official journal of Congeital Anomalies Research Association of Japan
Online ISSN : 2433-1503
Print ISSN : 0037-2285
Volume 54 , Issue 1
Congenital Anomalies
Showing 1-10 articles out of 10 articles from the selected issue
  • 2014 Volume 54 Issue 1 Pages 1-7
    Published: 2014
    Released: August 20, 2021
    JOURNAL OPEN ACCESS
    Abstract In the last several decades, developmental biology has clarified the molecular mechanisms of embryogenesis and organogenesis. In particular, it has demonstrated that the “tool-kit genes” essential for regulating developmental processes are not only highly conserved among species, but are also used as systems at various times and places in an organism to control distinct developmental events. Therefore, mutations in many of these tool-kit genes may cause congenital diseases involving morphological abnormalities. This link between genes and abnormal morphological phenotypes underscores the importance of understanding how cells behave and contribute to morphogenesis as a result of gene function. Recent improvements in live imaging and in quantitative analyses of cellular dynamics will advance our understanding of the cellular pathogenesis of congenital diseases associated with aberrant morphologies. In these studies, it is critical to select an appropriate model organism for the particular phenomenon of interest.
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  • 2014 Volume 54 Issue 1 Pages 8-11
    Published: 2014
    Released: August 20, 2021
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    Abstract Zebrafish is a popular model vertebrate because of its conservation of a significant number of morphological and physiological processes in vertebrate organogenesis. A number of zebrafish mutants isolated from chemical mutagenesis screens exhibit characterized morphological defects that often resemble the symptoms of human genetic disorders. Recent innovations in genome-editing technologies, such as transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALEN) and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 system, enable us to investigate the loss-of-function phenotypes of developmentally regulated genes in zebrafish. This review highlights recent advances in reverse genetic technologies for zebrafish and presents possible applications of zebrafish for the study of human genetic disorders.
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  • 2014 Volume 54 Issue 1 Pages 12-21
    Published: 2014
    Released: August 20, 2021
    JOURNAL OPEN ACCESS
    Abstract The human genome harbors approximately 2000 genes that encode microRNAs (miRNAs), small non-coding RNAs of approximately 20–22 nt that mediate post-transcriptional gene silencing. MiRNAs are generated from long transcripts through stepwise processing by the Drosha/DGCR8, Exportin-5/RanGTP and Dicer/TRBP complexes. Given that the expression of each individual miRNA is tightly regulated, the altered expression of certain miRNAs plays a pivotal role in human diseases. For instance, germline and somatic mutations in the genes encoding the miRNA processing machinery have been reported in different cancers. Furthermore, certain miRNA genes are encoded within regions that are deleted or duplicated in individuals with chromosomal abnormalities, and the fact that the knockout of these miRNAs in animal models results in lethality or the abnormal development of certain tissues indicates that these miRNA genes contribute to the disease phenotypes. It has also been reported that mutations in miRNA genes or in miRNA-binding sites, which result in the impairment of tight regulation of target mRNA expression, cause human genetic diseases, although these cases are rare. This is in contrast to the aberrant expression of certain miRNAs that results from the impairment of transcriptional or post-transcriptional regulation, which has been reported frequently in various human diseases. The present review focuses on human diseases caused by mutations in genes encoding miRNAs and the miRNA processing machinery as well as in miRNA-binding sites. Furthermore, human diseases caused by chromosomal abnormalities that involve the deletion or duplication of regions harboring genes that encode miRNAs or the miRNA processing machinery are also introduced.
