Circulation Reports
Online ISSN : 2434-0790
Volume 1 , Issue 1
Showing 1-11 articles out of 11 articles from the selected issue
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Reviews
  • Motoaki Sano
    Type: REVIEW
    2019 Volume 1 Issue 1 Pages 4-7
    Published: January 10, 2019
    Released: January 10, 2019
    [Advance publication] Released: December 11, 2018
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    According to cardiovascular outcome trials, some anti-diabetic drugs can improve cardiovascular outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes. Sodium glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors (empagliflozin, canagliflozin, and dapagliflozin) have a strong preventive effect on both hospitalization for heart failure and the decline in kidney function in patients with type 2 diabetes, while glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists, especially human glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (liraglutide, semaglutide, and albiglutide), suppress arteriosclerotic diseases (stroke and myocardial infarction). Using these medications in combination could possibly prevent both hospitalization for heart failure and arteriosclerotic events. Dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) inhibitors are preferentially used as add-on therapy for type 2 diabetes. Cardiovascular outcome trials conducted so far suggest that DPP-4 inhibitors (sitagliptin, alogliptin, and saxagliptin) do not promote arteriosclerotic disease, but there may be a difference between these drugs with regard to safety for heart failure. Previous cardiovascular outcome trials have mainly focused on type 2 diabetes patients with established cardiovascular disease. In contrast, the CARMELINA study investigated the cardiovascular safety of linagliptin, a DPP-4 inhibitor, in patients with type 2 diabetes and kidney dysfunction.

  • Takashi Oki, Hirokazu Miyoshi, Yoshifumi Oishi, Arata Iuchi, Kenya Kus ...
    Type: REVIEW
    2019 Volume 1 Issue 1 Pages 8-16
    Published: January 10, 2019
    Released: January 10, 2019
    [Advance publication] Released: December 14, 2018
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    At present, heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) is a commonly accepted condition in HF patients. In contrast to HF with reduced EF (HFrEF), HFpEF is strongly associated with aging, and vascular, metabolic, neurohormonal, and systemic inflammatory comorbidities. Two major hypotheses explain the pathophysiology of HFpEF (stages C,D in the American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association HF staging system): (1) impaired active relaxation and increased passive stiffness of the left ventricular (LV) myocardium during diastole (left atrial [LA]-LV coupling); and (2) LV and arterial stiffening during systole (LV-arterial coupling). Cardiac structural and functional abnormalities can be evaluated using non-invasive measures, such as 2-D, flow velocity Doppler, and tissue Doppler echocardiography, to estimate LV filling pressure and afterload mismatch. The clinical application of 2-D speckle-tracking echocardiography (2D-STE) is feasible for earlier diagnosis of functional abnormalities of the LA, LV, and elastic arteries in asymptomatic patients with cardiovascular risk factors (stages A,B). The goal of this review is to highlight the role of 2D-STE to detect impairment of LA-LV-arterial coupling beyond diastolic function earlier, because it may provide important information on the pathophysiology and prevention of HFpEF.

Rapid Communications
Original Articles
Exercise Physiology
  • Masaomi Gohbara, Kunihiro Nishimura, Michikazu Nakai, Yoko Sumita, Tsu ...
    Type: ORIGINAL ARTICLE
    Subject area: Exercise Physiology
    2019 Volume 1 Issue 1 Pages 20-28
    Published: January 10, 2019
    Released: January 10, 2019
    [Advance publication] Released: December 14, 2018
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    Background: The aim of this study was to clarify the clinical impact of activities of daily living (ADL) using the Japanese Registry of All Cardiac and Vascular Diseases-Diagnosis Procedure Combination (JROAD-DPC) database.

