GEOGRAPHICAL SCIENCES
Online ISSN : 2432-096X
Print ISSN : 0286-4886
ISSN-L : 0286-4886
Volume 53 , Issue 1
Showing 1-15 articles out of 15 articles from the selected issue
  • Type: Cover
    1998 Volume 53 Issue 1 Pages Cover1-
    Published: January 28, 1998
    Released: April 20, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • Type: Cover
    1998 Volume 53 Issue 1 Pages Cover2-
    Published: January 28, 1998
    Released: April 20, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (27K)
  • Type: Appendix
    1998 Volume 53 Issue 1 Pages App1-
    Published: January 28, 1998
    Released: April 20, 2017
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  • Shigeru KIMURA
    Type: Article
    1998 Volume 53 Issue 1 Pages 1-26
    Published: January 28, 1998
    Released: April 20, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Nation-wide scale industrialization has been promoted since the 1960s in Thailand. However, the industrialization-oriented policy and the centralized development strategy created income inequality and regional disparity. In order to overcome this problem, the government launched regional development strategies, which resulted in the creation of new employment opportunities in regional centers. The adaptation of rural residents to the changing economic environments varied from region to region, mainly owing to the extent of the urbanization impact, capitalist penetration and the bind of local tradition. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the pattern of socio-economic stratification by analyzing the occupational and income structure in rural society of the Northern Thailand. Discussion is mainly based on the case study at Klang Dong village located about 34 km southwest of Chiang Mai city. The development of Chiang Mai and its satellite cities has increased the chances for the people to find jobs in this region. In fact, improvement of roads and availability of motorcycles allowed residents to commute longer distance. However, the occupation as well as income structure in the village is still much affected by the amount of landholding and the number of working people in each household. Upper class peasant farmers grow commercial crops which bring them certain cash, a part of which will be invested for self-employed businesses, such as operation of retail store, transport business, threshing machine, for additional income. Their children of these farmers are able to get better jobs such as civil servant and clerks because they tend to have opportunity for higher education which their parents can afford. On the contrary, the lower class household tends to depend on temporary daily jobs with smaller wages. The number of villagers seeking jobs in Bangkok metropolis has been decreasing while the number of commuters of Chiang Mai city has been increasing. However, the number of people who can get a full-time and high-income job is still small, and most of the villagers are engaged in farming. Many of the residents have no job in agricultural off-season to be surplus labour power. The housewives of farm household are engaged in sewing works which is under the control of city-based merchants. Hence, the people in the rural area are incorporated as peripheral labour force of urban labour markets. If the customary equal inheritance system promotes the subdivision of land into more tiny plots, more and more people will have to depend on unstable daily wage jobs in the near future. Income inequality has deteriorated further and disparity between upper class peasant farmer household or self-employed household and lower class household reaches several fold.
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  • Ryoji YASUKURA
    Type: Article
    1998 Volume 53 Issue 1 Pages 27-43
    Published: January 28, 1998
    Released: April 20, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Since the latter part of 1960s, new central shopping areas in front of the railway stations have been formed by a construction of urban redevelopment buildings and a high accumulation of urban core functions. These are typical examples of the opening of big stores in the suburban cities of the metropolitan areas. These phenomenon led to the expansion of central shopping areas and their functional importance, while declining retail activities in the old existing central shopping streets. This paper is to clarify the reorganization of retail activities and changes of the accumulation of urban core functions in Sakai City, located near the Sakai-Higashi station of the Nankai Koya Line, Osaka metropolitan area. This paper has been approached from the viewpoint of vertical growth in comparison with forms and func- tions between urban redevelopment buildings and the central shopping streets between 1979 and 1994. The results are summerized as follows: 1) After World War II, Sakai-Higashi has developed as the central shopping area of Sakai City because of the formation of central shopping streets which stands for Ginza-gai which originally used to be the free market. The central shopping area is divided into urban redevelopment buildings and the central shopping streets because of urban redevelopment that took place between the late 1960s and the first half of 1980S. 2) The difference of retail activities between the buildings constructed during the urban redevelopment period and the central shopping streets has been expanded between the latter part of 1980s and the beginning of 1990S. This is because the former was renovated and made into a larger and more pleasant appearance. The latter was characterized by large decline of sales and closure of the big super stores. Therefore, retail activities of the central shopping area become dominant in the urban redevelopment buildings. 