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  • 2014 Volume 54 Issue 1 Pages 22-29
    Published: 2014
    Released: August 20, 2021
    JOURNAL OPEN ACCESS
    Abstract The mandatory notification of patients (“cases”) with different congenital abnormalities (CAs) diagnosed from birth until the end of the first postnatal year by medical doctors was ordered by the Ministry of Health in Hungary in 1962 and this CA-registry was continued as the Hungarian Congenital Abnormality Registry (HCAR) based on the international recommendation from 1970. The primary objective of the HCAR has been to determine the baseline birth prevalence rate of different CAs as reliably as possible, with three secondary objectives: (i) to detect temporal and/or spatial clusters of CAs; (ii) to evaluate increasing or decreasing time trends of CAs; and (iii) to assist in the planning of medical and social services for children and families affected by CA so that appropriate resources are allocated efficiently and effectively. This paper summarizes the activities and the evolution of the HCAR over the past 50 years (1962–2011) including the Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance of Congenital Abnormalities for postmarketing surveillance of drug teratogenicity and prevention of CAs; the special evaluation of unidentified multiple CAs; the Hungarian Surveillance of Germinal Mutations and several international collaborations. In conclusion, Hungary enjoyed optimal conditions for the HCAR due to a centralized state health system; all deliveries took place in inpatient clinics; the quality of pediatric care was high and pediatricians notified most CAs. Autopsy was mandatory in infant death, the staff of the HCAR did not consider this CA-registry only as a statistical system but the Hungarian Center for Congenital Anomaly Control and the Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance of Congenital Abnormalities based on the HCAR worked with close collaboration with the parents in order to promote the possible good quality of life of their affected children and to prevent their risk of recurrence.
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  • 2014 Volume 54 Issue 1 Pages 30-34
    Published: 2014
    Released: August 20, 2021
    JOURNAL OPEN ACCESS
    Abstract We analyzed the role of maternal C677T mutation in methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene on spina bifida development in newborns. A total of 115 mothers who had given birth to a spina bifida child (SB mothers) gave 10 mL of blood together with written informed consent. The genotype distribution of C677T mutation was assessed and compared with that of the 4517 control individuals. The prevalence of the homozygous genotype (TT) among SB mothers was not significantly different from that among the controls (odds ratio [OR] = 0.65; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.31–1.25; P = 0.182), suggesting that MTHFR 677TT genotype in Japan is not associated with spina bifida development in newborns. The T allele frequency was not increased in SB mothers (34.8%) as compared to that of the control individuals (38.2%). Further, the internationally reported association between the two groups was found to be similar in all 15 countries studied except the Netherlands, where the TT genotype was found to be a genetic risk factor for spina bifida. For the prevention of affected pregnancy every woman planning to conceive has to take folic acid supplements 400 μg a day and the government is asked to take action in implementing food fortification with folic acid in the near future. In conclusion, it is not necessary for Japanese women to undergo genetic screening C677T mutation of the MTHFR gene as a predictive marker for spina bifida prior to pregnancy, because the TT genotype is not a risk factor for having an affected infant.
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  • 2014 Volume 54 Issue 1 Pages 35-40
    Published: 2014
    Released: August 20, 2021
    JOURNAL OPEN ACCESS
    Abstract To reduce the incidence of infants with congenital infections, women should be aware of and know prevention measures against maternal infection with mother-to-child infections during pregnancy. Our objective was to assess the awareness of and knowledge about mother-to-child infections in Japanese pregnant women. A survey of 343 Japanese pregnant women was completed. Awareness of 13 pathogens capable of mother-to-child transmission was surveyed. Knowledge about the transmission route, the most susceptible time of infection that may cause severe fetal disease during pregnancy, and methods to prevent maternal infection were investigated for four major pathogens (cytomegalovirus, rubella virus, Toxoplasma gondii, and parvovirus B19) and results were compared between these pathogens. The proportion of women aware of pathogens concerning TORCH syndrome was the following: rubella virus 76%, Treponema pallidum 69%, Toxoplasma gondii 58%, parvovirus B19 28%, herpes simplex virus 27%, and cytomegalovirus 18%. Only 8% knew how cytomegalovirus is transmitted, and only 12% knew how parvovirus B19 is transmitted; both were significantly lower than those who knew transmission routes for rubella virus or Toxoplasma gondii. The proportion of women who knew the most susceptible time for severe fetal infection by maternal acquisition of cytomegalovirus, Toxoplasma gondii, or parvovirus B19 was significantly lower than that for rubella virus. The vast majority of surveyed women were not aware of methods to prevent maternal infection with cytomegalovirus or parvovirus B19. In conclusion, current awareness of and knowledge about cytomegalovirus and parvovirus B19 infection are low in Japanese pregnant women.
