official journal of Congeital Anomalies Research Association of Japan
Online ISSN : 2433-1503
Print ISSN : 0037-2285
Volume 45 , Issue 4
Congenital Anomalies
Showing 1-15 articles out of 15 articles from the selected issue
  • 2005 Volume 45 Issue 4 Pages A1-A15
    Published: 2005
    Released: August 07, 2021
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  • 2005 Volume 45 Issue 4 Pages A17-A63
    Published: 2005
    Released: August 07, 2021
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  • 2005 Volume 45 Issue 4 Pages 107-118
    Published: 2005
    Released: August 07, 2021
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    ABSTRACT  The heart is the first organ to form and function during development. In the pregastrula chick embryo, cells contributing to the heart are found in the postero-lateral epiblast. During the pregastrula stages, interaction between the posterior epiblast and hypoblast is required for the anterior lateral plate mesoderm (ALM) to form, from which the heart will later develop. This tissue interaction is replaced by an Activin-like signal in culture. During gastrulation, the ALM is committed to the heart lineage by endoderm-secreted BMP and subsequently differentiates into cardiomyocyte. The right and left precardiac mesoderms migrate toward the ventral midline to form the beating primitive heart tube. Then, the heart tube generates a right-side bend, and the d-loop and presumptive heart segments begin to appear segmentally: outflow tract (OT), right ventricle, left ventricle, atrioventricular (AV) canal, atrium and sinus venosus. T-box transcription factors are involved in the formation of the heart segments: Tbx5 identifies the left ventricle and Tbx20 the right ventricle. After the formation of the heart segments, endothelial cells in the OT and AV regions transform into mesenchyme and generate valvuloseptal endocardial cushion tissue. This phenomenon is called endocardial EMT (epithelial-mesenchymal transformation) and is regulated mainly by BMP and TGFβ. Finally, heart septa that have developed in the OT, ventricle, AV canal and atrium come into alignment and fuse, resulting in the completion of the four-chambered heart. Altered development seen in the cardiogenetic process is involved in the pathogenesis of congenital heart defects. Therefore, understanding the molecular nature regulating the ‘nodal point’ during heart development is important in order to understand the etiology of congenital heart defects, as well as normal heart development.
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  • 2005 Volume 45 Issue 4 Pages 119-124
    Published: 2005
    Released: August 07, 2021
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    ABSTRACT  The objective of this investigation was to describe the epidemiology of anotia and microtia with respect to various factors. The cases studied were all infants and fetuses with anotia or microtia identified by a population-based birth defects registry in Hawaii. The anotia and microtia rates were determined for selected factors and comparisons made among the subgroups by calculating the rate ratio (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI). A total of 120 cases were identified, for a rate of 3.79 per 10 000 live births. The anotia and microtia rate increased during 1986–2002, although the trend was not significant (P = 0.715). Of 49 specific structural birth defects examined, four were found to be significantly more common in the presence of anotia and microtia. When compared with Caucasians, the anotia and microtia rates were higher among Far East Asians (RR 1.79, 95% CI 0.89–3.68), Pacific Islanders (RR 2.26, 95% CI 1.24–4.32), and Filipinos (RR 2.34, 95% CI 1.23–4.64). The defects were less common among females (RR 0.64, 95% CI 0.43–0.93) and more common with multiple birth (RR 3.72, 95% CI 1.66–7.33), birth weight < 2500 g (RR 3.35, 95% CI 2.04–5.30), and gestational age <38 weeks (RR 2.27, 95% CI 1.49–3.40). In conclusion, the rate for anotia and microtia increased in Hawaii during the study period. The rates for only a few structural birth defects were substantially greater than expected in association with anotia and microtia. Anotia and microtia rates varied significantly according to maternal race/ethnicity, infant sex, plurality, birth weight, and gestational age.
