GEOGRAPHICAL SCIENCES
Online ISSN : 2432-096X
Print ISSN : 0286-4886
ISSN-L : 0286-4886
Volume 59 , Issue 1
Showing 1-21 articles out of 21 articles from the selected issue
  • Type: Cover
    2004 Volume 59 Issue 1 Pages Cover1-
    Published: January 28, 2004
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Type: Cover
    2004 Volume 59 Issue 1 Pages Cover2-
    Published: January 28, 2004
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2004 Volume 59 Issue 1 Pages App1-
    Published: January 28, 2004
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Shinichiro SUGIUTS
    Type: Article
    2004 Volume 59 Issue 1 Pages 1-25
    Published: January 28, 2004
    Released: April 15, 2017
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    This paper examines the gap between the reality and ideal conditions when entering a nursing home by analyzing a questionnaire's results and explores the criterion of location in selecting a home. Recently, the aging of Japan's population has become a serious problem. In particular, the necessity to provide long-term care for the elderly has rapidly grown more urgent. This social change prompted the introduction of the "Long-term Care Insurance System" in April 2000. This new system of delivering various services to the elderly has increased the demand for institutional care rather than domiciliary care because of the pricing structure. According to previous studies, nursing homes, which represent a typical service of institutional care, have serious regional disparities in location among the municipalities. Furthermore, these studies showed that demand tends to concentrate on entering a nursing home located near one's original home. This paper aims to grasp the demand of residents and their families for nursing homes directly through a questionnaire distributed in the Tono planned area for the promotion of services, Gifu Prefecture, Japan. The results of the questionnaire are summarized as follows : About one third of the residents of nursing homes had lived with their on's family, while one third of them had lived alone or with only their elderly spouse who had less power to take care of hemselves at home. Many residents had utilized services for the elderly before entering a nursing home. About 80% of them utilized institutional care (other than the nursing home) and about 70% of them utilized domiciliary care. The residents who had no experience of using either of them were very exceptional. Children (and their spouses) of the residents are the dominant persons in selecting the nursing home where residents currently live. The reasons why residents had entered nursing homes tended to be passive ; for example, they included "accepting a suggestion by the administrative officers to enter the nursing home" and "being able to enter a nursing home as soon as possible". These reasons are caused by the strong demand to quickly enter a nursing home and the mental pressure imposed by the care by family at home, which can be very troublesome. Although there is the passive tendency, proximity to the home where a resident had lived previously was the dominant reason among various reasons for selecting an institution. In contrast, the ideal method of selecting a nursing home reported by the respondents of this questionnaire, imagining that they themselves were going to enter an institution, was to consider the factors related to quality of life in a nursing home. These factors include, for example, pleasant personalities of the care staff and a private room that can maintain one's privacy. Clearly there is a gap between the actual factors that influenced the residents who had already entered a nursing home and the ideal factors considered by the respondents of this questionnaire imagining if they were to enter a nursing home in the future. This gap is caused by the shortage of information about each nursing home and the number of beds, which results in a long waiting list. Although there is a gap between the reality and ideal conditions in entering a nursing home, the desire for proximity to one's original home is a common important factor for both actual residents the respondents who are just imaging a future ideal. Accordingly, these results of the questionnaire suggest that it is necessary for administration (central and local govemment) to be assiduous in building nursing homes such a way as in order to avoid regional disparities, especially among municipalities.
