Chemistry Letters
Online ISSN : 1348-0715
Print ISSN : 0366-7022
ISSN-L : 0366-7022
Volume 43 , Issue 4
Showing 1-50 articles out of 61 articles from the selected issue
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  • Ayako Taketoshi, Masatake Haruta
    2014 Volume 43 Issue 4 Pages 380-387
    Published: April 05, 2014
    Released: April 05, 2014
    [Advance publication] Released: February 08, 2014
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Although gold in bulk is poorly active as a catalyst, it exhibits surprisingly high catalytic activity when deposited as nanoparticles (NPs) on base metal oxides. The catalytic performance of supported gold NPs can be created by choosing the kind of support materials, by controlling the size of gold, and by building up strong contact of gold with the supports. Since perimeter interfaces around gold NPs act, in principle, as the active sites for oxidation and hydrogenation, gold should be smaller than 10 nm in diameter. A new area of research is clusters, which are smaller than 2 nm in diameter and less than 200 atoms. Gold clusters possess electronic structures different from those of bulk gold and at the same time provide increased fractions of edges and corners which are highly unsaturatedly coordinated sites. Accordingly, gold clusters will be blessed by unique catalytic performance, and many examples have recently been emerging. This article summarizes such examples in terms of “size- and structure-specificity,” covering gas-phase free clusters, polymer- or organic-ligand-stabilized clusters in liquid phase, and clusters supported on base metal oxides, carbon materials, and organic polymers for gas-phase and liquid-phase reactions.
    Gold exhibits unique catalytic properties when dispersed or stabilized by base transition-metal oxides as nanoparticles (NPs, diameter below 10 nm) and clusters (below 2 nm). Gold clusters possess electronic structures different from those of bulk gold and at the same time provide increased fractions of edges and corners which are highly unsaturatedly coordinated sites. Accordingly, gold clusters will be blessed by unique catalytic performance, and many examples have recently been emerging. This article summarizes such examples from a personal viewpoint and in terms of “size- and structure-specificity”, covering gas-phase free clusters, polymer- or organic-ligand-stabilized clusters in liquid phase, and clusters supported on base metal oxides, carbon materials, and polymers for gas-phase and liquid-phase reactions. Fullsize Image
     
  • Hiroshi Nishihara
    2014 Volume 43 Issue 4 Pages 388-395
    Published: April 05, 2014
    Released: April 05, 2014
    [Advance publication] Released: January 25, 2014
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Coordination programming is a recently proposed method of creating superstructures that utilizes the advantages of coordination chemistry to control chemical bonds and the arrangements of metal atoms and ions. This review summarizes the recent advances of research on this concept, which are roughly divided into four categories: interfacial programming for molecular circuit systems, cluster programming for systems with electromagnetic functions, supramolecular programming for energy and chemical conversion, and bio-inspired programming for functionalized soft materials.
    Coordination programming is a recently proposed method of creating superstructures that utilizes the advantages of coordination chemistry to control chemical bonds and the arrangements of metal atoms and ions for construction of chemical devices. This review summarizes the recent advances of research on this concept, which are roughly divided into four categories: interfacial programming, cluster programming, supramolecular programming, and bio-inspired programming. Fullsize Image
     
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