ACTA HISTOCHEMICA ET CYTOCHEMICA
Online ISSN : 1347-5800
Print ISSN : 0044-5991
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Volume 47 , Issue 3
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REGULAR ARTICLE
  • Hirofumi Matsumoto, Tomoshi Tsuchiya, Koh-ichiro Yoshiura, Tomayoshi H ...
    Type: Regular Article
    Volume 47 (2014) Issue 3 Pages 85-94
    Released: June 28, 2014
    [Advance publication] Released: June 18, 2014
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS FULL-TEXT HTML
    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are involved in chemotherapy resistance. Multidrug-resistance protein 8 (ABCC11/MRP8) is also involved in 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) metabolism. 5-FU and its derivatives are widely used in the treatment of gastrointestinal tract cancers, but little is known about the contribution of ABCC11/MRP8 to gastrointestinal tract and related cancers. Here, we report our investigation of ABCC11/MRP8 expression in normal and cancerous gastrointestinal tract tissues and reveal its novel role in the gastric mucosa. In tissue microarray and surgically resected cancer specimens, immunohistochemical (IHC) staining revealed significantly reduced expression of ABCC11/MRP8 in gastrointestinal tract cancers compared with other cancers. In contrast, strong ABCC11/MRP8 expression was observed in normal gastric mucosa. Additional immuno­fluorescence assays revealed co-localization of ABCC11/MRP8 and pepsinogen I in normal gastric chief cells. Quantitative PCR and Western blot analysis also revealed significant expression of ABCC11/MRP8 in fundic mucosa where the chief cells are mainly located. Furthermore, the ABCC11 mRNA-suppressed NCI-N87 gastric cancer cell line failed to secret pepsinogen I extracellularly. Thus, low expression of ABCC11/MRP8 is consistent with chemotherapeutic regimens using 5-FU and its derivatives in gastrointestinal tract cancers. Our results indicated a novel function of ABCC11/MRP8 in the regulation of pepsinogen I secretion in the normal gastric chief cells.
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  • Ryoko Yamagishi, Tomohiko Wakayama, Hiroki Nakata, Kannika Adthapanyaw ...
    Type: Regular Article
    Volume 47 (2014) Issue 3 Pages 95-102
    Released: June 28, 2014
    [Advance publication] Released: June 14, 2014
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS FULL-TEXT HTML
    In the major salivary glands of mice, acinar cells in the parotid gland (PG) are known to be the main site for the production of the digestive enzyme α-amylase, whereas α-amylase production in the submandibular gland (SMG) and sublingual gland (SLG), as well as the cell types responsible for α-amylase production, has been less firmly established. To clarify this issue, we examined the expression and localization of both the mRNA and protein of α-amylase in the major salivary glands of male and female mice by quantitative and histochemical methods. α-amylase mRNA levels were higher in the order of PG, SMG, and SLG. No sexual difference was observed in α-amylase mRNA levels in the PG and SLG, whereas α-amylase mRNA levels in the female SMG were approximately 30% those in the male SMG. Using in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry, signals for α-amylase mRNA and protein were found to be strongly positive in acinar cells of the PG, serous demilune cells of the SLG, and granular convoluted tubule (GCT) cells of the male SMG, weakly positive in seromucous acinar cells of the male and female SMG, and negative in mucous acinar cells of the SLG. These results clarified that α-amylase is produced mainly by GCT cells and partly by acinar cells in the SMG, whereas it is produced exclusively by serous demilune cells in the SLG of mice.
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  • Ryohei Kono, Sachiko Nomura, Yoshiharu Okuno, Misa Nakamura, Akihiro M ...
    Type: Regular Article
    Volume 47 (2014) Issue 3 Pages 103-112
    Released: June 28, 2014
    [Advance publication] Released: June 14, 2014
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS FULL-TEXT HTML
    Granulosa cells form ovarian follicles and play important roles in the growth and maturation of oocytes. The protection of granulosa cells from cellular injury caused by oxidative stress is an effective therapy for female infertility. We here investigated an effective bioactive compound derived from Prunus mume seed extract that protects granulosa cells from hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced apoptosis. We detected the bioactive compound, 3,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde (3,4-DHBA), via bioactivity-guided isolation and found that it inhibited the H2O2-induced apoptosis of granulosa cells. We also showed that 3,4-DHBA promoted estradiol secretion in granulosa cells and enhanced the mRNA expression levels of steroidogenic factor 1, a promoter of key steroidogenic enzymes. These results suggest that P. mume seed extract may have clinical potential for the prevention and treatment of female infertility.
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  • Se-Jin Jeong, Hyun-Ho Kim, Won-Sig Lee, Chang-Jin Jeon
    Type: Regular Article
    Volume 47 (2014) Issue 3 Pages 113-123
    Released: June 28, 2014
    [Advance publication] Released: June 26, 2014
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS FULL-TEXT HTML
    The purpose of this study was to investigate the localization of cells containing the calcium-binding proteins (CBPs) calbindin D28K (CB), calretinin (CR), and parvalbumin (PV) in the superior colliculus (SC) of the bat using immunocytochemistry. CB-immunoreactive (IR) cells formed a laminar tier within the upper superficial gray layer (SGL), while CR-IR cells were widely distributed within the optic layer (OL). Scattered CR-IR cells were also found within the intermediate gray, white, and deep gray layers. By contrast, PV-IR cells formed a laminar tier within the lower SGL and upper OL. Scattered PV-IR cells were also found throughout the intermediate layers, but without a specific laminar pattern. The CBP-IR cells varied in size and morphology: While most of the CB-IR cells in the superficial layers were small round or oval cells, most CR-IR cells in the intermediate and deep layers were large stellate cells. By contrast, PV-IR cells were small to large in size and included round or oval, stellate, vertical fusiform, and horizontal cells. The average diameters of the CB-, CR-, and PV-IR cells were 11.59, 17.17, and 12.60 μm, respectively. Double-immunofluorescence revealed that the percentage of co-localization with GABA-IR cells was 0.0, 0.0, and 10.27% of CB-, CR-, and PV-IR cells, respectively. These results indicate that CBP distribution patterns in the bat SC are unique compared with other mammalian SCs, which suggest functional diversity of these proteins in visually guided behaviors.
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  • Takafumi Watanabe, Riko Kitazawa, Yosuke Mizuno, Natsumi Kuwahara, Chi ...
    Type: Regular Article
    Volume 47 (2014) Issue 3 Pages 125-131
    Released: June 28, 2014
    [Advance publication] Released: June 26, 2014
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS FULL-TEXT HTML
    Analysis of archival formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) pathological specimens of three case of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and three cases of classical Hodgkin lymphoma (CHL) revealed that hypermethylation of the BOB.1 gene promoter was exclusively observed in CHL. A discrepancy was observed, however, between the methylation status of the BOB.1 gene promoter and its expression in the EBV-positive mixed cellular CHL (MCCHL). Since MCCHL lacks the typical B-cell phenotype even in the presence of abundant BOB.1 transcription factors, functional activity of BOB.1 may be lost or reduced by a mechanism other than epigenetic gene silencing. When some tumor-suppressor gene products have lost their biological function, impact or significance of derepression of such genes may be little. Therefore, when interpreting immunohistochemical results for diagnostic or research purposes, it must be borne in mind that apparent positive immunostaining can merely be the result of chromatin remodeling and that such transient expression often has little functional significance. Any apparent positive immunohistochemical result needs to be interpreted carefully with the help of the hypermethylation status as a molecular marker of gene silencing memory.
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