3) The central shopping area had a vertical growth around the central shopping streets. On the other hand, the vertical growth of the central shopping streets, especially Ginza-gai, was delayed in comparison to other streets since each lot of these streets was very small. 4) The distribution of urban core functions in the first floor is based on the these functions observed in each street does not differ. This distribution pattern has not changed between 1979 and 1994. The development of urban functions related with vertical growth, however, tend to reflect the process of change of non-urban core functions into urban core functions rather than the change of urban functions to higher ones. 5) From the point of view of the vertical use of space, distribution of 'retail' shops in urban redevelopment buildings and the central shopping streets is clearly different depending on the type of urban core functiOnS. The agglomeration of 'drink and amusement' shops, however, was dominated from the basement to middle stories (3〜5 stories) level, mainly in the back street of Oshouji-dori. 'Business and public' services were concentrated along the main road and the north part of the Ginza-Kita-shotengai. As the number of stories in the building increases, the rate of the services mentioned above also become more concentrated.
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  • Satoshi YAMAGUCHI
    Type: Article
    1998 Volume 53 Issue 1 Pages 44-60
    Published: January 28, 1998
    Released: April 20, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    In local election, most candidates get votes from their home district. This is called "friends and neighbours effect" or "local effect" in electoral geography. But candidates of citizen groups, as one of the new political movements, perform election activities and get votes across large area, becase they are supported by the network of various people beyond existing community power structure. The candidates of organized party, the Japan Communist Party and the Komeito, build strong relationships to his/her neighbours, in the process of strategic assignment of party members' votes to them. This paper surveys the relationship between candidates of citizen groups/the Japan Communist Party and his/her home district in Amagasaki city council election, 1997. In this election, four candidates of citizen groups claimed whole municipal issue, council reforming, as in the last election (1993). They not only maintained and newly constructed broad network of citizens, but this tme they also did locally-oriented election activities. There were two reasons why they regarded each home district as importnat. i) Three of them who had won the last election build relationship to their neighbours during their term of office, and ii) many voters wanted their local representatives because of the influence of the Great Hanshin-Awaji Earthequake (1995) etc. However the candidates' attitude toward home district and their spatial spheres of election activities varied considerably. These factors affected each scope of votes and even the electoral results. This paper illustrates the assigned zones of the Japan Communist Party. These zones determined the spheres of votes of the candidates and enabled them to get solid votes. Additionally, in the official gazette for election, the candidates promised to consider local interests to the neighbours of their own zones.
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  • [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    1998 Volume 53 Issue 1 Pages 61-
    Published: January 28, 1998
    Released: April 20, 2017
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  • [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    1998 Volume 53 Issue 1 Pages 62-64
    Published: January 28, 1998
    Released: April 20, 2017
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    Download PDF (543K)
  • [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    1998 Volume 53 Issue 1 Pages 65-66
    Published: January 28, 1998
    Released: April 20, 2017
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    Download PDF (317K)
  • [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    1998 Volume 53 Issue 1 Pages 67-68
    Published: January 28, 1998
    Released: April 20, 2017
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    Download PDF (295K)
  • [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    1998 Volume 53 Issue 1 Pages 68-69
    Published: January 28, 1998
    Released: April 20, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (219K)
  • Type: Appendix
    1998 Volume 53 Issue 1 Pages 70-71
    Published: January 28, 1998
    Released: April 20, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    1998 Volume 53 Issue 1 Pages App2-
    Published: January 28, 1998
    Released: April 20, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (445K)
  • Type: Cover
    1998 Volume 53 Issue 1 Pages Cover3-
    Published: January 28, 1998
    Released: April 20, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (56K)
  • Type: Cover
    1998 Volume 53 Issue 1 Pages Cover4-
    Published: January 28, 1998
    Released: April 20, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (56K)
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