Teaching English through movies : ATEM journal
Online ISSN : 2433-1929
Print ISSN : 1342-9914
Volume 16
Showing 1-15 articles out of 15 articles from the selected issue
  • Type: Cover
    2011 Volume 16 Pages Cover1-
    Published: January 30, 2011
    Released: December 09, 2017
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  • Type: Cover
    2011 Volume 16 Pages Cover2-
    Published: January 30, 2011
    Released: December 09, 2017
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (18650K)
  • Type: Appendix
    2011 Volume 16 Pages App1-
    Published: January 30, 2011
    Released: December 09, 2017
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  • Haruhiko NITTA, Hironobu OKAZAKI, Walter KLINGER
    Type: Article
    2011 Volume 16 Pages 5-16
    Published: January 30, 2011
    Released: December 09, 2017
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS
    We examine previous research studies on listening ability and comprehension as it relates to speech speed; in particular, one study that determined that the average speech speed of sentences in English movies was 5.1 syllables per second and that 93.5% of the speech content was spoken at rates up to 7 syllables per second, and another study that verified that even advanced non-native speakers have increasingly serious problems in hearing and identifying both content and function words in sentences from TV shows spoken at increasingly higher speech speeds, as they missed 21.2% of the words spoken at 6 syllables per second and 32.7% at 7 syllables per second. Using the results of the previous studies, we determine a Word Recognition Ratio of 85%, which indicates how much of the speech in a movie advanced non-native speakers might be able to recognize, given opportunities for repeated listening, and given that there is no unknown vocabulary. We find that this is far from an adequate ratio for comprehension. We caution that measuring listening ability is not the same as measuring listening comprehension. We comment on some factors affecting listening ability and comprehension, and remark on some ideas for improving listening skills.
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  • Do Hyung RYU
    Type: Article
    2011 Volume 16 Pages 17-31
    Published: January 30, 2011
    Released: December 09, 2017
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS
    Movies are believed to contain almost everything that English learners need in order to learn communication in English. Most of all, authentic expressions in movies are a very useful source of real conversation. In using movies for teaching English expressions, it is important for teachers to focus on the students themselves. Awareness could be the key element of doing this. Awareness can make students take what they have been taught, that is, the language input, completely understand the input, process it as intake and acquire it. Awareness can connect students with expressions from movies, and thereby connect students with language knowledge. The subtitles could get students' awareness to connect to the expressions from movies. The purpose of this study was to investigate the differences in individual learners, based on their awareness of linguistic and affective characteristics of expressions in movies. The study also investigated how to promote and encourage these differences in order to reinforce student awareness. The procedure was to examine how the participants respond to the activities using film subtitles and with what types of subtitles can the participants get their language awareness.
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  • Naoki FURUHI
    Type: Article
    2011 Volume 16 Pages 33-44
    Published: January 30, 2011
    Released: December 09, 2017
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS
    Learning collocations is a crucial concern in the development of English communications skills. However, learners often feel that collocations are difficult to memorize. Hence, providing more user-friendly learning material for students is necessary. The possibility of teaching basic collocations for Japanese students through movies is investigated using 1,572 basic collocations and a database of movie quotes for 77 famous movies. Three hundred and sixty-two collocations have been included in the database. The movies containing the maximum numbers of collocations are Erin Brockovich, Gosford Park, Anne of Green Gables, Jackie Brown, and Super Size Me. These movies have maximum 31 and minimum 26 kinds of basic collocations, respectively. The collocations appearing in several movies, having been observed in 22 to 54 works, are take care, do thing, take look, do favor, and tell truth. This indicates that using movies does not ensure that there will be a sufficient number of collocations to be presented. Consequently, merely through using movies, teachers cannot present sufficient volume of collocations to be learned. Thus, movies must be used in combination of other teaching materials and learning methods such as word lists and textbooks.
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  • Keiichi ETO
    Type: Article
    2011 Volume 16 Pages 45-53
    Published: January 30, 2011
    Released: December 09, 2017
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS
    This study deals with a certain important aspect of the meanings and the usages of be bound to using extensive data from English movies, in addition to providing a general description of how the semi-modal has been dealt with in previous studies. It is generally assumed that the pheriphrastic form is synonymous with must or the former has a stronger meaning than the latter. These claims, however, do not reflect its actual usage: the quasi-modal is primarily used to show inevitability. To verify this, this study points out that the deontic meaning of be bound to is derived from and related to the passive of the verb bind. The historical perspective provides us a deeper understanding of the semi-modal. This paper also argues that be bound to tend to carry with it negative connotations using the English movie caption database, which contains 801 million words from 978 English films. In the data, cases are identified where be bound to appears with (1) happen, (2) verbs with negative nuances like fail. In the case of happen it should be noted that when used with be bound to the term almost always acquire contextually negative connotations.
