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SPECIAL ISSUE: NEW DEVELOPMENT OF RESEARCH ON PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT (PPE) FOR OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH
Review Articles
  • Faming WANG
    Type: Review Article
    Volume 55 (2017) Issue 6 Pages 473-484
    Released: December 07, 2017
    [Advance publication] Released: June 01, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    Evaporative resistance has been widely used to describe the evaporative heat transfer property of clothing. It is also a critical variable in heat stress models for predicting human physiological responses in various environmental conditions. At present, sweating thermal manikins provide a fast and cost-effective way to determine clothing evaporative resistance. Unfortunately, the measurement repeatability and reproducibility of evaporative resistance are rather low due to the complicated moisture transfer processes through clothing. This review article presents a systematical overview on major influential factors affecting the measurement precision of clothing evaporative resistance measurements. It also illustrates the state-of-the-art knowledge on the development of test protocol to measure clothing evaporative resistance by means of a sweating manikin. Some feasible and robust test procedures for measurement of clothing evaporative resistance using a sweating manikin are described. Recommendations on how to improve the measurement accuracy of clothing evaporative resistance are addressed and expected future trends on development of advanced sweating thermal manikins are finally presented.

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  • Eric VAN WELY
    Type: Review Article
    Volume 55 (2017) Issue 6 Pages 485-499
    Released: December 07, 2017
    [Advance publication] Released: October 17, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    The first standards for chemical protective clothing (CPC) emerged mid to late 1980's and have evolved since as most standards are revisited every 5 yr. Over the past years, we have also seen a strengthening of the chemical and worker protection legislation around the globe (various forms of REACH) but also protection of workers. The most prevalent standards originate under the auspices of the International Standards Organisation (ISO), European Committee for Standardisation (CEN) or under various US standards organisations (e.g. NFPA, ASTM). Protective clothing against hazardous materials is required in many of the professional and non-professional activities of everyday life. Effective and adequate protection is important in many scenarios from household (e.g. cleaning agents, peroxides, acids and bases, paints), to agricultural (e.g. fuel, pesticides), to medical (e.g. pharmaceuticals and active ingredients), to industrial production (e.g. petro-chemicals, chemicals, paints, adhesive and coatings) but also manufacturing of many products (e.g. light bulbs, cars, semi-conductors), during various emergency activities (e.g. boat, rail or road accidents as well as fire-fighting in an urban and industrial setting), and finally, military operations or response to incidents of terrorism. Nevertheless, CPC must remain the last line of defence whenever possible through a preference for less hazardous chemicals, less dangerous processes and handling operations, and by engineering controls to reduce and minimise human contact with the chemicals. This article provides information about the selection, use, care and maintenance (SUCAM) of protective clothing against chemical and microbiological hazards.

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Original Articles
  • Agnes PSIKUTA, Barbara KOELBLEN, Emel MERT, Piero FONTANA, Simon ANNAH ...
    Type: Original Article
    Volume 55 (2017) Issue 6 Pages 500-512
    Released: December 07, 2017
    [Advance publication] Released: September 29, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    Following the growing interest in the further development of manikins to simulate human thermal behaviour more adequately, thermo-physiological human simulators have been developed by coupling a thermal sweating manikin with a thermo-physiology model. Despite their availability and obvious advantages, the number of studies involving these devices is only marginal, which plausibly results from the high complexity of the development and evaluation process and need of multi-disciplinary expertise. The aim of this paper is to present an integrated approach to develop, validate and operate such devices including technical challenges and limitations of thermo-physiological human simulators, their application and measurement protocol, strategy for setting test scenarios, and the comparison to standard methods and human studies including details which have not been published so far. A physical manikin controlled by a human thermoregulation model overcame the limitations of mathematical clothing models and provided a complementary method to investigate thermal interactions between the human body, protective clothing, and its environment. The opportunities of these devices include not only realistic assessment of protective clothing assemblies and equipment but also potential application in many research fields ranging from biometeorology, automotive industry, environmental engineering, and urban climate to clinical and safety applications.

