GEOGRAPHICAL SCIENCES
Online ISSN : 2432-096X
Print ISSN : 0286-4886
ISSN-L : 0286-4886
Volume 66 , Issue 1
Showing 1-19 articles out of 19 articles from the selected issue
  • Type: Cover
    2011 Volume 66 Issue 1 Pages Cover1-
    Published: January 28, 2011
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2011 Volume 66 Issue 1 Pages App1-
    Published: January 28, 2011
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2011 Volume 66 Issue 1 Pages App2-
    Published: January 28, 2011
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2011 Volume 66 Issue 1 Pages App3-
    Published: January 28, 2011
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Type: Index
    2011 Volume 66 Issue 1 Pages Toc1-
    Published: January 28, 2011
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  • Type: Index
    2011 Volume 66 Issue 1 Pages Toc2-
    Published: January 28, 2011
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Hidenori OKAHASHI, Shogo BANSHOYA, Kensaku TANAKA, R. CHAND
    Type: Article
    2011 Volume 66 Issue 1 Pages 1-19
    Published: January 28, 2011
    Released: April 15, 2017
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    The rapid economic growth and globalization of India after the economic liberalization in 1991 have caused a reorganization of spatial structure on a nation-wide scale and a drastic change in the life of the people. In this paper, we intend to examine the socio-economic changes in rural areas of the underdeveloped regions of India focusing on employment oppportunities. We selected Uttarakhand State as a study area. The state has experienced development of underdevelopment and formed "Money Order Economy" depending on the money sent from migrant workers. However the state has shown a new development tendency such as tourist development and industrialization after the economic liberalization since 1991. We made an intensive household survey of a mountain settlement near Nainital that has grown rapidly as a hill resort. After completion of the investigation, we have discovered that various employment opportunities are provided in this village. This is due to the development of commercial agricultural production in the village and the availability of various off-farm employment chances offered in the labor market of Nainital. In terms of household economy, a number of households typically have an economic dependence on income from off-farm employment. In high-income households, individuals with large salaries, such as teachers and government officers, contribute to the household economic condition. On the other hand, there are an extremely high number of households engaged in agricultural work like growing vegetables. An agricultural income, though fundamentally small in terms of money, plays an important role in supplementing the total household income. In this village, household economies are significantly improved by both the expansion of off-farm employment and an increase in agricultural production. The expansion of employment opportunities and subsequent improvement of the household economy are mainly attributed to higher educational levels. Higher levels of education have been attained by both men and women by taking advantage of abundant educational opportunities offered in neighborhood areas. As a whole, highly educated people are successful in obtaining stable types of jobs, although some individuals have latent unemployment problems. This case highlights a notable example of a village in India's underdeveloped region that has grown out of a backward situation and has shown a development tendency. This example, however, may not be typical of all rural areas in Uttarakhand State. In our future work, we will examine the recent progress of regional diversification in Uttarakhand State.
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  • Shun'ya KAMURA
    Type: Article
    2011 Volume 66 Issue 1 Pages 20-37
    Published: January 28, 2011
    Released: April 15, 2017
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    Existing geographical literature has focused little attention on the relation between people's daily travel and the transportation environments of their local communities. Consequently, there has not been much discussion on how transportation environments might be better conceived and laid out based on observed travel patterns of people in their community. This paper starts to address this omission using the method of personal trip survey to highlight how peoples' daily travel is affected by the transportation environment. Based on the results of the survey, the paper examines how a better transportation system might be laid out in Showa district of Kure City in Hiroshima Prefecture. For this study, questionnaires were distributed in three housing estates in Showa district: Daisan-danchi, Matsugaoka, and Yumegaoka. These three estates are all quite different in terms of when they were built, access to public transportation, and other factors. A total of 300 questionnaires were distributed on October 4 and 5, 2009, and 112 were returned, for a response rate of 37.3%. A preliminary survey of the transportation facilities available in Showa district revealed significant differences in access and convenience depending on where one lives in the district. The mode of transportation used for commuting was found to vary depending on the location of the neighborhood within the district, surrounding traffic conditions, and the age of the commuters. In contrast, private cars were considered very advantageous for trips to the hospital or for shopping, and were widely used even for relatively short trips within the district. Examining daily travel patterns more closely, it was observed that women tend to make more multipurpose trips; that is, they try to visit more than one place or accomplish more than one task while they are out. This pattern was especially evident when they were out shopping in their own cars. The same pattern of multipurpose trips or multiple trips was not observed for travel based on public transportation, which of course is much more restrictive than having your own vehicle. The study identifies a number of problems with current transportation patterns: (a) there did not seem to be a direct correlation between convenience of the bus routes and the mode of transportation used by local residents, and (b) public transport seemed unable to flexibly accommodate increased ranges of travel or changes in demand for different destinations. This suggests that public transportation might be improved by flexibly accommodating major differences in travel patterns such as between commuting on the one hand and traveling to shopping or medical facilities on the other hand.
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  • Type: Appendix
    2011 Volume 66 Issue 1 Pages 38-
    Published: January 28, 2011
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2011 Volume 66 Issue 1 Pages 39-
    Published: January 28, 2011
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2011 Volume 66 Issue 1 Pages App4-
    Published: January 28, 2011
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2011 Volume 66 Issue 1 Pages App5-
    Published: January 28, 2011
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2011 Volume 66 Issue 1 Pages App6-
    Published: January 28, 2011
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2011 Volume 66 Issue 1 Pages App7-
    Published: January 28, 2011
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2011 Volume 66 Issue 1 Pages App8-
    Published: January 28, 2011
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2011 Volume 66 Issue 1 Pages App9-
    Published: January 28, 2011
    Released: April 15, 2017
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    Download PDF (90K)
  • Type: Appendix
    2011 Volume 66 Issue 1 Pages App10-
    Published: January 28, 2011
    Released: April 15, 2017
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    Download PDF (90K)
  • Type: Appendix
    2011 Volume 66 Issue 1 Pages App11-
    Published: January 28, 2011
    Released: April 15, 2017
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  • Type: Cover
    2011 Volume 66 Issue 1 Pages Cover2-
    Published: January 28, 2011
    Released: April 15, 2017
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