Bulletin of the Chemical Society of Japan
Online ISSN : 1348-0634
Print ISSN : 0009-2673
ISSN-L : 0009-2673
Volume 6 , Issue 12
Showing 1-3 articles out of 3 articles from the selected issue
  • Takeo Aono
    1931 Volume 6 Issue 12 Pages 319-324
    Published: 1931
    Released: April 12, 2006
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    (1) It was determened experimentally that the velocity of absorption of CO2 by Ca(OH)2 is proportional to the concentration of CO2 (or partial pressure of CO2) in the air, and to the absorbing capacity of the substance: (Remark: Graphics omitted.) (2) For the change of weight due to the absorption of dry CO2 by dry Ca(OH)2 the following equation was proposed (Remark: Graphics omitted.) and was also experimentally discussed.
  • Mitsumaru Tsujimoto
    1931 Volume 6 Issue 12 Pages 325-337
    Published: 1931
    Released: April 12, 2006
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    (1) As “japanic acid” of Geitel and van der Want appears not the only dibasic acid in Japan wax, this name has been reserved for a while, and the expression of the “Japan wax dibasic acids” or more simply the “dibasic acids” is used in this paper.
    (2) Basing on the difficult solubility of the dibasic acids in petroleum ether, a method for their approximate determination has been proposed. The results obtained by this method show that the content of the dibasic acids in the mixed fatty acids of Japan wax amounts to 5–6%, which are far greater than hitherto considered.
    (3) For the preparative separation of the dibasic acids, the lead salt precipitation method and the ester distillation method have been found to be most convenient.
    (4) As the results of the chemical examination of the dibasic acids, it has been concluded that the main constituent of the acids is heneicosane dicarboxylic acid, C23H44O4, but probably eicosane dicarboxylic acid, C22H42O4 also occurs in a fair proportion.
    (5) As a peculiar property of the dibasic acids, it has been found that the comparatively small addition of them to fatty and waxy substances makes the crystalline structure of these substances finer and more opaque, and at the same time gives certain coherency and tenacity.
    (6) The characteristic property of Japan wax that it may be kneaded to a “mochi”-like mass without adhering to the fingers is due to the presence of the glycerides of the dibasic acids.
  • Mitsumaru Tsujimoto
    1931 Volume 6 Issue 12 Pages 337-341
    Published: 1931
    Released: April 12, 2006
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    (1) The crude dibasic acids in urushi wax amounted to about 63% of the fatty acids. Their chief constituent appeared to be eicosane diearboxylic acid, C22H42O4.
    (2) Yama-hazé and tsuta-urushi waxes also contained the dibasic acids, which amounted respectively to about 1.6 and 6.3% of the fatty acids. They consisted mainly of heneicosane dicarboxylic acid, C23H44O4.
    (3) The fatty acids of yama-urushi wax gave a small amount of a substance of m.p. 102°C. Whether this consisted of the dibasic acids or not, was, however, undecided.
feedback
Top