GEOGRAPHICAL SCIENCES
Online ISSN : 2432-096X
Print ISSN : 0286-4886
ISSN-L : 0286-4886
Volume 41 , Issue 3
Showing 1-29 articles out of 29 articles from the selected issue
  • Type: Cover
    1986 Volume 41 Issue 3 Pages Cover1-
    Published: 1986
    Released: April 20, 2017
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  • Type: Cover
    1986 Volume 41 Issue 3 Pages Cover2-
    Published: 1986
    Released: April 20, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    1986 Volume 41 Issue 3 Pages App1-
    Published: 1986
    Released: April 20, 2017
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  • Ahusaku NAKAMURA
    Type: Article
    1986 Volume 41 Issue 3 Pages 133-149
    Published: 1986
    Released: April 20, 2017
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    The aim of this study is to clarify the formation of peddling system and its development in Fish produsing area. The results obtained from the case study in Sanmiura, Hagi-city are summarized as follows : 1. The development of the peddling activities is divided into the folbwing periods; a) the frst stage (before 1945) as the starting period, b) the second stage (1945-1955) as the confirsing period after the Second World War, c) the third stage (after 1955) to the decline. 2. The peddling areas showed remarkable expansion in the second stage. This change was caused by the transpontation method of Peddlers. In the frst stage, Peddlers named Shl~a hawked on foot, but after 1945 they became to move by railroads. In the third stage, the peddling areas remained unchanged. 3. The backgrounds which produced peddlers in this district were the succession ofShl~a tradition and the scarcity of employment. The opportunities for peddlers to select the establishment of their trade and the peddling places were recognized as the following four patterns ; a) obtaining customers from their mothers, friends and acquaintances, b) being recommended to the peddling places by the people mentioned above, c) accepting the demands of consumers, d) seeking customers by their own efforts. 4. 28 peddlers in this district visit the following places; a) areas along the Mine Line, b) old town within Hagi-city, c) rural viuages back of Saumiura, d) Masuda and Gotsu cities, e) other regions. These peddling areas are limited by the elements of time and distance and the competition with peddlers from other districts.
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  • Yoshiki OKA
    Type: Article
    1986 Volume 41 Issue 3 Pages 150-164
    Published: 1986
    Released: April 20, 2017
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    Studies of the mountain development of Japan have been made on the following assumptions deduced from the Davician cycle theory. They are as follows ; ( I ) The alrnost areas in Japan Island were flattend or peneplained in late Tertiary or early Pleistocene age. (2) The outline of topography of Japan Island was graduaily formed by tectonic movements which followed such stable period. Undulating low relieves of ridge or accordant ridges have been thought to be remnants of erosion surfaces or peneplains. (3) On the other hand, the chronological studes on mountain have been made on the hypothesis of mutiple cycle theory. Terrace-like erosion surfaces recognized for the reason of accordance of ridge have been explained to be results of alternation of uplift and stable age. Mairfy, the procedure of such study is frstly to class~y erosion sufaces and next to determine the ages of them. The author attempts to reconsider if the basic assumptions of study as stated above is fruitful means of research. He examined the history of study on erosion surface in Japan and United States of America and he reconsidered, by exarning Tertiary sedirnents in the Japan island, in order to make clear whether there existed in tertiary age stable period in which lands have been once of low relief or flattened. As the results, the author suggests the following conclusions ; The assumptive ideas stated above are impracticai. Ridges of low relief and accordant ridges, regarded as remnants of erosion surface, are of differnt origin to be respectively examined. It is almost impossible to assumpt such stable age in Tertiary age or early Pleistocene age that the Japan Islands were of low relief or flattened. Tectonic movements have been so continuous through Cenozoic era that fault movements acted to compound topographies in different ages. In other words, new tectonic movements took place before pre-existing landforms were eroded down into low relif or flat. Therefore, we need to classify mountain masses and mountain ranges according to age of formation and to accord them to stresses in different tectonic fields in respective age. It is possible, by law of superposition, to classify mountains according to age of formation. The outline of the geomorphology of Japan are deterrnined by the transition or change of tectonism in late Cenozoic era. The author suggests that the important problem to be solved is to make clear order of mountain formation in relation to Cenozoic tectonic history.