    Methods and Results: From April 2012 to March 2014, the JROAD-DPC database included 206,643 patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS; n=49,784), heart failure (HF; n=136,878), or aortic aneurysm/dissection (Aorta; n=19,981). We divided them into 3 categories with regard to age (low, 20–59 years; middle, 60–79 years; high, ≥80 years) and admission ADL (low, Barthel index [BI] 0–70; middle, BI 75–95; high, BI 100). ACS, HF, and Aorta patients with low ADL had higher in-hospital mortality rates (18.3%, 16.7%, and 33.4%) than those with middle or high ADL (P<0.001, χ2 test). On multivariable analysis, BI on admission was associated with in-hospital mortality of ACS (OR, 0.986 per 1 BI; P<0.001), HF (OR, 0.986 per 1 BI; P<0.001), and Aorta (OR, 0.986 per 1 BI; P<0.001), adjusted for gender, age, body mass index, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, and the Charlson comorbidity index. Moreover, patients with low age and low ADL had a higher in-hospital mortality rate than those with high age and high ADL in regard to HF (8.6% vs. 6.0%).

    Conclusions: According to JROAD-DPC data, assessment of admission ADL is important in patients with cardiovascular disease.

Heart Failure
  • Shigeru Miyagawa, Kyongsun Pak, Shungo Hikoso, Tomohito Ohtani, Eisuke ...
    Type: ORIGINAL ARTICLE
    Subject area: Heart Failure
    2019 Volume 1 Issue 1 Pages 29-34
    Published: January 10, 2019
    Released: January 10, 2019
    [Advance publication] Released: December 12, 2018
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    Background: Accurate prognosis for heart failure (HF) survival is important for quality of life, treatment decisions, and early evaluation of new therapies and devices. Here, we developed a multivariate risk model for predicting survival in Japanese patients with HF, using parameters that are readily observable in a clinical setting.

    Methods and Results: We analyzed data for 1,214 adults with HF (EF <35%). Of 424 available clinical baseline factors in the derivation dataset, 17 candidate predictors were identified on Cox proportional hazards regression. These predictors were assessed for clinical relevance and tested in candidate models using cross-validated 5-year C-statistics. This process yielded a set of 14 covariates with good accuracy for predicting actual 5-year survival: age; LVEF; albumin; BMI; Hb; sodium; history of renal dysfunction, diabetes, or chronic dialysis; times HF recurred or required readmission to the hospital; use of cardiac drip, thiazide diuretic, or per oral inotropic agent; and loop diuretic dosage. These 14 variables were used to establish the Japan Heart Failure Model (JHFM) for predicting survival in patients with HF. When applied to an independent validation dataset, the results from the JHFM were closer to actual survival than those of the Seattle Heart Failure Model.

    Conclusions: JHFM predictions for 5-year survival had good accuracy for Japanese patients with HF. The JHFM uses parameters that can be measured at any hospital.

  • Toshiki Tanaka, Shingo Minatoguchi, Yoshihisa Yamada, Hiromitsu Kanamo ...
    Type: ORIGINAL ARTICLE
    Subject area: Heart Failure
    2019 Volume 1 Issue 1 Pages 35-41
    Published: January 10, 2019
    Released: January 10, 2019
    [Advance publication] Released: December 12, 2018
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    Background: Given that residual congestion is a predictor of poor outcome in patients with heart failure (HF), a therapeutic strategy for decongestion is required.

    Methods and Results: Eighteen HF patients with fluid retention despite oral furosemide >20 mg/day, with chronic kidney disease (CKD; estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR], <59 mL/min/1.73 m2) were enrolled. Patients were randomized into 2 groups: a tolvaptan group (tolvaptan, 7.5 mg/day, n=10) and a furosemide group (additional furosemide 20 mg/day, n=8), and followed up for 7 days. The urine volume significantly increased on day 3 in the tolvaptan group but not in the furosemide group. The body weight significantly decreased in the tolvaptan compared with the furosemide group on days 3 and 5. Although there was no difference in serum creatinine or eGFR in the 7 days between the 2 groups, serum cystatin C significantly decreased on day 7 in the tolvaptan group compared with the furosemide group. The residual congestion was more improved in the tolvaptan group than in the furosemide group.

    Conclusions: Adding tolvaptan but not furosemide significantly increased urine volume, decreased body weight and improved residual congestion without affecting the renal function or electrolytes in patients with HF with CKD under furosemide treatment.

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