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  • Goro YAMAMOTO
    Type: Article
    2011 Volume 16 Pages 55-63
    Published: January 30, 2011
    Released: December 09, 2017
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS
    This study focuses on the meanings and usages of the future progressive by making use of data from various English movies. From the viewpoint of grammar teaching, the study discusses one core meaning-future activity in progress-and two derivational meanings-expectedness and politeness. With the help of various dialogs taken from movies like True Crime, City of Angels, Catch Me If You Can, The Terminal, and some others, the study proposes to separate the two derivational meanings from the core meaning; this is because the future progressive form typically does not retain the sense of progress when it conveys a derivational meaning. The discussion connects the two derivational meanings by shedding light on the common feature between them, that is, the non-focus on the subject's intention. The study also delves into the role of this non-focus on the subject's intention in inducing lessened pressure in questioning and thus assumes the meaning of politeness. A number of movie dialogs that have been used in the study will help illustrate the different meanings and usages of the target future expression. Suggestions for teaching this particular type of future expression using movie clips are also included in the closing statement.
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  • Yuji HAYASHI
    Type: Article
    2011 Volume 16 Pages 65-78
    Published: January 30, 2011
    Released: December 09, 2017
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS
    The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how and why native speakers of English use dysfluencies such as 'er', 'erm', '...' , repeats and repair. Comparison between Kazuo Ishiguro's novel, The Remains of the Day (1989) and its film (1993) reveals that the film has a larger number of dysfluencies and a larger variety of dysfluencies than the novel. Never being at the end of sentences, filled pauses (= um, er, erm) signal that the speaker is still holding the floor. Concordance among hesitation pauses (=...) and filled pauses shows there is no repetition of the same dysfluency. Filled pauses are most frequently followed by ... (pause). Longer concordances, expanded to left 5 and right 5, help us understand that discourse markers such as 'and', 'but', 'well' often collocate with pauses. Several case studies confirm that when you face the need to keep saying what you want to say and plan what to say next at the same time, you hesitate, which implies to your listener that new information is upcoming. The more demanding your need of doing the two different jobs at a time becomes, the less fluently you speak, producing more dysfluencies, discourse markers, and vocatives.
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  • Hirosada IWASAKI
    Type: Article
    2011 Volume 16 Pages 79-90
    Published: January 30, 2011
    Released: December 09, 2017
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS
    This research is composed of two parts. The first part compared three movie-related texts: a) subtitles only, b) scripts with stage directions, and c) their novelized or original texts. The comparison includes such lexical scales as types, tokens, Guiraud index, and Level 1 range based on the JACET 8000 Wordlist. The analysis showed an interesting feature of scripts: usually it is lexically more sophisticated, involving more low-frequency words, than subtitles and novels. This poses a problem for learners because scripts use more sophisticated, therefore more difficult, words. In order to explore the use of scripts in class, the second part of the research showed an experiment carried out to ascertain if learners could guess meanings of low-frequency words with or without a movie clip. The results showed that when a script was used after watching a move, learners were able to guess sophisticated low-frequency words more correctly. Since visual images were already shown to learners, they were able to associate those words more successfully with particular concepts. Therefore, the present research suggests that although a script involves difficult words, it can be positively used after watching a movie possibly as a review exercise to enhance vocabulary.
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  • Junya HIRANO, Tomoko MATSUMOTO
    Type: Article
    2011 Volume 16 Pages 91-103
    Published: January 30, 2011
    Released: December 09, 2017
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS
    The purpose of this study is to discover an effective teaching method of listening comprehension. Assigned to teach Listening classes in the Liberal Arts Curriculum, the authors set a goal; to improve students' listening comprehension using the TOEIC listening test, without disregarding teaching English as a liberal art. The listening class was designed based on two theories: Schema Theory in the field of Applied Linguistics and Communication Theory called Dramatism. Phonetic obstacles in listening comprehension have been investigated in several studies; however, in light of the TOEIC listening test, other obstacles can be found due to students' lack of experiences in certain contexts, such as business and travel settings. In the case of phonetic obstacles, students need to learn terms and phonetic components. In the latter case, the challenge is to teach students contextual knowledge, how to activate the knowledge as schema, and how to infer the content as they listen to the material. Movies are an effective medium that allows students to engage in learning phonetic components while obtaining contextual knowledge easily. The current paper explains the listening class design and TOEIC listening activities with movies, as well as listening activities designed by students.
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  • Type: Appendix
    2011 Volume 16 Pages 150-
    Published: January 30, 2011
    Released: December 09, 2017
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (30K)
  • Type: Appendix
    2011 Volume 16 Pages 150-
    Published: January 30, 2011
    Released: December 09, 2017
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (30K)
  • Type: Cover
    2011 Volume 16 Pages Cover3-
    Published: January 30, 2011
    Released: December 09, 2017
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (58K)
  • Type: Cover
    2011 Volume 16 Pages Cover4-
    Published: January 30, 2011
    Released: December 09, 2017
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (58K)
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