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  • Limin BAO, Yanling WANG, Takeichiro BABA, Yasuhiro FUKUDA, Kaoru WAKAT ...
    Type: Original Article
    Volume 55 (2017) Issue 6 Pages 513-520
    Released: December 07, 2017
    [Advance publication] Released: October 05, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    The purpose of this research was to enhance the stab resistance of protective clothing material by developing a new high-density nonwoven structure. Ice picks often injure Japanese police officers due to the strict regulation of swords in the country. Consequently, this study was designed to improve stab resistance against ice picks. Most existing anti-stab protective clothing research has focused on various fabrics impregnated with resin, an approach that brings with it problems of high cost and complicated processing. Seldom has research addressed the potential for improving stab resistance by using nonwoven structures, which exhibit better stab resistance than fabric. In this research, we prepared a series of nonwoven structures with densities ranging from about 0.14 g/cm3 to 0.46 g/cm3 by varying the number of stacked layers of Kevlar/polyester nonwoven under a hot press. We then proposed two methods for producing such hot-press nonwovens: the multilayer hot-press method and the monolayer hot-press method. Stab resistance was evaluated according to NIJ Standard-0115.00. We also investigated the relationship among nonwoven density, stab resistance, and flexural rigidity, and here we discuss the respective properties of the two proposed methods. Our results show that stab resistance and flexural rigidity increase with nonwoven density, but flexural rigidity of nonwovens prepared using the monolayer hot-press method only shows a slight change as nonwoven density increases. Though the two methods exhibit little difference in maximum load, the flexural rigidity of nonwovens prepared using the monolayer hot-press method is much lower, which contributes to superior wear comfort. Finally, we investigated the mechanism behind the stabbing process. Stabbing with an ice pick is a complicated process that involves many factors. Our findings indicate that nonwovens stop penetration primarily in two ways: nonwoven deformation and fiber fractures.

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  • Noriko SHIMASAKI, Katsuaki SHINOHARA, Hideki MORIKAWA
    Type: Original Article
    Volume 55 (2017) Issue 6 Pages 521-528
    Released: December 07, 2017
    [Advance publication] Released: October 05, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    For occupational safety, healthcare workers must select and wear appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE), protective clothing, and masks as countermeasures against exposure to infectious body fluids and blood splash. It is important for healthcare workers to ensure the protective performance of each PPE against penetration of pathogens. The International Standards Organization (ISO) 22609 test evaluates the effectiveness of medical facemasks to protect against penetration of splashed synthetic blood. However, in this method, the protective performance is determined only visually, without quantification of leaked liquid volume. Therefore, in this study, we modified the ISO 22609 test method to quantify the volume of leaked liquid and obtain a more accurate assessment of the protection performance. We tested non-woven and woven materials used for masks or protective clothing, and the performance of each material was classified using this new method. We found that the quantity of leaked synthetic blood was dependent on the structural characteristics of each material. These findings will allow healthcare workers to select the most appropriate PPE for a given situation or task.

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  • Ronald HEUS, Emiel A. DENHARTOG
    Type: Original Article
    Volume 55 (2017) Issue 6 Pages 529-536
    Released: December 07, 2017
    [Advance publication] Released: October 03, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    To determine safe working conditions in emergency situations at petro-chemical plants in the Netherlands a study was performed on three protective clothing combinations (operator's, firefighter's and aluminized). The clothing was evaluated at four different heat radiation levels (3.0, 4.6, 6.3 and 10.0 k∙W∙m-2) in standing and walking posture with a thermal manikin RadMan™. Time till pain threshold (43°C) is set as a cut-off criterion for regular activities. Operator's clothing did not fulfil requirements to serve as protective clothing for necessary activities at heat radiation levels above 1.5 k∙W∙m-2 as was stated earlier by Den Hartog and Heus1). With firefighter's clothing it was possible to work almost three min up to 4.6 k∙W∙m-2. At higher heat radiation levels firefighter's clothing gave insufficient protection and aluminized clothing should be used. Maximum working times in aluminized clothing at 6.3 k∙W∙m-2 was about five min. At levels of 10.0 k∙W∙m-2 (emergency conditions) emergency responders should move immediately to lower heat radiation levels.

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  • Kirsi JUSSILA, Sirkka RISSANEN, Anna AMINOFF, Jens WAHLSTRÖM, Arild VA ...
    Type: Original Article
    Volume 55 (2017) Issue 6 Pages 537-548
    Released: December 07, 2017
    [Advance publication] Released: October 11, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    Workers in the Arctic open-pit mines are exposed to harsh weather conditions. Employers are required to provide protective clothing for workers. This can be the outer layer, but sometimes also inner or middle layers are provided. This study aimed to determine how Arctic open-pit miners protect themselves against cold and the sufficiency, and the selection criteria of the garments. Workers' cold experiences and the clothing in four Arctic open-pit mines in Finland, Sweden, Norway and Russia were evaluated by a questionnaire (n=1,323). Basic thermal insulation (Icl) of the reported clothing was estimated (ISO 9920). The Icl of clothing from the mines were also measured by thermal manikin (standing/walking) in 0.3 and 4.0 m/s wind. The questionnaire showed that the Icl of the selected clothing was on average 1.2 and 1.5 clo in mild (-5 to +5°C) and dry cold (-20 to -10°C) conditions, respectively. The Icl of the clothing measured by thermal manikin was 1.9–2.3 clo. The results show that the Arctic open-pit miners' selected their clothing based on occupational (time outdoors), environmental (temperature, wind, moisture) and individual factors (cold sensitivity, general health). However, the selected clothing was not sufficient to prevent cooling completely at ambient temperatures below -10°C.

