Bulletin of the Mizunami Fossil Museum
Online ISSN : 2435-0931
Print ISSN : 0385-0900
Volume 46
Displaying 1-7 of 7 articles from this issue
  • Stephen K. Donovan
    2020 Volume 46 Pages 1-4
    Published: 2020
    Released on J-STAGE: March 18, 2022
    RESEARCH REPORT / TECHNICAL REPORT OPEN ACCESS
    There are no surface exposures of Mississippian (Lower Carboniferous) rocks anywhere in the Netherlands, but imported limestones of this age have been used extensively as building stones. These rocks contain a typical biota of Mississippian shelly invertebrates. Corals are common, but their diversity is limited. The first record of a large, solitary rugose coral, Clisiophyllum? sp., is discussed herein, based on a single specimen in a wall of the Cruquius Museum, province of Noord-Holland. The specimen is an oblique section of a solitary rugose coral of circular section, with nu-merous thin, radial septa; dissepiments are poorly seen, but concentric(?), thin and convex towards the circumference; and the axial structure is moderately broad, but poorly visible.
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  • Stephen K. Donovan
    2020 Volume 46 Pages 5-9
    Published: 2020
    Released on J-STAGE: March 18, 2022
    RESEARCH REPORT / TECHNICAL REPORT OPEN ACCESS
    The geological outcrop of the Netherlands is dominated by Pleistocene and Holocene fluvial, wetland, aeolian and glacial deposits. Mississippian fossiliferous limestones have no exposure in situ, but occurrences ex situ are locally common as building stones and street furniture. The most important crinoid-rich limestone among these far-travelled relicts is found in Eindhoven railway station. Here are the only crinoid thecae known of this antiquity in the Netherlands. A transverse section of a theca, filled by calcite spar and thus a crystal apple, is likely a monobathrid camerate. The most complete specimen retains the heteromorphic proxistele, a monocyclic cup and proximal arms; it is a platycrinitid monobathrid camerate. Crinoid(?) sp. indet. may be a theca with arms, but is somewhat disrupted. These are the best-preserved fossil crinoids known from Dutch building stones; exotic imports from abroad (south-central Belgium?), ignored every day by myriad passengers more intent on travel than geology.
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  • Stephen K. Donovan, John W. M. Jagt, Bram W. Langeveld
    2020 Volume 46 Pages 11-15
    Published: 2020
    Released on J-STAGE: March 18, 2022
    RESEARCH REPORT / TECHNICAL REPORT OPEN ACCESS
    Reworked fragments of Mississippian (Early Carboniferous) crinoid columns are a feature of both fluvial systems and glacial deposits in the Netherlands. A pluricolumnal from an unusual situation, the beach of a man-made island in the Marker Wadden archipelago (province of Flevoland, north-central Netherlands), is well preserved for a reworked, much travelled fossil. Distinctive features include: circular section; slightly eccentric, rounded pentagonal lumen; radial symplectial articulation extending from circumference of columnal to lumen edge; pluricolumnal heteromorphic, N212; and latera unsculptured. With a broad axial canal, this specimen is undoubtedly of Palaeozoic and most likely Mississippian age (Lower Carboniferous), and represents either a cladid or monobathrid. The pluricolumnal is from the mesistele; the eccentric axial canal suggests it was close to a recumbent dististele.
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  • Hiroaki Karasawa
    2020 Volume 46 Pages 17-20
    Published: 2020
    Released on J-STAGE: March 18, 2022
    RESEARCH REPORT / TECHNICAL REPORT OPEN ACCESS
    The identify of a poorly known species of a fossil calappid, Paramursia circularis Karasawa, 1989, from the Early–Middle Miocene Mizunami Group of Japan, is herein re-examined. Paramursia circularis is moved to an another calappid Mursiopsis Ristori, 1889. Two calappid genera, Paramursia Karasawa, 1989, and Mursilata Hu and Tao, 1996, are considered as a junior subjective synonym of Mursiopsis. Occurrences of the Miocene species from Japan and Taiwan greatly expand the geographic and geologic range for the genus previously known only from the Early Oligocene of Italy. A revised diagnosis is provided for Paramursia circularis.