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  • 2005 Volume 45 Issue 4 Pages 125-131
    Published: 2005
    Released: August 07, 2021
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    ABSTRACT  Mutations in the CREBBP (CREB-binding protein gene) cause Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RSTS). At present, however, genetic testing of CREBBP is not commonly applied in clinical settings because the currently available assays are technically and financially demanding, mainly because of the size of the gene. In the present study, we took advantage of a highly sensitive and specific, automated denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) technique. First, we developed a DHPLC-based protocol to analyze the entire coding region of CREBBP. Second, we analyzed genetic samples from 21 RSTS patients using DHPLC. The coding region was amplified by 41 primer pairs, all of which have the same cycling conditions, aliquoted on a 96-well format PCR plate. In this manner, all the exons were simultaneously amplified using a single block in a PCR machine. We then wrote a computer script to analyze all the PCR amplicons generated from various portions of the CREBBP gene in a serial manner at optimized conditions determined individually for each amplicon. Heterozygous CREBBP mutations were identified in 12 of the 21 patients: five frameshift mutations, three nonsense mutations, two splice-site mutations, and two missense mutations. The resulting detection rate of 57% was comparable to the outcome of previous studies. The relatively high detection rate in the present study demonstrates the enhanced sensitivity of the DHPLC-based mutation analysis, as exemplified by mutation analyses of other genes. The implementation of similar methodologies for other dysmorphic syndromes will help medical geneticists to confirm their clinical impressions and to provide accurate genetic counseling for patients and their families.
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  • 2005 Volume 45 Issue 4 Pages 132-136
    Published: 2005
    Released: August 07, 2021
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    ABSTRACT  Non-treated homozygous polydactyly/arhinencephaly (Pdn/Pdn) mouse fetuses exhibited exencephaly in 16.7% of cases. Treatment of Pdn/Pdn mice with 350 mg/kg of valproic acid (VPA) on days 8.5 and 9.5 of gestation increased the rate of exencephaly to 66.7%. The responsible gene for the Pdn mouse phenotype has been determined to be Gli3, and the suppression of Gli3 gene expression has been documented in Pdn/Pdn embryos. We investigated how the sonic hedgehog (Shh) and Fgf8 genes, the correlated genes of Gli3, are expressed in the VPA-treated exencephalic Pdn/Pdn embryos on day 10 of gestation, using whole mount in situ hybridization (WISH) and real-time PCR methods. We could not detect any alterations in Shh expression by real-time PCR, or WISH in the non-treated Pdn/Pdn and VPA-treated exencephalic Pdn/Pdn embryos. Altered Fgf8 expression patterns were observed in the commissural plate and dorsal isthmal neuroepithelium in the non-treated Pdn/Pdn embryos. We speculated that the altered expression of Fgf8 might be the result of down-regulation of Gli3 in Pdn/Pdn embryos. Fgf8 gene expression in the commissural plate and dorsal isthmal neuroepithelium exhibits wide or altered signal patterns in the VPA-treated exencephalic Pdn/Pdn embryo. From these findings, it was suggested that down-regulation of Gli3 gene expression induced the altered expression of Fgf8 in the Pdn/Pdn embryos, and that VPA treatment accelerated the alterations of Fgf8 gene expression in the Pdn/Pdn embryos. It was further speculated that altered expression of Fgf8 in the commissural plate may be the fundamental cause of exencephaly, and that the synergistic effect between gene and drug shown in this experiment may explain the differences of sensitivity in the side-effects of the drug.
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  • 2005 Volume 45 Issue 4 Pages 137-145
    Published: 2005
    Released: August 07, 2021
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    ABSTRACT  To elucidate the comparative susceptibility of newborn rats to chemicals, newborn and young animals were administered six industrial chemicals by gavage from postnatal days (PND) 4 to 21, and for 28 days starting at 5–6 weeks of age respectively, under the same experimental conditions as far as possible. As two new toxicity endpoints specific to this comparative analysis, presumed no-observed-adverse-effect-levels (pNOAELs) were estimated based on results of both main and dose-finding studies, and presumed unequivocally toxic levels (pUETLs) were also decided. pNOAELs for newborn and young rats were 40 and 200 for 2-chlorophenol, 100 and 100 for 4-chlorophenol, 30 and 100 for p-(α,α-dimethylbenzyl) phenol, 100 and 40 for (hydroxyphenyl)methyl phenol, 60 and 12 for trityl chloride, and 100 and 300 mg/kg/day for 1,3,5-trihydroxybenezene, respectively. To determine pUETLs, dose ranges were adopted in several cases because of the limited results of experimental doses. Values for newborn and young rats were thus estimated as 200–250 and 1000 for 2-chlorophenol, 300 and 500 for 4-chlorophenol, 300 and 700–800 for p-(α,α-dimethylbenzyl) phenol, 140–160 and 1000 for (hydroxyphenyl)methyl phenol, 400–500 and 300 for trityl chloride, and 500 and 1000 mg/kg/day for 1,3,5-trihydroxybenzene, respectively. In most cases, newborn rats were 2–5 times more susceptible than young rats in terms of both the pNOAEL and the pUETL. An exception was that young rats were clearly more susceptible than their newborn counterparts for trityl chloride.
