GEOGRAPHICAL SCIENCES
Online ISSN : 2432-096X
Print ISSN : 0286-4886
ISSN-L : 0286-4886
Volume 51 , Issue 1
Showing 1-15 articles out of 15 articles from the selected issue
  • Type: Cover
    1996 Volume 51 Issue 1 Pages Cover1-
    Published: 1996
    Released: April 20, 2017
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  • Type: Cover
    1996 Volume 51 Issue 1 Pages Cover2-
    Published: 1996
    Released: April 20, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    1996 Volume 51 Issue 1 Pages App1-
    Published: 1996
    Released: April 20, 2017
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  • Koichiro MINE
    Type: Article
    1996 Volume 51 Issue 1 Pages 1-18
    Published: 1996
    Released: April 20, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    In the previous paper(MINE, 1995), the author analyzed the structure of the hinterland of local small commercial port(Shimonoseki Port)at each establishment unit. While larger ports located in the central region of Japan may exercise wider influences over distant areas, and behind these ports extend more complicated commodity flows. In this study, "the sphere of influence" of major ports in Osaka Bay are elucidated with special attentions to the following points. Many researchers consider that it is getting more and more difficult to understand "the sphere of influence" of modern port, especially industrial one, because the commodity flows to/from it became complicated. The author present one approach to understand the complicated structure of "the sphere of influence" of modern large ports by using the framwork of relationships "foreland-port-hinterland" and by emphasizing the function of the industrial bases and commodity flows, and each establishment's activity. That is, the systems of commodity flows between each establishment and its foreland(oversea network)or hinterland(land network)are investigated. Then the purposes of this paper are, firstly to make clear the functional differences and cooporations between commercial port and industrial port, and secondary, to reexamine the concept of the sphere of influnce. A Series of analyses yield the following results. (1)The analysis of foreland : "20 major ports in Japan(tokutei juyo kowan)" are classified into 4 categories : "6 principal commercial ports", "4 principal industrial ports", "middle industrial ports in Western Japan" and "local small commercial ports". Most of the first two categories are located in 3 major Bay of Japan. They exercise strong influences because they have complete ship networks like ocean liners and container liners. And within each bay area can we find the functional cooporation between commercial ports and industrial ports. (2)The anlysis of hinterland at the national or regional scales : The hinterland of 6 ports in Osaka Bay are investigated at national scale. The large commercial ports such as Kobe Port and Osaka Port have wide influential area over the whole country. On the contrary industrial ports have narrower influenctial area restricted mainly to the Kinki region, but they have considerable share of the volume of freight there. In many cases Nara Prefecture is the second destination of oil and cement products through Sakai-Senboku Port. The author consider Nara Prefecture as a "secondary hinterland" of Sakai-Senboku Port which is peculiar to industrial ports. (3)The anlysis of hinterland at each establishment scale : 9 establishments located in Osaka Prefecture were classified into 3 types. Type 1 establishments make exclusive use of berths at Sakai-Senboku Port and have strong connections with other establishments of the same company located in far region. Type 2 establishments located at coastaldistrict of Sakai-Senboku or Osaka Ports have two dominant types of commodity flows : the overseas flows from other domestic ports and the overland flows to domestic destination. Type 3 establishments located far from ports, have two dominant types of flows : the overland flows from domestic origin and to domestic destination. Furthermore, the export and outward of commodities show more complicated patterns than the import and inward of materials . For the export, whether establishments make exclusive use of berths or not, they tend to use Osaka Port or Kobe Port that is rich in sea routes. But, in the case of domestic shipment, establishments that make exclusive use of berths of their own.
