Anthropological Science
Online ISSN : 1348-8570
Print ISSN : 0918-7960
ISSN-L : 0918-7960
Volume 107 , Issue 1
Showing 1-7 articles out of 7 articles from the selected issue
  • 1999 Volume 107 Issue 1 Pages 1
    Published: March 15, 1999
    Released: October 21, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • Yousuke Kaifu
    1999 Volume 107 Issue 1 Pages 3-24
    Published: March 15, 1999
    Released: October 21, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Temporal changes in alveolar prognathism and anterior protrusion of the anterior teeth were examined using adult Japanese skeletal materials from the following periods: Jomon, Yayoi, protohistoric Kofun, early medieval Kamakura, late medieval Muromachi, early modern Edo, and Recent.These samples are mainly from the Kanto region except for the Yayoi which derives from the northern Kyushu and Yamaguchi regions and the Recent whose geological origin is unknown.
    The results indicated the existence of a subtle but nearly monotonous increase in alveolar prognathism through time, which is different from the previous interpretation.In contrast, the maxillary anterior teeth showed drastic changes toward a more protrusive condition from the Jomon to Kofun periods.The changes of this trait after the Yayoi period are small but it tends to become stronger through time.Causative factors of changes in anterior teeth protrusion were discussed.
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  • Tsunehiko Hanihara, Yukio Dodo, Osamu Kondo, Takashi Nara, Naomi Doi, ...
    1999 Volume 107 Issue 1 Pages 25-39
    Published: March 15, 1999
    Released: October 21, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    This study examines intra-and interobserver errors in the facial flatness measurements defined by Yamaguchi (1973) using two-way ANOVA with replication.The sample used consists of 10 recent Japanese skulls from Tohoku District.These skulls are measured twice by each of 6 observers.The interactions between skulls and observers are significant in the frontal chord, the simotic subtense, and the zygomaxillary chord.In the latter 2 items, interobserver errors are not significant, suggesting the nature of differences varies from skull to skull.When the among-skull mean squares over the mean squares of total error are tested, they are significant at <0.1% level in all the items.The variance components expressed as percentages of the sum of variances indicate that intraobserver and total error variances are, on average, the largest in the simotic region, the second largest in the frontal region, and the smallest in the zygomaxillary region.On average, however, the variance components of among-skulls are very large in all the items.These indicate that it may be safe to use the facial flatness measurements obtained by different investigators in analyses of population affinities when the morphological differences among the populations are relatively large.The students employing facial flatness measurements in the study of population affinities should, however, pay attention to the measurement errors, especially those of simotic measurements, in interpretation of the biological significance of their results.The results of two-way ANOVA and nested ANOVA are also discussed in terms of the interaction components.
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  • TAGAYA A., MATSUMURA H.
    1999 Volume 107 Issue 1 Pages 42-59
    Published: March 15, 1999
    Released: October 21, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • Tadanao KIMURA, Naoko NONAKA, Kaoru EGAWA, Reiji TAKIGUTI, Seiichiro I ...
    1999 Volume 107 Issue 1 Pages 60-71
    Published: March 15, 1999
    Released: October 21, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • Shuji MATSU'URA, Megumi KONDO, Fachroel AZIZ, SUDI JONO, Naotune WATAN ...
    1999 Volume 107 Issue 1 Pages 72-88
    Published: March 15, 1999
    Released: October 21, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • SHIGEHARA N.
    1999 Volume 107 Issue 1 Pages 89-99
    Published: March 15, 1999
    Released: October 21, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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