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  • 2005 Volume 45 Issue 4 Pages 146-153
    Published: 2005
    Released: August 07, 2021
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    ABSTRACT  In order to determine the susceptibility of newborn rats to 2-tert-butylphenol (2TBP) and 2,4-di-tert-butylphenol (DTBP) toxicity, studies were conducted with oral administration from postnatal days (PND) 4 to 21 and the findings were compared with results for young rats exposed from 5 or 6 weeks of age for 28 days. In the newborn rats, specific effects on physical and sexual development and reflex ontogeny were not observed. While there were no clear differences in toxicological profiles between newborn and young rats, the no-observed-adverse-effect levels (NOAELs) differed markedly. For 2TBP, clinical signs such as ataxic gait, decrease in locomotor activity and effects on liver, such as increase in organ weight, were observed and the NOAELs were concluded to be 20 and 100 mg/kg/day in newborn and young rats, respectively. Based on hepatic and renal toxicity (histopathological changes and increase in organ weight with blood biochemical changes), the respective NOAELs for DTBP were concluded to be 5 and 20 mg/kg/day. Therefore, the susceptibility of newborn rats to 2TBP and DTBP was found to be 4–5 times higher than that of young rats.
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  • 2005 Volume 45 Issue 4 Pages 154-156
    Published: 2005
    Released: August 07, 2021
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    ABSTRACT  We present a fetus with progressive massive subcutaneous lymphangiomas leading to intrauterine death. A 28-year-old woman was referred to our hospital because of a precordial cystic mass of the fetus. An ultrasound revealed lymphangiomas extending from bilateral axillae to the anterior chest wall. At 18 weeks’ gestation, amniocentesis was performed and the karyotype of the fetus was found to be normal 46, XY. Thereafter the lesions increased in size gradually and spread over the body. Amniotic fluid decreased, pericardial, and pleural effusion appeared, and cardiomegaly became evident. The fetus died in utero at 25 weeks’ gestation. Postmortem examination revealed a male fetus surrounded with multicystic soft masses spreading over the body, and syndactyly (left third and fourth fingers) was present. Histologically, a number of irregularly dilated lymphatics extended through subcutaneous tissues to the skeletal muscles. No communications between the cysts and the thoracic or abdominal cavity existed, and no lymphatic dilations in the viscera were confirmed. As far as we know, such conditions have rarely been reported. Considering that in previous literature, a favorable prognosis of a fetus with an atypically located (lateral cervical or non-cervical) lymphangioma with a normal karyotype has been reported, our case may be included in a distinct pathological entity. When we find a lymphangioma in a fetus, careful follow-up by ultrasound is mandatory.
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  • 2005 Volume 45 Issue 4 Pages 157-160
    Published: 2005
    Released: August 07, 2021
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    ABSTRACT  We report a case of large cystic adenomatoid malformation of the lung (CCAM), which occupied almost the entire left lung with a prominent mediastinal shift at 24 weeks of gestation. The volume of the lesion, determined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), was 27.0 cm3. Subsequent MRI and ultrasound examinations revealed a spontaneous resolution of the lesion at 32 and 36 weeks of gestation without a mediastinal shift, when the lesion volume was 12.8 cm3 and 5.6 cm3, respectively. At 37 weeks of gestation, a mature male baby weighing 2638 g with an Apgar score of 7 was delivered by elective cesarean section. A lobectomy of the left upper lobe of the lung was carried out at 3 days of age, due to an enlargement of the CCAM after birth.
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  • 2005 Volume 45 Issue 4 Pages 161-164
    Published: 2005
    Released: August 07, 2021
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    ABSTRACT  A stillborn baby with multiple malformations, including cardiac defects and cerebellar hypoplasia, is described. The abnormal features were ascribed to an unbalanced chromosome translocation, resulting in a partial deletion of the short arm of chromosome 5 and a partial trisomy of the short arm of chromosome 20. A parental balanced translocation t(5; 20)(p13.3; p11.23) was identified. The present case is the first case in Japan of monosomy of the short arm of chromosome 5 and trisomy of the short arm of chromosome 20.
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  • 2005 Volume 45 Issue 4 Pages 165-166
    Published: 2005
    Released: August 07, 2021
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  • 2005 Volume 45 Issue 4 Pages 167-169
    Published: 2005
    Released: August 07, 2021
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  • 2005 Volume 45 Issue 4 Pages 170
    Published: 2005
    Released: August 07, 2021
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  • 2005 Volume 45 Issue 4 Pages 171-174
    Published: 2005
    Released: August 07, 2021
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