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  • Norihiko ISODA
    Type: Article
    1996 Volume 51 Issue 1 Pages 19-33
    Published: 1996
    Released: April 20, 2017
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    Some papers reported that the internal migration patterns in the 1980s showed a tendency to be reconcentrated into core regions in developed countries including Japan. In analyzing the internal migration patterns in developed countries, it is important to examine inter-urban migration patterns. The purpose of this paper is to clarify the inter-urban migration pattems in Japan between 1985 and 1990 by employing 1990 Population Census of Japan. This paper consists of three sections. The first section investigates the inter-urban migration patterns in the 1985-1990 period. The second section reveals the migration patterns between the three major metropolitan areas(the Tokyo, Osaka and Nagoya metropolitan areas)and cities in non-metropolitan areas(which are composed of thirty-five prefectures except for the three major metropolitan areas)in the same period. The last section is devoted to the examination of the internal migration patterns in each major metropolitan area. The main findings obtained are summarized as follows ; 1) The inter-urban migration patterns in Japan between 1985 and 1990 are characterized by the concentration of migrants into higher order cities(Ia - IIIa classes), especially into the three major cities(Tokyo, Osaka and Nagoya cities)and regional centers such as Sapporo, Sendai, Hiroshima and Fukuoka. 2) The migration areas to the three major metropolitan areas are spatially very different from each other. The Tokyo metropolitan area attracts its net in-migrants from the whole non-metropolitan areas, particularly Northeastern Japan(the Hokkaido and Tohoku district)and the Kyushu district. On the other hand, the migration areas to the Osaka and Nagoya metropolitan areas are spatially limited, the Osaka metropolitan area plays an important role as the center of internal migration only in Western Japan(the Kinki, Ctugoku and Shikoku district), while the Nagoya metropolitan area attracts net in-migrants not only from the Tokai district(Aichi, Gifu and Mie prefectures)but also from the Kyushu district. Nagoya metropolitan area is characterized by relatively close connection with cities(e.g.Kitakyushu, Nagasaki and Kagoshima)located in the Kyushu district. 3) The internal migration patterns in the Tokyo metropolitan area differ from those in the Osaka and Nagoya metropolitan areas. Because of rapid growth of the Tokyo metropolitan area it is characterized by high mobility of the population and active suburbanization from the central city(the ward area of Tokyo prefecture)in comparison with the others. In addition, it is clear that the suburb areas with high commuting rates to the central cities of the three major metropolitan areas tend to show higher gross and net migration rates to the central cities than the outer areas.
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  • Toshio MIZUUCHI, Kumiko WATA
    Type: Article
    1996 Volume 51 Issue 1 Pages 34-54
    Published: 1996
    Released: April 20, 2017
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    Development of residential suburb in the prewrar days of Japan before 1 945 is characterized with proposing new style of houses and daily lives and their residential landscape, in which residents mainly belonged to both the social and economic upper class society at that time. Therefore, those sites developed before The World War II are quite different in terms of physical landscape , and residential culture from those developed after 1960s when the class distinctiveness were becoming disappearing due to the economic boom. The studies of residential suburb in the prewar days are mainly progressing in the disciplines of architecture, town planning and history of business. They pursue the ideas and technical knowledge of the planners who were actually engaged in the construction of the suburban housing sites, clarifying the characteristics of the planning scheme, spatiai patterns of their location, and the physical features of the housing and site planning. Attention is also stressing on the explication of the business manner of land and housing development by railways' companies. Unfortunately, geographical inquiry into this theme is not sufficient. In this paper, the authors preliminary propose the alternative framework for proceeding the geographical study of residential suburb. In this description, we adopt renewed concept of'place' with which many geographers are recently discussing in the forefront of cultural and social geography in the Anglo world. Refering to the recent studies which are mainly focusing on the mediating role of place, this paper clarifies the process of acquiring the meaning of place which is nurtured by the specific residents of elite class living in the resiential suburban site. This meaning grows in the manifestation of the selected status of elite class, production of space which excludes the others and the differentiated mode of specific consumption of the residents. In the case study of Sayama suburban housing sites in the south-eastern region of Osaka prefecture, the authors explore how this housing site created the differentiated elite residential place by the establishment of many kinds of social and cultural associations and movements such as Sayama Culture League, and Sayama Culture Club which had both advocated the new styles of cultural and recreational activities toward the residents. The community association of this residential suburb had also dealt with many environmental problems in order to protect their residential atomosphere, by requirment of the provision of infrastructure and the efforts to introduce the building control agreement. The attachment and pride to the place among residents had led them to construct monument and to create new place name as a symbol of their elite consciousness.
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  • [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    1996 Volume 51 Issue 1 Pages 55-57
    Published: 1996
    Released: April 20, 2017
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  • [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    1996 Volume 51 Issue 1 Pages 57-59
    Published: 1996
    Released: April 20, 2017
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    Download PDF (509K)
  • [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    1996 Volume 51 Issue 1 Pages 59-62
    Published: 1996
    Released: April 20, 2017
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  • [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    1996 Volume 51 Issue 1 Pages 62-63
    Published: 1996
    Released: April 20, 2017
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  • [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    1996 Volume 51 Issue 1 Pages 64-
    Published: 1996
    Released: April 20, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (205K)
  • Type: Appendix
    1996 Volume 51 Issue 1 Pages 65-66
    Published: 1996
    Released: April 20, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    1996 Volume 51 Issue 1 Pages App2-
    Published: 1996
    Released: April 20, 2017
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    Download PDF (302K)
  • Type: Cover
    1996 Volume 51 Issue 1 Pages Cover3-
    Published: 1996
    Released: April 20, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (27K)
  • Type: Cover
    1996 Volume 51 Issue 1 Pages Cover4-
    Published: 1996
    Released: April 20, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (27K)
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