Chemistry Letters
Online ISSN : 1348-0715
Print ISSN : 0366-7022
ISSN-L : 0366-7022
Volume 46 , Issue 5
Showing 1-41 articles out of 41 articles from the selected issue
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  • Yusuke Takezawa, Jens Müller, Mitsuhiko Shionoya
    2017 Volume 46 Issue 5 Pages 622-633
    Published: May 05, 2017
    Released: May 05, 2017
    JOURNALS RESTRICTED ACCESS

    Metal-mediated artificial DNA base pairs, consisting of two ligand-type nucleosides and a bridging metal ion, are promising building units for constructing DNA-based supermolecules. Metallo-base pairing allows the thermal stabilization and site-specific functionalization of DNA duplexes. In this review, representative examples of the metallo-base pairs are classified according to the metal species, and their structures and properties are highlighted. Recent applications including polymerase synthesis are also overviewed to illustrate the future directions of this research field.

    Metal-mediated artificial DNA base pairs consist of ligand-type nucleosides and a bridging metal ion and allow for the thermal stabilization as well as the site-specific functionalization of DNA duplexes. In this review, representative examples of the metallo-base pairs are classified according to the metal species and their structures and properties are described. Recent applications including polymerase synthesis are also overviewed. Fullsize Image
     
  • Masato Ikeda, Marina Kabumoto
    2017 Volume 46 Issue 5 Pages 634-640
    Published: May 05, 2017
    Released: May 05, 2017
    JOURNALS RESTRICTED ACCESS

    Chemically caged nucleic acids, which comprise a nucleic acid moiety and a synthetic molecular moiety (or “responsive unit”) that may be removed by an appropriate chemical stimulus, are valuable for the development of nucleic acid-based therapeutic strategies like prodrugs and medicine delivery systems. Light is one such stimulus, and excellent examples of photocaged nucleic acids have been developed. However, external light sources must be used for this methodology, and this presents problems concerning light penetration and off-target cytotoxicity. In contrast, chemically caged nucleic acids, which respond to chemical stimuli and autonomously modulate their functions without the need for external stimuli, present an alternative strategy for bioapplications. Herein, recent examples of chemically caged nucleic acids are presented, and the current limitations and future challenges encountered in this field are discussed.

    Chemically caged nucleic acids, which comprise a nucleic acid moiety and a synthetic molecular moiety (or “responsive unit”) that may be removed by an appropriate chemical stimulus, are valuable for the development of nucleic acid-based therapeutic strategies such as prodrugs and medicine delivery systems. Light is one such stimulus, and excellent examples of photocaged nucleic acids have been developed. However, external light sources must be used for this methodology, and this presents problems concerning light penetration and off-target cytotoxicity. In contrast, chemically caged nucleic acids, which respond to chemical stimuli and autonomously modulate their functions without the need for external stimuli, present an alternative strategy for bioapplications. Herein, recent examples of chemically caged nucleic acids are presented, and the current limitations and future challenges encountered in this field are discussed. Fullsize Image
     
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