Chemistry Letters
Online ISSN : 1348-0715
Print ISSN : 0366-7022
ISSN-L : 0366-7022
Volume 44 , Issue 1
Showing 1-30 articles out of 30 articles from the selected issue
Highlight Review
  • Isabelle L. Kirby, Mateusz B. Pitak, Simon J. Coles, Philip A. Gale
    2015 Volume 44 Issue 1 Pages 2-9
    Published: January 05, 2015
    Released: January 05, 2015
    [Advance publication] Released: October 25, 2014
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Recent elegant examples illustrate the power of charge density analysis, employed in a systematic way, to link electron density distribution to molecular structure. This leads to new insights into important chemical systems and the effects of systematic modifications to them. The advances made in extracting the electron density distribution from standard resolution X-ray diffraction data and the subsequent use of this information in systematic studies are also described.
    Systematic experimental charge density studies aiming to link changes in molecular structure to chemical function through the electron density distribution are presented. Advances in obtaining the electron density distribution from standard resolution X-ray diffraction data are summarized. Fullsize Image
     
  • Kelli A. Ogawa, Andrew J. Boydston
    2015 Volume 44 Issue 1 Pages 10-16
    Published: January 05, 2015
    Released: January 05, 2015
    [Advance publication] Released: November 12, 2014
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    This highlight review focuses on the integration of organocatalysis and electrosynthesis. Specifically, we detail recent advances involving the use of organocatalysts to alter substrate redox potentials through the in situ generation of electroactive intermediates. The ability to redirect organocatalyzed pathways toward oxidative fates using electrolysis techniques has enabled highly efficient transformations that would traditionally require stoichiometric sacrificial oxidants.
    In this Highlight Review, we describe recent advancements brought about through integrated organocatalysis and electrosynthesis. The merger of these disciplines has led to the development of efficient anodic oxidations of catalytically generated species without the need for high cell potentials or stoichiometric exogenous oxidants. Through in situ interactions between the organocatalyst and substrate, an electroactive intermediate is generated catalytically. This interaction directly augments the redox potential of the substrate and leads to highly chemoselective oxidations. Inspired by early demonstrations of this technique, new developments have emerged that enable a broadened scope of functional group interconversion. Fullsize Image
     
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