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  • Haruhiro DOI
    Type: Article
    1986 Volume 41 Issue 3 Pages 165-177
    Published: 1986
    Released: April 20, 2017
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    Land use ofJapan is controlled by various zoning acts. For example, the city planning area is established by the 1968 City Plauning Act in order to restrict urban sprawl, and an agriculture promotion area by the 1969 Agriculture Prornotion Act in order to promote agriculture and to protect effectively agricultural land from urban developments. In decision making process of their zonings, prefectures play an important role, for they draw up plans for the land within their boundaries. Therefore, their zonings refiect circumstances and interests of each prefectures. The present paper intends to establish the regularity and difference in management of the city planning area and various area within it. The city planning area are generally established in the cities with populations of ten thousand or more. The area is divided into four types in respect of land-use control ; (1) urbanization promotion area (U. P. A.), in which conversions irom agricultural land to urban use are promoted, generally without permission, (2) urbanization control area (U. C. A. ), in which conversions of agricultural land to urban use are prohibited in general, (3) unzoned city plauning area with special use district, that has looser restriction than U. P. A. , (4) unzoned city planning area except special use district, that has looser restriction than U. C. A. , The flrst and second types of the areas are generally established within the cities with populations of one hundred thousand or more . The results of the investigations are as follows ; (1) The city planuing area is 25 percent of Japan, and increases gradually in area. The area is wider in the prefectures within the Pacific Coastal Belt than others. Thirty nine prefectures which have less than six hundred peoples per square kilometere, have high correlation with gross population, DID (Densely Inhabited District) population, DID area of them. Thus, C.P. A. increased as population increased in these prefectures. On the other hand, C. P. A. didn't increase in other prefectures (for example Tokyo, Kanagawa and Osaka), although populatlon of them increased. Some prefectures have high rate increase of the area from 1975 to 84, which is 6. I percent in national level. (2) U. P. A. area which is 14.5 percent of the city planning area, has extremely high correlation with DID area in all prefectures. Thus, in general, U. P. A. has 1.2 times of DID in area. (3) U. C.A. which is 40. I percent of the city planning area, has high correlation with gross population increase of population, DID population and DID area in 39 prefectures. Peripherai prefectures of the metropolitan region have wide U. C. A. On the other hand, Tokyo. Kanagawa and Osaka have extremely small U. C.A. area in proportion to gross population. The area has 2.7 times of U. P. A. in area. (4) Unzoned city planning area, both with special use district and except of it, which is 45.4 percent of the city planning area, has not high correlation with any variables. In the Pacific Coastal Belt, many cities under one hundred populations (the criteria of zoning) have U. P. A. and U. C. A. , due to the regional city plauning area with adjoirring cities. (5) From the relatlonship between U. P. A. , U. C. A. and unzoned city planning area, it is established four groups of prefectures. These groups correspond to the degree of urbanization of their prefectures in general. A. Tokyo, Kanagawa and Osaka, which are the center of two metropohtan regions. In the city plauning area of them. U. P. A. is 40 percent or more, and have few unzoned city planning area. B. The 5 prefectures in the metropolitan regions without group A, have few unzoned city planning area like group A, but U.P. A. is less than 40 percent. C. The 12 prefectures in the Pacific Coastal Belt, have unzoned city planning area more than 50 percent. D. Others, which includes 27 prefectures, have few U.P. A. and U. C.A..
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  • [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    1986 Volume 41 Issue 3 Pages 178-179
    Published: 1986
    Released: April 20, 2017
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  • [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    1986 Volume 41 Issue 3 Pages 179-180
    Published: 1986
    Released: April 20, 2017
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  • [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    1986 Volume 41 Issue 3 Pages 181-
    Published: 1986
    Released: April 20, 2017
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  • [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    1986 Volume 41 Issue 3 Pages 181-182
    Published: 1986
    Released: April 20, 2017
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  • [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    1986 Volume 41 Issue 3 Pages 182-
    Published: 1986
    Released: April 20, 2017
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  • [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    1986 Volume 41 Issue 3 Pages 182-183
    Published: 1986
    Released: April 20, 2017
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  • [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    1986 Volume 41 Issue 3 Pages 183-
    Published: 1986
    Released: April 20, 2017
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  • [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    1986 Volume 41 Issue 3 Pages 183-
    Published: 1986
    Released: April 20, 2017
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  • [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    1986 Volume 41 Issue 3 Pages 183-184
    Published: 1986
    Released: April 20, 2017
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  • [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    1986 Volume 41 Issue 3 Pages 184-
    Published: 1986
    Released: April 20, 2017
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  • [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    1986 Volume 41 Issue 3 Pages 184-
    Published: 1986
    Released: April 20, 2017
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  • [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    1986 Volume 41 Issue 3 Pages 184-
    Published: 1986
    Released: April 20, 2017
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  • [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    1986 Volume 41 Issue 3 Pages 184-185
    Published: 1986
    Released: April 20, 2017
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  • [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    1986 Volume 41 Issue 3 Pages 185-
    Published: 1986
    Released: April 20, 2017
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  • [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    1986 Volume 41 Issue 3 Pages 185-
    Published: 1986
    Released: April 20, 2017
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  • [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    1986 Volume 41 Issue 3 Pages 185-
    Published: 1986
    Released: April 20, 2017
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  • [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    1986 Volume 41 Issue 3 Pages 185-186
    Published: 1986
    Released: April 20, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    1986 Volume 41 Issue 3 Pages 186-
    Published: 1986
    Released: April 20, 2017
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  • Type: Index
    1986 Volume 41 Issue 3 Pages Toc1-
    Published: 1986
    Released: April 20, 2017
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  • Type: Index
    1986 Volume 41 Issue 3 Pages Toc2-
    Published: 1986
    Released: April 20, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    1986 Volume 41 Issue 3 Pages App2-
    Published: 1986
    Released: April 20, 2017
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  • Type: Cover
    1986 Volume 41 Issue 3 Pages Cover3-
    Published: 1986
    Released: April 20, 2017
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  • Type: Cover
    1986 Volume 41 Issue 3 Pages Cover4-
    Published: 1986
    Released: April 20, 2017
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