Journal of Rural Problems
Online ISSN : 2185-9973
Print ISSN : 0388-8525
ISSN-L : 0388-8525
Current issue
Displaying 1-8 of 8 articles from this issue
Short Paper
  • Kohei Ueda, Shinji Takada
    Article type: Short Paper
    2022 Volume 58 Issue 2 Pages 59-66
    Published: June 25, 2022
    Released on J-STAGE: July 01, 2022
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS FULL-TEXT HTML

    This study aims to clarify the kind of environment necessary for migrants who have migrated for negative reasons to develop proactive activities in the community. GTA analysis was conducted on data obtained from an interview-based survey of five young U-turn migrants in Unnan city, Shimane Prefecture. The subjects had fallen into an unstable mental state due to the failure of job hunting and the perception of parental burden and had decided to make a U-turn. After moving to Japan, one subject overcame her negative mental state by participating in community activities, and we confirmed that her feelings toward community activities became more positive. The migrants need to have an existence that invites them to participate in community activities and be given a role in the activities and be recognized by others.

  • Yukiho Kobayashi, Masaya Nakatsuka
    Article type: Short Paper
    2022 Volume 58 Issue 2 Pages 67-74
    Published: June 25, 2022
    Released on J-STAGE: July 01, 2022
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    This study aims to reveal elements that encourage non-residents, who are not residents’ family members, to maintain collaboration with residents in rural communities, by focusing on the case of Kumadani, Echizen Town, Fukui Prefecture. Three non-residents were interviewed. Our research revealed that the following elements generate positive emotions in non-residents: Residents or people involved in a community: 1) create an opportunity for non-residents to learn, 2) provide support to expand non-residents’ networks and develop relationships in a community, 3) recognize non-residents individually, 4) create an environment for non-residents to try and exercise their abilities, 5) develop non-residents’ sense of belonging to a community, 6) develop non-residents’ sense of gaining confidence or credibility, and 7) develop non-residents’ independence to be involved in a community. From these elements, 1), 3), 5), and 7) encourage non-residents to maintain collaboration.

  • Xiaoxi Gao, Nobuyoshi Yasunaga, Norikazu Inoue
    Article type: Short Paper
    2022 Volume 58 Issue 2 Pages 75-81
    Published: June 25, 2022
    Released on J-STAGE: July 01, 2022
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS FULL-TEXT HTML

    This study examines the qualitative characteristics of the substantial community-based master plan using a text-mining analysis based on free descriptions of master plans in the Sanin region of the Chugoku area in Japan. We obtained the following results: First, community activities play an essential role in formulating a community-based master plan. Second, the relevance of frequent words varies with the scale of farmland preservation in a district. In areas with unfavorable farming conditions, the measures differ in each district because of the different farmland conditions, farm types, and conditions for accepting new farmers. In addition, local resources, farmland liquidation, and agricultural infrastructure significantly influence paddy field agriculture in hilly and mountainous areas. Rural revitalization measures in each region should consider the characteristics of the region so that the implementation of policy responses is based on residents’ awareness.

  • Miwa Kana
    Article type: Short Paper
    2022 Volume 58 Issue 2 Pages 82-89
    Published: June 25, 2022
    Released on J-STAGE: July 01, 2022
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS FULL-TEXT HTML

    Working in the garment industry may positively affect children’s education due to income effect. It may also decrease children’s time in school and increase time at work when the parent(s) and/or other adult household members work outside the home. This study explored the effects of parental and other household members’ work in that industry on the education and work of school-age children in Cambodia. The estimated results of the coarsened exact matching analysis revealed that parental work in the garment industry significantly impacts child education and work; in particular, female children are more likely to be in school and less likely to work if their parents are working. In contrast, an adverse effect was found when adult household members worked there; children were less likely to stay in school and more likely to work longer hours. Rural children seem less affected by adult members’ work.

  • Yuji Nagaoka, Atsushi Chitose, Motoi Kusadokoro
    Article type: Short Paper
    2022 Volume 58 Issue 2 Pages 90-97
    Published: June 25, 2022
    Released on J-STAGE: July 01, 2022
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS FULL-TEXT HTML

    The decrease in the number of agricultural workers is a serious issue in Mexico. We hypothesized that migration might push the head of the household to exit from agriculture. The effect differs between farming and non-farming households because the former could increase farm income by devoting part of their remittance income to agricultural production. This study examines the relationship between the migration of household heads and their engagement in agriculture after returning home and their use of agricultural inputs. We found no significant relationship between migration and engagement in farming for farming households but a negative and significant relationship for non-farming households. In addition, we found a positive and significant relationship between migration and input use in farming households. This suggests that migration is likely to cause the exit of household heads from agriculture, but the possibility of increased farm income by purchasing more inputs may mitigate this effect.

  • Eri Nakamoto, Masahiro Toyoda, Toshiko Yamamoto
    Article type: Short Paper
    2022 Volume 58 Issue 2 Pages 98-105
    Published: June 25, 2022
    Released on J-STAGE: July 01, 2022
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS FULL-TEXT HTML

    According to some case studies on good practices, the employment of people with disabilities in agriculture is expected to positively affect agricultural management. However, the results of analysis that clarified the achievements and success factors in detail have not yet been shown in surveys targeting various cases. This study aimed to clarify the relationship between the effects and practices of employment of people with disabilities in agriculture through a questionnaire-based survey of farmers. The main results are as follows: Many of the respondents have enhanced cultivation management, added value to their products, and shortened the cultivation time for owners after hiring people with disabilities. These effects were mainly related to practical experience in agriculture-welfare collaborations, the number of people with disabilities employed, and the degree of improvement in the working environment.

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