Chemistry Letters
Online ISSN : 1348-0715
Print ISSN : 0366-7022
ISSN-L : 0366-7022
Volume 43 , Issue 3
Showing 1-37 articles out of 37 articles from the selected issue
Highlight Review
  • Ana M. Castilla, William J. Ramsay, Jonathan R. Nitschke
    2014 Volume 43 Issue 3 Pages 256-263
    Published: March 05, 2014
    Released: March 05, 2014
    [Advance publication] Released: November 28, 2013
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The creation of isolated chirotopic environments that mimic enzyme binding pockets has been a long-term goal in supramolecular chemistry. Metal–organic cages with enclosed and defined inner spaces have proven useful for this purpose. Here, we provide a review of recent progress on understanding, and controlling the transmission of stereochemistry within [M4(L)6] and [M4(L)4] tetrahedral cages.
    The creation of isolated chirotopic environments that mimic enzyme binding pockets has been a long-term goal in supramolecular chemistry. Metal–organic cages with enclosed, defined inner spaces have proven useful for this purpose. Here, we provide a review of recent progress on creating, understanding, and controlling the transmission of stereochemistry within [M4(L)6] and [M4(L)4] tetrahedral capsules. Fullsize Image
     
  • Fanyang Mo, John R. Tabor, Guangbin Dong
    2014 Volume 43 Issue 3 Pages 264-271
    Published: March 05, 2014
    Released: March 05, 2014
    [Advance publication] Released: December 26, 2013
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    This highlight review describes the recent progress in alcohol or masked alcohol-directed C–H functionalization, which enables rapid access to a large array of complex structures. Given the ubiquity of the hydroxy group in organic chemistry, these types of transformations may have significant impacts on synthetic strategy design.
     
  • Takeshi Tsumuraya, Ikuo Fujii
    2014 Volume 43 Issue 3 Pages 272-280
    Published: March 05, 2014
    Released: March 05, 2014
    [Advance publication] Released: January 21, 2014
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    This review article describes our strategy for directed evolution of catalytic antibodies in phage-displayed antibody (Fab) libraries. To evolve catalytic antibodies toward higher catalytic activity, we have reconstructed an enzyme-evolutionary process in vitro. Thus, a phage-displayed combinatorial library from a hydrolytic antibody, 6D9, generated by the conventional in vivo method by immunization with transition-state analog (TSA) 5, was screened against a newly devised TSA 7 to optimize the differential affinity for the transition state relative to the ground state. This method provided evolved mutants which exhibited 20-fold higher activity than the parent antibody, 6D9. Structural analysis revealed an advantage of in vitro evolution over in vivo evolution: an induced catalytic residue in the evolved catalytic antibody arises from double mutations in one codon, which rarely occur in somatic hypermutation in the immune response.
    This review describes phage-display technology used to evolve a catalytic antibody in vitro based on the evolutionary dynamics of enzymes. Thus, phage-displayed libraries derived from an original catalytic antibody were selected against a newly devised TSA, which was programmed to optimize antibody recognition for catalysis so as to provide variants with improved reaction rates (kcat). Furthermore, structural and mechanical comparisons of the evolved catalytic antibodies with the original antibodies have shown the advantages of this library format over the conventional in vivo method. In vitro evolution has great potential for generating novel catalysts as well as for providing opportunities to examine the evolutionary dynamics of enzymes. Fullsize Image
     
Letter
Editor’s Choice
  • Yan Xin, Zhiguang Guo
    2014 Volume 43 Issue 3 Pages 305-306
    Published: March 05, 2014
    Released: March 05, 2014
    [Advance publication] Released: November 13, 2013
    JOURNALS OPEN ACCESS
    A robust superhydrophobic surface of hexagonal ZnO microrods with a sole microscale structure was achieved via a controlled shape-preserving hydrothermal reaction. The obtained surface showed superhydrophobic properties with good mechanical properties by means of a tribological tester, which may provide an insight into designing robust water-repellent surfaces on various substrates and offer opportunities for developing various promising applications for biomimetic superhydrophobic surfaces.
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