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  • Yuichi KAGAWA
    Type: Article
    2004 Volume 59 Issue 1 Pages 26-46
    Published: January 28, 2004
    Released: April 15, 2017
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    In Japanese geographical studies, there were few perspectives to political process except for election studies. Especially studies of social movements have been disregarded from geographers. But political geographers in Anglophone countries tried to analyze for social movements as well as other political problems in 1990's. This study aimed at clarification to studies of social movements by geographers. Those discussions are mainly from sociological studies. In addition to this point, foreign geographical studies influenced to Japanese geographers on the debate of urban social movements and new social movements. At the first, sociological studies are objects in the discussion of social movement. In 1960's two-renewal concepts, which are the theory of new social movements and the resource mobilization theory were introduced. The reason why the new type of social movements arise is the old type of social movements, socialism or labor movement, had transited in renewal style because of the industrialization process and so on. Research points also changed. Thus a new wave of the theory of social movements that born in European and American countries introduced to Japanese sociology. Secondary, new urban sociology was begun by Castells (1977). He applied Marxist urban theory to urban question in Paris. This approach applied to other social movements and urban sociologists used its study method. The theory of urban social movements appeared on the discussion. Gradually sociological debates on social movement came to Japanese sociologist and foreign geographers. Thirdly the relation of social movements studies and geographers is examined. Radical geography is the first impression of social movements to them. Takeuchi (1980) mentioned that Bunge coped with community movement in his style and Harvey challenged Marxist approach to urban inequality. These studies are viewed the political attitudes of geographer at that time. As to Japanese geographer produced some social movement study, too. Next happening occurred in 1990's. Some Political geographers structured a geographical viewpoint to social movements. Smith (1994) dealt with social movements in the textbook of human geography. 0nly one paragraph was given on it. However Painter (1995) used one chapter for social movements study. He explained the theory of social movement and the appliance to experiential studies in geography. Agnew (1997) reviewed geographical studies on social movements. He gathered election studies with political movements and anti-military movement with social movements. Then case studies were showed by Routledge (1993) and Miller (2000). They take social movements with a geogaphical approach. It can be pointed out that those studies are influenced by the sociological theory of social movements. Geographical concepts were applied for actual social movements. That study has originality in geographical works. Lately Japanese geographers tried to study on the politics of place as same as social movements. They are environment, gender, modernization, urbanization, and pollution problems. Social movement studies are just getting to place on Japanese geographical society. It is expected that theoretical and practical study on social movements will develop.
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  • Takashi SHIMURA
    Type: Article
    2004 Volume 59 Issue 1 Pages 47-58
    Published: January 28, 2004
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    2004 Volume 59 Issue 1 Pages 59-60
    Published: January 28, 2004
    Released: April 15, 2017
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    Download PDF (330K)
  • [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    2004 Volume 59 Issue 1 Pages 60-62
    Published: January 28, 2004
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    2004 Volume 59 Issue 1 Pages 62-64
    Published: January 28, 2004
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2004 Volume 59 Issue 1 Pages 65-66
    Published: January 28, 2004
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2004 Volume 59 Issue 1 Pages App2-
    Published: January 28, 2004
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2004 Volume 59 Issue 1 Pages App3-
    Published: January 28, 2004
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2004 Volume 59 Issue 1 Pages App4-
    Published: January 28, 2004
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2004 Volume 59 Issue 1 Pages App5-
    Published: January 28, 2004
    Released: April 15, 2017
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    Download PDF (81K)
  • Type: Appendix
    2004 Volume 59 Issue 1 Pages App6-
    Published: January 28, 2004
    Released: April 15, 2017
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    Download PDF (81K)
  • Type: Appendix
    2004 Volume 59 Issue 1 Pages App7-
    Published: January 28, 2004
    Released: April 15, 2017
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    Download PDF (81K)
  • Type: Appendix
    2004 Volume 59 Issue 1 Pages App8-
    Published: January 28, 2004
    Released: April 15, 2017
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    Download PDF (81K)
  • Type: Appendix
    2004 Volume 59 Issue 1 Pages App9-
    Published: January 28, 2004
    Released: April 15, 2017
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    Download PDF (81K)
  • Type: Appendix
    2004 Volume 59 Issue 1 Pages App10-
    Published: January 28, 2004
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Type: Cover
    2004 Volume 59 Issue 1 Pages Cover3-
    Published: January 28, 2004
    Released: April 15, 2017
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    Download PDF (23K)
  • Type: Cover
    2004 Volume 59 Issue 1 Pages Cover4-
    Published: January 28, 2004
    Released: April 15, 2017
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