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  • Hiroaki Karasawa, Fumio Takahashi
    2020 Volume 46 Pages 21-43
    Published: 2020
    Released on J-STAGE: March 18, 2022
    RESEARCH REPORT / TECHNICAL REPORT OPEN ACCESS
    The cancrid crabs from the Neogene and Quaternary deposits of West Japan are clarified. Mizuhocancer Karasawa, a new monotypic genus is proposed for Cancer? imamurae Imaizumi, 1962, previously assigned to Platepistoma Rathbun, 1906, by Karasawa (1993). Glebocarcinus doii Karasawa and Takahashi, a new species is described from the Early Miocene Igami Formation of southern Honshu. The fossil cancrids known to date from the Late Cenozoic of West Japan consist of 11 species within five genera, Anatolikos japonicus (Ortmann, 1893), A. fujinaensis (Sakumoto, Karasawa, and Takayasu, 1992), new combination, A. itoigawai (Karasawa, 1990), A. tomowoi (Karasawa, 1990), new combination, Glebocarcinus doii Karasawa and Takahashi, new species, G. kaedei Karasawa, 1990, Metacarcinus izumoensis Sakumoto, Karasawa, and Takayasu, 1992, Mizuhocancer imamurae (Imaizumi, 1962), new combination, Romaleon gibbosulum (De Haan, 1833), R. odosense (Imaizumi, 1962), and R. sakamotoi (Kato, 1996).
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  • Hisayoshi Kato, Koshi Kitamura
    2020 Volume 46 Pages 45-56
    Published: 2020
    Released on J-STAGE: March 18, 2022
    RESEARCH REPORT / TECHNICAL REPORT OPEN ACCESS
    Ten species of decapod crustaceans are described from the middle Pleistocene Sahama Mud Member of the Hamamatsu Formation, Shizuoka Prefecture, central Japan. The decapod assemblage is dominated by Raphidopus ciliatus Stimpson, 1858, Asthenognathus inaequipes Stimpson, 1858, and Mariaplax sp. Occurrence of Xenophthalmus sp. is not only the first fossil record from Japan but the second fossil evidence for the genus. Raphidopus ciliatus extends the known geologic range into the middle Pleistocene of Japan.
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  • Takashi Matsubara, Azusa Kumooka
    2020 Volume 46 Pages 57-102
    Published: 2020
    Released on J-STAGE: March 18, 2022
    RESEARCH REPORT / TECHNICAL REPORT OPEN ACCESS
    The “Kansō-Roku”, written by KŌUN-DŌ Kanpo (pseudonym), is known as a sole woodcut fossil shell book in the Yedo Period. First, we reprinted the full-text and translated the major parts in modern language. Then, we studied this book from the view-points of paleontology and Japanese literature. As the result of the present study, the following matters have been clarified: 1) The introduction by KIUCHI Sekitei was written at demand by request from a certain fossil enthusiast SHŌHŌ-DŌ Keizan of the Owari Prov. 2) The identity of Kanpo is TAKEUCHI Sōsuke (?–1816), a haikai poet and a headman of Matsubara Village in the Sanuki Prov. 3) 112 lots of specimens mainly from the Permian to Pleistocene formations are illustrated. 4) Donners of fossil specimens are considered to include members of the “Rōseki-Sha” hosted by Sekitei, Keizan’s acquaintances, and Kanpo’s friends. 5) The included poems are mostly written on bamboos and autumn. 6) There are only five common persons between fossil donners and poem writers. 7) The “Kansō-Roku” is a “chimera” book between an illustrated fossil shell book and a collection of poems. 8) The “Kansō-Roku” is probably a commemorative publication of Kanpo’s receiving the privilege of wearing a pair of swords (“Taitō-Gomen”) in 1804.
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