Nippon Ronen Igakkai Zasshi. Japanese Journal of Geriatrics
Print ISSN : 0300-9173
Volume 36 , Issue 4
Showing 1-14 articles out of 14 articles from the selected issue
  • Nobuyoshi Hirose, Makoto Suzuki
    1999 Volume 36 Issue 4 Pages 219-228
    Published: April 25, 1999
    Released: November 24, 2009
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  • Toshiaki Nakajima, Mitsuru Emi
    1999 Volume 36 Issue 4 Pages 229-233
    Published: April 25, 1999
    Released: November 24, 2009
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  • Toru Kita, Yasuyoshi Ouchi
    1999 Volume 36 Issue 4 Pages 234
    Published: April 25, 1999
    Released: November 24, 2009
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  • Tetsuro Miki, Ye Lin, Jun Nakura, Atsuyuki Morishima, Katsuhiko Kohara
    1999 Volume 36 Issue 4 Pages 235-237
    Published: April 25, 1999
    Released: November 24, 2009
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  • Masayuki Yokode
    1999 Volume 36 Issue 4 Pages 238-241
    Published: April 25, 1999
    Released: November 24, 2009
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    Atherosclerosis results from complex inflammatory-fibroproliferative responses. Among the factors that could affect atherogenesis, the genes involved in regulation of the plasma lipoprotein levels are believed to play central roles. This paper focuses on the genes regulating the metabolism of the three major atherogenic lipoproteins, i. e. LDL, remnants, and Lp (a), and discusses the clinical significance of studying their polymorphism.
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  • Jitsuo Higaki, Tomohiro Katsuya, Toshio Ogihara
    1999 Volume 36 Issue 4 Pages 242-244
    Published: April 25, 1999
    Released: November 24, 2009
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  • Mariko Miyao, Takayuki Hosoi, Yasuyosi Ouchi
    1999 Volume 36 Issue 4 Pages 245-250
    Published: April 25, 1999
    Released: November 24, 2009
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  • Hiroyuki Arai
    1999 Volume 36 Issue 4 Pages 251-255
    Published: April 25, 1999
    Released: November 24, 2009
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    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VD) are two major dementing disorders in Japan. It has been well established that apolipoprotein E4 (ApoE4) increases the incidence of AD and lower the onset of AD in a dose-dependent manner. ApoE genotyping should not be used alone in the diagnosis of AD due to its limited sensitivity to detect AD. In VD, at the present time, no genetic risk factors that are directly linked to VD have been established. However, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene polymorphism may be a candidate conferring a risk to develop vascular diseases.
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  • Toru Egashira, Hiroshi Goto, Hiroshi Takeda, Kaori Takada, Teruhiko Ma ...
    1999 Volume 36 Issue 4 Pages 256-261
    Published: April 25, 1999
    Released: November 24, 2009
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    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE), choline, monoamine and its metabolite, amino acid and superoxide dismutase (SOD) levels were measured in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in patients with cerebrovascular diseases. Patients were classified into the following four groups; controls: normal subjects without neurological disease, group A: cerebral hemorrhage, group B: cerebral infarction, group C: patients with mental impairment, including those in groups A and B, and a low score on Hasegawa's Dementia Rating Scale. CSF AChE level of groups A, B and C was decreased significantly, while choline concentration from patients showed a increase compared with that of control cases. CSF alanine concentration showed a tendency to increase, while glycine and glutamate tended to decrease. CSF epinephrine, norepinephrine or 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylethylen glycol concentrations of groups A, B and C did not exhibit a significant difference from that in control cases. Some cases with cerebrovascular diseases showed low concentrations of both CSF 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid and homovanillic acid. However, dihydroxyphenyl acetic acid concentration was higher than in control cases. The CSF SOD level was not significantly from that in control cases. The changes in neurochemical substances in the CSF support their use as markers of cerebrovascular disease-related change.
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  • Hisashi Tsutsumi, Michiaki Mikoshiba, Rika Iwakiri, Toshiro Kumakawa, ...
    1999 Volume 36 Issue 4 Pages 262-267
    Published: April 25, 1999
    Released: November 24, 2009
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    Of 43 elderly patients who were suspected to have polycythemia between October 1990 and July 1998, 12 patients showed an increased red cell volume measured by 51Cr-labeled red blood cells. We analyzed the clinical charactaristics of the 12 patients consisted of 7 men and 5 women, with a median age of 71 (range: 57-92). Chief complaints were headaches and dizziness (3 cases), symptoms of other conditions than polycythemia (4 cases). Five patients had no symptoms. Five of 6 patients over 70 years old had no symptoms due to polycythemia. Seven cases (58%) showed splenomegaly and three cases (25%) showed hepatomegaly. Laboratory findings were as follows: WBC 9.7±3.9×103l (mean±SD, p<0.02 vs normal control), Hb 17.9±4.2g/dl (p<0.001), Plt 39.7±26.0×104l, EPO 13.8±5.2mU/ml (p<0.0001), NAP score 258±114, Vit. B12 1, 686±2, 156pg/ml, arterial O2 saturation more than 92% in all cases. The diagnosis of all cases was polycythemia vera according to the diagnostic criteria of Polycythemia Vera Study Group. Associated conditions included 8 cases of thrombosis (cerebral thrombosis 4, thrombophrebitis 2, myocardial infarction 1, ischemic colitis 1) and 3 cases of malignancy (esophageal cancer 1, breast cancer 1, renal cancer 1), none of which was therapy-related cancer. Six patients (50%) had only phlebotomy, three (25%) only chemotherapy, and three (25%) both phlebotomy and chemotherapy. Patients over 80 years old needed neither intensive nor continuous treatment. Only one patient died due to esophageal cancer at age 89.
