Teaching English through movies : ATEM journal
Online ISSN : 2433-1929
Print ISSN : 1342-9914
Volume 5
Showing 1-10 articles out of 10 articles from the selected issue
  • Type: Cover
    2000 Volume 5 Pages Cover1-
    Published: March 31, 2000
    Released: December 09, 2017
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS
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  • Type: Cover
    2000 Volume 5 Pages Cover2-
    Published: March 31, 2000
    Released: December 09, 2017
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (36K)
  • Type: Appendix
    2000 Volume 5 Pages App1-
    Published: March 31, 2000
    Released: December 09, 2017
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  • Morihiro KUBOTA
    Type: Article
    2000 Volume 5 Pages 3-14
    Published: March 31, 2000
    Released: December 09, 2017
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS
    Movies and their use of captions have been deeply related and developed throughout the long history of the cinematic world. In Japan, the first movie with Japanese captions was "Morocco', produced in America in 1930. When this movie was shown on the screen, the Japanese audience was very surprised and enjoyed the movie whose captions the movie suppliers had never imagined would be such a welcome sight. However, the audience is not conscious of the captions unless the printed captions of the film are in a gap of moving film or they can not be read against the white color of the screen. The caption translator must make every effort to avoid these kinds of mistakes. Strict regulations, such as 10 words of translation on each line, help standardize captions despite the fact that the translation is done for little payment and on very short time table. In this paper, I would like to pick up Baz Lurhmann's movie of Romeo and Juliet, written by William Shakespeare, and study Toda's translation in comparison with other translations such as Shouyu Tsubouchi and some other well-known writers in Japan. In fact in Lurhmann's 1996 film, there are 1,123 sentences as well as 1,099 sentences in Franco Zeffihleri's 1,668 version of Romeo and Juliet on my account. As far as the number of the total captions, there are no differences between them, but we will notice clearly the differences in the two translations. The movie translators always worry about how to express a foreign language into the Japanese language. This is also significant point to be studied and discussed about Japanese movie casptions.
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  • Hisakazu TSUKANO
    Type: Article
    2000 Volume 5 Pages 15-31
    Published: March 31, 2000
    Released: December 09, 2017
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS
    Nowadays Chaos / Complexity Theory is widely accepted in almost all academic domains. In the field of second language acquisition (SLA) as well, this theory seems to provide a very useful framework, especially in relation to interlanguage (IL) . When you feel as if you had attained your target language, it has actually gone to the next stage. Even if this new theory couldn't solve all the problems of applied linguistics, it might offer you a very useful conceptual framework, considering that it has a number of characteristics similar to IL - that is, they are both (1) dynamic, (2) complex, (3) non-linear, (4) open and (5) distinctive. According to the results of the experimental projects this time, a group presentation using a movie turned out to be an efficient way of having students organize themselves into reaching the critical point where they will automatically begin to acquire English skills. In order to facilitate their getting to the edge of chaos or unpredictability, you should think about 5 dimensions of the movies you'd like to show them: (i) entertainment, (2) global issues, (3) students' relationship with the film star (s) , (4) artistic completion, and (5) language clarity. The teacher should not only lead students' fossilized interlanguage grammar to the edge of chaos by means of explicit instruction and negative feedback but also keep on giving them comprehensible input, mainly by explaining how to use the most important expressions in the movies they have taken up.
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  • Mariko BOKU
    Type: Article
    2000 Volume 5 Pages 33-46
    Published: March 31, 2000
    Released: December 09, 2017
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS
    In a global society, acquiring communicative competence is a key in learning English. Listening skill is crucial for understanding people accurately. However, many lower level EFL learners do not know what kind of technique is required for accurate listening. One of the effective ways of developing listening ability is giving learners chances to activate schema or background knowledge. Using movies for listening practice is helpful because it is fun, as movies contain entertaining and authentic text with rich input resource. However, there are some problems in using movies in the language classroom, such as, dealing with length, subtitles, learners' preference and their uncertain cognitive process while watching. To enable learners to be more engaged in watching movies and pay attention to input, schema building tasks were adopted in the classroom. This paper reports research results using two kinds of schema building tasks for comprehending three different movies, which show that better performance on schema building does not necessarily lead to better comprehension.
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  • Wakae MANAKA
    Type: Article
    2000 Volume 5 Pages 47-57
    Published: March 31, 2000
    Released: December 09, 2017
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS
    There are some differences between Japanese subtitles and the English scripts of movies . Those differences stem from the cultures or the mother tongues. It is important to teach those differences and using movies is a very effective way. I chose the movie "Running on Empty" for our third year high school students because some of the situations the hero faces seem to be shared with what my students face at the same age of life. I had students translate some parts of the English script into Japanese so that they could learn the differences between them. My finding is that reading English is not always an uninteresting task for students. Because most of the students liked that movie, they were willing to look up words in the dictionary while they were reading the English script. Students also learned about cultural differences and idioms while comparing the scripts.
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  • Type: Appendix
    2000 Volume 5 Pages App2-
    Published: March 31, 2000
    Released: December 09, 2017
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS
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  • Type: Cover
    2000 Volume 5 Pages Cover3-
    Published: March 31, 2000
    Released: December 09, 2017
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (31K)
  • Type: Cover
    2000 Volume 5 Pages Cover4-
    Published: March 31, 2000
    Released: December 09, 2017
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (31K)
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