The NHK Monthly Report on Broadcast Research
Online ISSN : 2433-5622
Print ISSN : 0288-0008
ISSN-L : 0288-0008
Volume 70 , Issue 1
The NHK Monthly Report on Broadcast Research
Showing 1-4 articles out of 4 articles from the selected issue
  • Findings from the July 2019 Public Opinion Survey on the Tokyo 2020 Olympic and Paralympic Games [The Fifth Survey]
    Takanobu Saito
    2020 Volume 70 Issue 1 Pages 2-25
    Published: 2020
    Released: February 20, 2020
    RESEARCH REPORT / TECHNICAL REPORT FREE ACCESS
    Findings from the July 2019 Public Opinion Survey on the Tokyo 2020 Olympic and Paralympic Games [The Fifth Survey] The Public Opinion Survey on the Tokyo 2020 Olympic and Paralympic Games is a longitudinal survey series that has been conducted since 2016 with the aim of clarifying public interests in the 2020 Olympics and Paralympics including expectations and concerns as well as requests for broadcasting services. This paper reports the findings from the fifth survey held in July 2019. There is only a year to go, but little change is found in terms of general interests in the Games. About 80 percent of the respondents are interested (“very much” or “somewhat”) in the coming Olympics, and about 60 percent in the Paralympics; the figures have been consistent since the first survey. The evaluation on preparation shows a notable change from the first survey. In the first survey, 80 percent made negative evaluation, saying the preparation is “not going well,“ but those answering “going well“ increased every time the survey was conducted, and the figures are markedly reversed in the latest survey, with about 70% thinking the preparation is “going well.“ However, regarding specific matters, those worrying about “heat countermeasures for the athletes and spectators“ have increased to almost a half from the third survey. In terms of the broadcast coverage of the Tokyo 2020 Olympics, more people have expectations online services (“catch-up service,” “simulcasting of TV coverage on the internet,” and “provision of information on mobile terminals”) than in the first survey. As of now, with a year to go, only a small portion of the respondents partake in activities related to the Olympics or the Paralympics or feel involved in them through business or other opportunities.
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  • From the 2018 Time Use Survey on Media Use [Part2]
    Masayo Yoshifuji, Yoko Watanabe
    2020 Volume 70 Issue 1 Pages 26-45
    Published: 2020
    Released: February 20, 2020
    RESEARCH REPORT / TECHNICAL REPORT FREE ACCESS
    This second report of the 2018 Time Use Survey on Media Use focuses on the use of smartphones, especially by young people (ages 16 through 29), to present the details of the usage and explore the relations between the specific usage of the phones and the awareness of it. First, the result of the diary style survey shows young men ages 16 through 29 spend much time on social media, videos, games, and music on the smartphone. Meanwhile, women ages 16 through 29 spend much time on social media, followed by videos, and less time on others, compared to the above two media activities. Supplementary questions find the difference between young people and middle-aged people. The latter uses smartphones for media activities such as sending emails and online search as a replacement for the  conventional usage of personal computer. On the contrary, young people use smartphones for relatively new services such as “social media” and “videos,” and access multiple social media networks for various purposes such as “search and information collection,” “viewing videos,” and “watching news.” Furthermore, the authors surveyed whether they “found themselves being obsessed, forgetting the time” when using the smartphone or “felt after using the phone that they had wasted time,” based on which the characteristics of smartphone usage by the awareness on the above situation were studied. It is revealed the percentage of those who have such a feeling is high among young people, who actively use smartphones, and low among middle-aged and elderly people. Many of the outcomes suggest that the quantity of smartphone usage is linked to the presence or the absence of such awareness, but this does not necessarily apply to every element, which tells that the awareness and the usage cannot simply be correlated.
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  • Examining the Essence of VR from “Kasou” (仮想), the Japanese Translation of “Virtual”
    Takuo Tani
    2020 Volume 70 Issue 1 Pages 46-58
    Published: 2020
    Released: February 20, 2020
    RESEARCH REPORT / TECHNICAL REPORT FREE ACCESS
    Business, education, entertainment and other diverse fields have started utilizing virtual reality (VR) as a cutting-edge technology. The term “kasou genjitsu” has taken hold as the Japanese translation of VR. However, the translation, especially “kasou” for “virtual,” has been receiving criticism mainly from VR researchers as being inappropriate. The author is also uncomfortable about this rendition, “kasou” “genjitsu,” given the technological advancement that blurs the boundary between the world created by VR and the reality. For that reason, the author investigated why such a translation has come to be used. The term “VR” was coined in the United States in 1989, but “kasou” had been used for “virtual” for some occasions before that. This is said to be greatly attributed to the translation of “virtual storage” in 1972, when IBM Japan marketed this latest technology of the time as “kasou kioku souchi.” Further back in the Meiji era (1868 to 1912), the word “virtual” was found among academic terms from the Western world, and physicists at the time translated this new concept freely as “karini,” “kyo,” and “kasou,” even though they knew those terms departed from the original meaning. This was presumably the starting point. By tracing back the history of the translation of “virtual” and considering the meaning, the author examines the essence of VR that may significantly change the world in the future.
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  • Daisuke Miyagawa
    2020 Volume 70 Issue 1 Pages 60-63
    Published: 2020
    Released: February 20, 2020
    RESEARCH REPORT / TECHNICAL REPORT FREE ACCESS
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