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  • Seiji Yasumura, Takao Suzuki, Hideyo Yoshida, Tatsuro Ishizaki, Harumi ...
    1999 Volume 36 Issue 4 Pages 268-273
    Published: April 25, 1999
    Released: November 24, 2009
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    An external protector (EHP) which was developed in Europe to protect the femoral neck from direct impact on falling is available but has not been examined sufficiently in Japan.
    In order to explore the compliance of use of the EHP among the institutionalized elderly with in case of hip fracture who are at high risk of falling, we conducted the four-week intervention study using two types of a EHP. The subjects of a study consisted of 10 elderly people (2 men, 8 women) with a mean age 85.7 living in nursing home in a village. Informed consent was obtained from all participants. At the end of the study, rate of subjects who wore EHP was relatively high for the Finnish EHP (Safety Pants) group compared to the Danish EHP (Hip Protector) group. There were no significant differences between variables in age, sex, fall experience during the previous year, history of diseases etc. The reasons for dropout were first: difficult in wearing EHP and accompanying delay in toilet, secondly: taking much time to wear, thirdly: a sense of incongruity, too small or too tight'.
    If the EHP is redesigned to suit Japanese elderly, the compliance might increase. Thorough explanation to institutionalized elderly who may have cognitive impairment, physical problems, or both, is required.
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  • Yasuko Funabiki, Kenji Ishii, Shigeru Kusaka, Yasuhiro Hakamata, Yoshi ...
    1999 Volume 36 Issue 4 Pages 274-278
    Published: April 25, 1999
    Released: November 24, 2009
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    An 83-year-old man had an influenza-like upper respiratory infection that progressed to pneumonia and respiratory insufficiency during a period two weeks. After admission, anti-influenza A antibody increased 32-fold and antibiotic treatment had little effect on the pneumonia. Aspergillus antigen was detected from his serum and pleural effusion, however, culture of sputum was negative for aspergillus. Administration of amphotericin B reduced the serum level of aspergillus antigen, however he died due to the progression of respiratory insufficiency and bloody sputum. Aspergillus infection is generally thought to occur in immunocompromised hosts, but this patient had no apparent immunosuppressive conditions except for his age before the influenza A infection. His WBC and lymphocyte count temporally decreased to 2, 000×106/L (lymphocytes 160×106/L) followed by aspergillus infection. This temporally reduction of lymphocytes is thought to have been responsible for the aspergillus infection. Complications of influenza infection are sometimes fatal and vaccination against influenza seems necessary in high risk individuals such as elderly people.
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  • Hiroyuki Katsuoka, Yasuyo Mimori, Akira Harada, Takeshi Kitamura, Kats ...
    1999 Volume 36 Issue 4 Pages 279-283
    Published: April 25, 1999
    Released: November 24, 2009
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    A 75-year-old man had noticed muscle atrophy and weakness of his right hand and forearm at the age of 25. The symptoms slowly progressed and then stopped. Right hand tremor appeared at about age 40. There was no symptom in his left upper extremity, and his gait was normal. He now shows severe muscle atrophy in his right hand and forearm. There was distally dominant weakness of the right upper extremity and his hand grip was 0kg on the right and 25kg on the left. On admission there was no weakness in the bilateral lower extremities. He had postural tremor in both hands and fingers. The tendon reflexes were hypoactive in the upper extremities and normal in the lower extremities. Abnormalities in the superficial sensation were unremarkable, whereas vibration sensation in both the upper and lower extremities was mildly disturbed. Electromyography revealed chronic denervation, especially in the right upper extremity. The sensory nerve conduction study results and somatosensory evoked potentials in the upper extremities were normal. Cervical MRI demonstrated spondylotic changes, canal stenosis from the C5 to C7 levels, and compression of the spinal cord. His hand tremor was dominant on the right with a peak frequency of about 7Hz. Tremor frequency and power were decreased by mechanical load. Hirayama's disease (juvenile muscular atrophy of unilateral upper extremity) was the most probable diagnosis, although aging might have produced various additional abnormalities. The tremor seen in this patient showed characteristics of enhanced physiological tremor.
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  • 1999 Volume 36 Issue 4 Pages 284-292
    Published: April 25, 1999
    Released: November 24, 2009
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    Download PDF (1673K)
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