Teaching English through movies : ATEM journal
Online ISSN : 2433-1929
Print ISSN : 1342-9914
Volume 14
Showing 1-14 articles out of 14 articles from the selected issue
  • Type: Cover
    2009 Volume 14 Pages Cover1-
    Published: March 25, 2009
    Released: December 09, 2017
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS
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  • Type: Cover
    2009 Volume 14 Pages Cover2-
    Published: March 25, 2009
    Released: December 09, 2017
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (18800K)
  • Type: Appendix
    2009 Volume 14 Pages App1-
    Published: March 25, 2009
    Released: December 09, 2017
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  • Reito Adachi, Shoichi Hasegawa
    Type: Article
    2009 Volume 14 Pages 3-13
    Published: March 25, 2009
    Released: December 09, 2017
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS
    This paper investigates the changes in the number of sentences that occurred during the process of translation of 11 Japanese animation movies and an equal number of American animation movies. A two-way analysis of variance among four groups (i.e., Japanese and English originals and their Japanese- and English-dubbed counterparts) revealed significant differences not only in the main effects of both factors of Japan/USA and original/translation but also in the interactions between them [F(1,20) = 13.860, p = .0013]. An analysis of the simple main effects was then conducted for each dependent variable, revealing significant differences between the number of sentences of Japanese works before translation and that of Japanese works after translation [F(1,20) = 19.338, p = .0003], as well as differences between the number of sentences of Japanese originals and that of American originals [F(1,40) = 13.250, p = .0008]. As evidence to support this tendency, comparisons were made between two English translations of Tenku No Shiro Rapyuta, that is, Laputa: The Flying Castle, which was sold exclusively in Japan, and Castle in the Sky, which was retranslated for foreign markets. These results lead to the conclusion that, when translated, the number of sentences of Japanese animation movies significantly increases to that of American animation movies.
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  • Yoshiyuki Fujie
    Type: Article
    2009 Volume 14 Pages 15-28
    Published: March 25, 2009
    Released: December 09, 2017
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS
    This paper has been developed from my previous thesis "Teaching will in if-clauses through movies" in Teaching English through Movies: Number 8, and it deals with studying and teaching 'implicit if-clauses' through movies. In Japan, when teachers teach English sentences including would, but having no conditional clauses, they tend to explain those sentences by positing 'implicit (subjunctive) if-clauses' or 'suppressed (subjunctive) conditions'. However, we find out numerous would-sentences which have no implicit if-clauses by examining movie scripts. These expressions suggest the speaker's 'distancing' from the immediate reality. The clear situations of film sequences provide teachers and students with an alternative better approach to this semantic subject. Therefore we should use movies to understand and teach the above grammatical points.
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  • Naoki Furuhi
    Type: Article
    2009 Volume 14 Pages 29-40
    Published: March 25, 2009
    Released: December 09, 2017
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS
    This paper examines the relationship between students' incidental vocabulary learning and their proficiency level, between acquisition and word frequency in a text and between word-gain and contextual support when the students see a Japanese movie with the subtitle in English and the audio in Japanese. Participants are Japanese learners of English, the second-graders of a national college of technology called Kosen. They are at the same ages of high school sophomores. The procedures are as follows: First, learners are classified into three proficiency levels. Secondly, learners are subject to vocabulary tests. Then, they take the pretest to be assessed in terms of their comprehension of the words in the movie. Next, the subjects see the movie. After that, they take the post-test identical to the pre-test except for the order of questions. Then, the scores of the pre-test and the post-test are compared for frequency of occurrence and level of contextual support. It is concluded that word acquisition is profoundly affected by its frequency and learners' capability. Contextual support remains in control of frequency of words.
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  • Goro Yamamoto
    Type: Article
    2009 Volume 14 Pages 41-50
    Published: March 25, 2009
    Released: December 09, 2017
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS
    One of the popular methods of using English movie clips in English teaching is through repeating practice. To gain insights in practice using movie clips, this study first discusses a possible risk in the repeating practice by reviewing previous research regarding English teaching using movie clips along with findings in experimental studies on emotion recognition. Second, a common English phrase derived from various scenes in different movies is analyzed with a sound visualization software. The duration in milliseconds and pitch gap in hertz is measured from the pitch contour. The distribution chart on the axes of duration and pitch gap shows the diversity of the prosodic feature of the same phrase. With the marking of the emotion category that each token conveys, the study discusses how the finding should be applied in the repeating practice using movie clips.
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  • Yukari Endo
    Type: Article
    2009 Volume 14 Pages 51-59
    Published: March 25, 2009
    Released: December 09, 2017
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS
    Motivating students is an integral part of language teaching. The use of movies in language classes can interest learners, presenting language comprehensively and realistically (Stempleski & Tomalin, 1990). It is expected that learners are more motivated when the movies used in classes are related to their specialty. This article reports the use of the movie Daddy Day Care in an English course for students majoring in early-childhood education. Dealing with child care, the comedy engages students, and various kinds of activities, such as vocabulary building, speaking, reading and writing, can be organized around the topic. Moreover, they can make good use of their knowledge about child care in language these activities.
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  • Junko Carreira Matsuzaki
    Type: Article
    2009 Volume 14 Pages 61-71
    Published: March 25, 2009
    Released: December 09, 2017
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS
    This paper reports how the author used a movie script in English lessons at a private university. The students, many of whom dislike English, have low motivation to learn English and their proficiency in English was extremely low. The following tasks were conducted: The students watched a scene in Back to the Future and then read the script. Next, they looked up the words and idioms from the scene and wrote them down in their notebooks. At the end of the semester research was conducted by analyzing the students' responses to the questionnaires. Based on the data from the questionnaires, the results revealed that a) the students enjoyed reading the script, b) from the viewpoint of the ARCS motivation model, the lesson designed in this study was favorably evaluated by the students, and c) the lessons using the movie script were effective in enhancing the students' motivation to learn English.
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  • Type: Bibliography
    2009 Volume 14 Pages 116-
    Published: March 25, 2009
    Released: December 09, 2017
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (40K)
  • Type: Bibliography
    2009 Volume 14 Pages 116-
    Published: March 25, 2009
    Released: December 09, 2017
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (40K)
  • Type: Bibliography
    2009 Volume 14 Pages 116-
    Published: March 25, 2009
    Released: December 09, 2017
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (40K)
  • Type: Cover
    2009 Volume 14 Pages Cover3-
    Published: March 25, 2009
    Released: December 09, 2017
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (60K)
  • Type: Cover
    2009 Volume 14 Pages Cover4-
    Published: March 25, 2009
    Released: December 09, 2017
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (60K)
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