Journal of Animal Clinical Medicine
Online ISSN : 1881-1574
Print ISSN : 1344-6991
ISSN-L : 1344-6991
Volume 28 , Issue 1
Showing 1-9 articles out of 9 articles from the selected issue
Special Contribution
Cace Report
  • Youki TAKAKI, Fumi MURAKOSHI, Takehiro WATANABE, Takaaki NAKAYA, Yoshi ...
    2019 Volume 28 Issue 1 Pages 13-15
    Published: March 25, 2019
    Released: March 25, 2020
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    Hedgehogs are a reservoir of two species of zoonotic Cryptosporidium : C. parvum and C. erinacei (previously known as the hedgehog genotype). In Japan, only one case of the Cryptosporidium horse genotype has been reported. In this report, the hedgehog genotype was detected in three individual, captive hedgehogs in Japan. When compared to PCR in the commercial laboratory and the sucrose floating method, Kinyoun staining at the hospital was considered equally accurate for the detection of Cryptosporidium oocysts of the horse genotype. The oral administration of paromomycin might be effective against cryptosporidiosis in hedgehogs.

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  • Kenta MATSUMURA, Ami HOSOKAWA, Daisuke ITOU, Jyunko CHINO, Yuji SUGITA
    2019 Volume 28 Issue 1 Pages 16-20
    Published: March 25, 2019
    Released: March 25, 2020
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    Ureteral stenting and subcutaneous ureteral bypass (SUB) device placement are considered effective therapeutic strategies for feline ureteral obstruction as traditional surgical approaches are associated with high morbidity and mortality. Although many reports have demonstrated short- or medium-term success with ureteral stent and SUB placement, there are only a few reports on the minor complications associated with the procedures. Thus far, we have experienced complications — mainly infection-related — after ureteral stent or SUB placement in three cats. Urinary tract infection, without significant symptoms after SUB and stent placement, was observed in two cats. In one cat, chronic infectious ureteritis on the side of stent placement did not resolve, although several clinical signs disappeared after SUB placement. Based on urine culture results, targeted antibiotic treatment was initiated in all three cats. The antibiotics were effective in treating the urinary tract infections in all but one cat, which experienced recurrent urinary tract infection caused by the same bacterial species. Stent or SUB placement are effective surgical strategies for the treatment of feline ureteral obstruction, but emphasis should be placed on the long-term complications of these procedures.

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  • Yutarou IMAI, Marika UEDA, Kengo UEDA, Taihei KAWAGUCHI, Sou TATEIWA, ...
    2019 Volume 28 Issue 1 Pages 21-24
    Published: March 25, 2019
    Released: March 25, 2020
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    A 4-year-old female New Zealand dwarf rabbit suffering from anorexia was admitted to the hospital with an abdominal mass. In the central portion of the abdomen, a gastrointestinal mass was palpable. Abdominal ultrasonography, along with contrast-enhanced and angiographic micro-CT, was consistent with abscessation. An exploratory laparotomy was performed and several gastrointestinal abscesses that were adhered to the small intestine were observed. A partial intestinal resection and an enteroenterostomy completely removed the abscesses and adhesions. No recurrence of infection was observed in the rabbit 493 days postoperatively.

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  • Yukihito SHIROSHITA, Ryota IINO
    2019 Volume 28 Issue 1 Pages 25-29
    Published: March 25, 2019
    Released: March 25, 2020
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    Tracheal stenosis in cats generally has a poor prognosis. A 11-years-old female domestic short hair cat was admitted for tracheal stenosis with persistent stridor. Laryngotracheoscopy revealed mucosal thickening in the cervical trachea. Biopsy and brushing were underwent, following a silicone T-tube insertion into the stenotic trachea through a tracheotomy. Immediately, stridor was improved. Microscopic examination of the biopsy specimen disclosed chronic inflammation. The cat had been asymptomatic with medical therapy for 120 days until the T-tube extubation, and survived 480 days without relapse after the extubation.

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