Journal of Animal Clinical Medicine
Online ISSN : 1881-1574
Print ISSN : 1344-6991
ISSN-L : 1344-6991
Volume 24 , Issue 4
Showing 1-11 articles out of 11 articles from the selected issue
Special Contribution
Orijinal Article
  • Emiko SHIBATA
    2015 Volume 24 Issue 4 Pages 158-164
    Published: December 25, 2015
    Released: December 25, 2016
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Life education using animals is a method that could solve social problems such as incessant bullying and student suicide in schools. We use school-owned animals such as rabbits, guinea pigs, and chickens as “living teaching material” to educate children.Our group of veterinarians conducted various programs to support schools—“animal contact classes,” seminars for teachers, after-school animal classes, education on keeping pets, and public seminars on school-owned animals—from 2010 to 2014. The Nagoya City Board of Education helped us conduct an evaluation through questionnaires.We know that school-owned animals are useful in providing life education even though the number of schools that keep animals is decreasing and schools are facing problems such as allergies from animals and maintaining animal care during school vacations. Teachers in Nagoya city are becoming aware of the issues regarding school-owned animals and know about the importance of these animals, while veterinarians strive to continue operating Animal Assisted Education.
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  • Yuichiro MIZUTANI, Kazuaki TAKASHIMA, Tsuyoshi YAMANE, Yoshihisa YAMAN ...
    2015 Volume 24 Issue 4 Pages 165-171
    Published: December 25, 2015
    Released: December 25, 2016
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    This study retrospectively investigated the seroprevalence of the feline leukemia virus (FeLV) antigen and the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) antibody, as well as the prevalence of stomatitis and lymphoma in cats admitted to Kurayoshi Animal Medical Center/Yamane Animal Hospital (Japan), based on medical records over the past 10 years. The 10-year average FeLV and FIV prevalence was 15.1% and 17.5%, respectively. Stomatitis was observed in 11.4% of the FIV/FeLV-negative group, 20.8% of the FeLV-positive group, 27.6% of the FIV-positive group, and 37.5% of the FIV/FeLV-positive group. Lymphoma was present in 0.6%, 16.4%, 2.6%, and 2.1% of the FIV/FeLV-negative, FeLV-positive, FIV-positive, and FIV/FeLV-positive cats, respectively. The mean age of the cats at the time of death in the FIV/FeLV-negative, FeLV-positive, FIV-positive, and FIV/FeLV-positive groups was 9.2, 4.2, 9.6, and 7.0 years, respectively.
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Cace Report
  • Yasuhiko OKAMURA, Shuzo IZUMIYA, Ayumi MIYAZAKI, Masaaki KATAYAMA, Yuj ...
    2015 Volume 24 Issue 4 Pages 172-175
    Published: December 25, 2015
    Released: December 25, 2016
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The greater omentum was used in the reconstruction of non-healing wounds in two cats. The wounds were debrided and treated using omental pedicle grafts and flank fold flaps. One cat died because of metastasis of the mammary gland tumor 210 days after the procedure. The other cat required additional surgery because the iatrogenic ventral hernia worsened. Finally, complete healing occurred in all cats. The omentum should be considered a useful adjunct in the treatment of nonhealing wounds in cats.
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  • Aki OHMI, Yumiko TAIRA, Akihito KIWAKI, Saeko TANAHASHI, Shizuka KANAZ ...
    2015 Volume 24 Issue 4 Pages 176-179
    Published: December 25, 2015
    Released: December 25, 2016
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    A 9-year and 10-month-old spayed female Beagle dog presented with anorexia, vomiting, and ascites following intestinal resection and anastomosis that had been performed to treat a small intestinal adenocarcinoma. Cytological examination of the abdominal fluid revealed bacteria and yeast-like fungal organisms with pseudohyphae. Fungal and bacterial peritonitis due to dehiscence of the anastomotic site was diagnosed. Candida albicans was identified on fungal culture. The dog underwent a second laparotomy to repair the dehiscence, and peritoneal lavage was performed. Antifungal therapy with fluconazole was administered after surgery. The dog responded well to therapy, showing full recovery with no recurrence. Intestinal surgery, antimicrobial administration, and placement of an intraperitoneal drainage tube were considered to be associated with the pathogenesis of fungal peritonitis in this case. Candida peritonitis should be considered when empirical therapy for bacterial peritonitis is ineffective, especially in cases with predisposing risk factors. A high mortality rate is associated with Candida peritonitis in humans. Although this condition is uncommon in veterinary medicine, further information about Candida peritonitis in dogs is needed.
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  • Hideo SAKAI, Yoshitaka SAWAMOTO, Kiyoka SAKAI, Hitoshi ANO
    2015 Volume 24 Issue 4 Pages 180-184
    Published: December 25, 2015
    Released: December 25, 2016
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Two intact male dogs were admitted for gingival bleeding or dyschezia. Both dogs were cryptorchid and displayed feminizing syndrome, with increased levels of circulating estrogen. Histopathologic examination confirmed Sertoli cell tumor. Dog1 showed pancytopenia and severe hypoplasia of the bone marrow. After castration, despite treatment with lithium carbonate, darbepoetin, recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF), and anabolic steroids, the response was poor. Subsequently, we added a thrombopoietin receptor agonist (romiplostim) to the existing treatment regimen; gradually, the pancytopenia improved and myelopoiesis was restored. Dog2 was thrombocytopenic and anemic. While bone marrow evaluation revealed normo-hyperplasia, the megakaryocytic component showed severe hypoplasia. The dog had leukocytopenia after castration and was treated with romiplostim and rhG-CSF. Soon, pancytopenia improved and bone marrow megakaryocytic poiesis was restored. It is likely that romiplostim is a useful treatment for myelopoiesis inhibition induced by canine Sertoli cell tumor.
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Short Report
  • Shizuo YAMAGATA
    2015 Volume 24 Issue 4 Pages 185-187
    Published: December 25, 2015
    Released: December 25, 2016
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    A 11-year-old male Chihuahua was presented for treatment of an increasingly painful eye. Examination revealed marked blepharospasm and a fluorescein-positive keratitis of right eye. There was corneal opacity with raised yellowish lesion. Fungal keratitis was demonstrated by corneal scrape showing fungal hyphae. Treatment with systemic administration of itraconazole was successful in resolving the keratomycosis.
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  • Maho KOBAYASHI, Shiori KOIZUMI, Toshinori SAKO, Takako MATSUBARA
    2015 Volume 24 Issue 4 Pages 188-192
    Published: December 25, 2015
    Released: December 25, 2016
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    In this study, we aimed to create an evaluation table for prediction of pressure ulcer occurrence in dogs for use in veterinary nursing. We used decubitus occurrence prediction evaluation Table 4 types in humans to Shiba dogs two cases that are occurring pressure ulcers in bedridden. Based on our results, considering the differences between the criteria for humans and dogs, it is possible to adapt this evaluation table for use in dogs to predict pressure ulcer occurrence.KEY WORDS : pressure ulcer occurrence prediction evaluation table, shiba dogs, veterinary nursing
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