Surprisingly, there was no difference in PCNA LI between low and high doses of rhKGF with daily injection, and PCNA LI reached a plateau level with 2 days-consecutive administration (about 60%). Our results indicate that even at low dose, daily intratracheal injection is effective to maintain high proliferative states during the early phase of compensatory lung growth.
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  • Taketo Susa, Nobuhiko Sawai, Takeo Aoki, Akiko Iizuka-Kogo, Hiroshi Ko ...
    Type: Regular Article
    Volume 46 (2013) Issue 6 Pages 187-197
    Released: December 28, 2013
    [Advance publication] Released: December 25, 2013
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS FULL-TEXT HTML
    Aquaporins are water channel proteins which enable rapid water movement across the plasma membrane. Aquaporin-5 (AQP5) is the major aquaporin and is expressed on the apical membrane of salivary gland acinar cells. We examined the effects of repeated administration of pilocarpine, a clinically useful stimulant for salivary fluid secretion, and isoproterenol (IPR), a stimulant for salivary protein secretion, on the abundance of AQP5 protein in rat salivary glands by immunofluorescence microscopy and semi-quantitative immunoblotting. Unexpectedly AQP5 was decreased in pilocarpine-administered salivary glands, in which fluid secretion must be highly stimulated, implying that AQP5 might not be required for fluid secretion at least in pilocarpine-administered state. The abundance of AQP5, on the other hand, was found to be significantly increased in IPR-administered submandibular and parotid glands. To address the possible mechanism of the elevation of AQP5 abundance in IPR-administered animals, changes of AQP5 level in fasting animals, in which the exocytotic events are reduced, were examined. AQP5 was found to be decreased in fasting animals as expected. These results suggested that the elevation of cAMP and/or frequent exocytotic events could increase AQP5 protein. AQP5 expression seems to be easily changed by salivary stimulants, although these changes do not always reflect the ability in salivary fluid secretion.
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