GEOGRAPHICAL SCIENCES
Online ISSN : 2432-096X
Print ISSN : 0286-4886
ISSN-L : 0286-4886
Volume 61 , Issue 2
Showing 1-16 articles out of 16 articles from the selected issue
  • Type: Cover
    2006 Volume 61 Issue 2 Pages Cover1-
    Published: April 28, 2006
    Released: April 15, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (538K)
  • Type: Appendix
    2006 Volume 61 Issue 2 Pages App1-
    Published: April 28, 2006
    Released: April 15, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (85K)
  • Type: Index
    2006 Volume 61 Issue 2 Pages Toc1-
    Published: April 28, 2006
    Released: April 15, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (25K)
  • Type: Index
    2006 Volume 61 Issue 2 Pages Toc2-
    Published: April 28, 2006
    Released: April 15, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (22K)
  • Yuya SATO
    Type: Article
    2006 Volume 61 Issue 2 Pages 63-80
    Published: April 28, 2006
    Released: April 15, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Innovation is considered to be a crucial factor for corporate activities. A growing interest in the geographical dimension of innovation has been apparent in economic geography theory. In discussions about agglomeration, geographical proximity between various actors is said to promote innovation because geographical proximity accelerates the transfer of knowledge, and that is important to innovation. But some articles in the literature point out that geographical proximity is not necessary to promote innovation. This paper assesses the research networks between companies and scientists in Tsukuba Science City (Tsukuba) and clarifies the examination of whether geographical proximity is important to promoting innovation. These analyses are based on an interview and on a questionnaire survey mailed to R&D laboratories and one mailed to members of the Pharmaceutical Society of Japan (Nihon Yakugakkai) in Tsukuba. The results can be summarized as follows. The reason that a private R&D center is located in Tsukuba is that they sought a relationship with a national R&D center. However, collaborative research was not promoted between the private and national R&D centers because the 'organizational proximity' was short. It is derived from the differences in the way the members of these R&D centers think. A private R&D center pursues the interests of economic performance whereas a national R&D center pursues the ideal of academic achievement. Members of a research support agency in Tsukuba fail to understand the R&D needs, so they do not play an important role in promoting research networks. When successful innovation is done, the intra-firm environment is more important than the interfirm environment because of the internal labor market and lifetime employment system that had developed in Japan. In particular, major firms have a high level of R&D expenditures, so they do not need a relationship with other firms to seek the seeds for innovation. Above all, research networks do not always grow in the local milieu. We therefore conclude that innovation does not necessarily need to be promoted based on geographical proximity.
    Download PDF (1837K)
  • Hiroyasu KAMO
    Type: Article
    2006 Volume 61 Issue 2 Pages 81-95
    Published: April 28, 2006
    Released: April 15, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The purpose of this study is to clarify the labor supplying behavior of contract businesses. The contract business saves as much money as possible by cutting unnecessary costs to make more profits and supplies the labor that corporate clients demand. Therefore, the laborers whom the contract business demands are laborers who can accept working condition or place of work change requests, and laborers who effectively assist in the labor cost savings of the contract business. In particular, these laborers are unmarried youths or foreigners in Japan, among others. The contract business recruits laborers in a suitable region for supplying this type of labor. The labor supply area of the contract business is principally defined as the travel-to-work area of each corporate client, because this area is the effective area for the contract business to save welfare and recruitment expenses. However, it is difficult for the contract business to supply the labor demand only in the travel-to-work area. Therefore, to supply suitable labor that matches the contract demand, the contract business supplies labor from other than the travel-to-work area. To do this, the contract business establishes an office to supply the labor or sends recruitment staff to areas other than the travel-to-work area of a client. The labor supply area this paper refers to is the peripheral areas in Japan, such as Okinawa, Hokkaido, and the Kyushu district, and the metropolitan areas, such as Tokyo, Osaka, and Nagoya. In the peripheral areas in Japan, the unemployment rate is relatively high. However, in these areas there are a large number of people who wish to be temporary workers. It is easy for the contract business to employ a young, unmarried person in these areas. In particular, the contract business that is located in Higashi-Hiroshima City supplies labor from the Chugoku, Shikoku, and Kyushu districts. In these districts there are relatively few workers that do not like having to work in Higashi-Hiroshima City and the contract business can save recruitment expenses in the supplying of labor in these districts, because these districts are comparatively close to this city.
    Download PDF (1686K)
  • Tsuyoshi YOSHIDA
    Type: Article
    2006 Volume 61 Issue 2 Pages 96-110
    Published: April 28, 2006
    Released: April 15, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    This paper revealed how high school students' impression of the world is formed based on attitude by the survey and textbook analysis data, focusing on the impact of indirect information. The U.S., major European countries, e.t.c. form high school students' impression of the world. The countries are classified by the students in consideration of whether they are developed or developing countries, and whether they are neighboring countries of Japan. Countries around the world are thereby given a certain rating, which an impression of the world is created by. Finally issues of geography education were discussed.
    Download PDF (1433K)
  • [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    2006 Volume 61 Issue 2 Pages 111-113
    Published: April 28, 2006
    Released: April 15, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (485K)
  • [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    2006 Volume 61 Issue 2 Pages 113-115
    Published: April 28, 2006
    Released: April 15, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (486K)
  • Type: Appendix
    2006 Volume 61 Issue 2 Pages 116-124
    Published: April 28, 2006
    Released: April 15, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (707K)
  • Type: Appendix
    2006 Volume 61 Issue 2 Pages 125-127
    Published: April 28, 2006
    Released: April 15, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (212K)
  • Type: Appendix
    2006 Volume 61 Issue 2 Pages App2-
    Published: April 28, 2006
    Released: April 15, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (74K)
  • Type: Appendix
    2006 Volume 61 Issue 2 Pages App3-
    Published: April 28, 2006
    Released: April 15, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (31K)
  • Type: Appendix
    2006 Volume 61 Issue 2 Pages App4-
    Published: April 28, 2006
    Released: April 15, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (31K)
  • Type: Appendix
    2006 Volume 61 Issue 2 Pages App5-
    Published: April 28, 2006
    Released: April 15, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (31K)
  • Type: Cover
    2006 Volume 61 Issue 2 Pages Cover2-
    Published: April 28, 2006
    Released: April 15, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (634K)
feedback
Top