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  • 2014 Volume 54 Issue 1 Pages 41-53
    Published: 2014
    Released: August 20, 2021
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    Abstract The effects of thalidomide on the embryo-fetal development (EFD) of rabbit fetuses and the sensitive periods (SP) for the various malformations were compared between Kbl:JW and Kbl:NZW rabbits to investigate possible strain differences. The post-implantation loss rate and number of placental remnants were increased and the number of live fetuses was decreased in both of the strains in the EFD study and in Kbl:NZW at 300 mg/kg dosed on GD 7–8 in the SP study. In the external and skeletal examinations, head, limb and tail malformations were observed in both the strains in the EFD and SP studies at the same dose levels in the same dosing period. In the visceral examination, hydrocephaly, cardiovascular malformations, absent pulmonary intermedial lobe, diaphragmatic hernia and/or abnormal liver lobation were also observed in both of the strains in the EFD and SP studies at the same dose levels and in the same dosing period. Plasma concentrations of thalidomide were equivalent between the two strains in the SP study. There were strain differences in some parameters, such as the post-implantation loss rate and the frequencies of malformations in forelimb and hindlimb and pulmonary intermedial lobe, but similar types of malformations or variations were induced at the same dose levels on the same dosing period in both strains. Therefore, it is concluded that there were no essential differences in sensitivity of the fetuses to thalidomide between Kbl:JW and NZW rabbits and both of the strains are useful to evaluate the teratogenic effects of thalidomide.
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  • 2014 Volume 54 Issue 1 Pages 54-62
    Published: 2014
    Released: August 20, 2021
    JOURNAL OPEN ACCESS
    Abstract Thalidomide (TM) induces limb defects in humans and some animal species including rabbits. Although the mechanism of TM-induced limb defects has been investigated for a long period, the limb development-related genes expressions have not been vigorously characterized in rabbits. In this study, we investigated the Fgf8, Bmp4 and Hoxa11 expressions in TM-treated JW rabbit embryos on gestation days (GDs) 10, 11 and 12 by whole mount in situ hybridization. On GDs 10 and 11, growth retardation of the embryo was induced by TM treatment. The Fgf8 expression lengths on GDs 10 and 11 in the forelimb bud were significantly or tended to be decreased in the TM-treated embryos, which was correlated to the growth retardation and was not considered to be directly relevant to the teratogenic effect of TM in the forelimb. The TM-induced characteristic changes in the expression pattern of Hoxa11 and Bmp4 on GDs 10 and/or 11 were not noted. On GD 12, TM-induced growth retardation was not noted and the Fgf8 and Bmp4 expressions were not changed. On the contrary, Hoxa11 expression was narrowed at the anterior region, which was located on the radial side, and was not changed at the middle and posterior regions in the forelimb bud and in all regions in the hindlimb bud. Because the radius malformations were induced by TM treatment, we concluded the decrease in the Hoxa11 expression was related to the TM-induced limb defects and can be a good marker for early prediction of the teratogenic effect of TM.
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  • 2014 Volume 54 Issue 1 Pages 63-66
    Published: 2014
    Released: August 20, 2021
    JOURNAL OPEN ACCESS
    Abstract Follistatin-like 5 (Fstl5), a member of the follistatin family of genes, encodes a secretory glycoprotein. Previous studies revealed that other members of this family including Fstl1 and Fstl3 play an essential role in development, homeostasis, and congenital disorders. However, the in vivo function of Fstl5 is poorly understood. To gain insight into the function of Fstl5 in the mouse central nervous system, we examined the Fstl5 expression pattern in the adult mouse brain. The results of in situ hybridization analysis showed a highly restricted pattern of Fstl5, namely, with localization in the olfactory system, hippocampal CA3 area and granular cell layer of the cerebellum. Restricted expression in the olfactory system suggests a possible role for Fstl5 in maintaining odor perception.
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  • 2014 Volume 54 Issue 1 Pages 67-68
    Published: 2014
    Released: August 20, 2021
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