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  • Thomas E. BERNARD, Candi D. ASHLEY, Ximena P. GARZON, Jung-Hyun KIM, A ...
    Type: Original Article
    Volume 55 (2017) Issue 6 Pages 549-554
    Released: December 07, 2017
    [Advance publication] Released: October 14, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    Wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT) index is used by many professionals in combination with metabolic rate and clothing adjustments to assess whether a heat stress exposure is sustainable. The progressive heat stress protocol is a systematic method to prescribe a clothing adjustment value (CAV) from human wear trials, and it also provides an estimate of apparent total evaporative resistance (Re,T,a). It is clear that there is a direct relationship between the two descriptors of clothing thermal effects with diminishing increases in CAV at high Re,T,a. There were data to suggest an interaction of CAV and Re,T,a with relative humidity at high evaporative resistance. Because human trials are expensive, manikin data can reduce the cost by considering the static total evaporative resistance (Re,T,s). In fact, as the static evaporative resistance increases, the CAV increases in a similar fashion as Re,T,a. While the results look promising that Re,T,s can predict CAV, some validation remains, especially for high evaporative resistance. The data only supports air velocities near 0.5 m/s.

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  • Anugrah SHAW, Ana Carla COLEONE-CARVALHO, Julien HOLLINGSHURST, Michae ...
    Type: Original Article
    Volume 55 (2017) Issue 6 Pages 555-563
    Released: December 07, 2017
    [Advance publication] Released: October 14, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    A collaborative approach, involving resources and expertise from several countries, was used to develop a test cell to measure cumulative permeation by a solid-state collection technique. The new technique was developed to measure the permeation of pesticide active ingredients and other chemicals with low vapor pressure that would otherwise be difficult to test via standard techniques. The development process is described and the results from the final chosen test method are reported. Inter-laboratory studies were conducted to further refine the new method and determine repeatability and reliability. The revised test method has been approved as a new ISO/EN standard to measure permeation of chemicals with low vapor pressure and/or solubility in water.

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  • Ole Petter NAESGAARD, Tore Christian Bjørsvik STORHOLMEN, Øystein Nord ...
    Type: Original Article
    Volume 55 (2017) Issue 6 Pages 564-574
    Released: December 07, 2017
    [Advance publication] Released: October 17, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    Petroleum operations in the Barents Sea require personal protective clothing (PPC) to ensure the safety and performance of the workers. This paper describes the accomplishment of a user-centred design process of new PPC for offshore workers operating in this area. The user-centred design process was accomplished by mixed-methods. Insights into user needs and context of use were established by group interviews and on-the-job observations during a field-trip. The design was developed based on these insights, and refined by user feedback and participatory design. The new PPC was evaluated via field-tests and cold climate chamber tests. The insight into user needs and context of use provided useful input to the design process and contributed to tailored solutions. Providing users with clothing prototypes facilitated participatory design and iterations of design refinement. The group interviews following the final field test showed consensus of enhanced user satisfaction compared to PPC in current use. The final cold chamber test indicated that the new PPC provides sufficient thermal protection during the 60 min of simulated work in a wind-chill temperature of -25°C. Conclusion: Accomplishing a user-centred design process contributed to new PPC with enhanced user satisfaction and included relevant functional solutions.

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Short Communications
  • Nobuyuki SHIBATA
    Type: Short Communication
    Volume 55 (2017) Issue 6 Pages 575-579
    Released: December 07, 2017
    [Advance publication] Released: October 05, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    Anti-vibration gloves have been used in real workplaces to reduce vibration transmitted through hand-held power tools to the hand. Generally materials used for vibration attenuation in gloves are resilient materials composed of certain synthetic and/or composite polymers. The mechanical characteristics of the resilient materials used in anti-vibration gloves are prone to be influenced by environmental conditions such as temperature, humidity, and photo-irradiation, which cause material degradation and aging. This study focused on the influence of shelf aging on the vibration attenuation performance of air-packaged anti-vibration gloves following 2 yr of shelf aging. Effects of shelf aging on the vibration attenuation performance of anti-vibration gloves were examined according to the Japan industrial standard JIS T8114 test protocol. The findings indicate that shelf aging induces the reduction of vibration attenuation performance in air-packaged anti-vibration gloves.

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  • Masatake YAMAUCHI, Sachiko SAKUMA
    Type: Short Communication
    Volume 55 (2017) Issue 6 Pages 580-583
    Released: December 07, 2017
    [Advance publication] Released: October 11, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    Health effects caused by ionizing radiations raise considerable concern among general public and radiation workers. To estimate ability of personal protective equipment (PPE) materials that reduce toxic effects of ionizing radiations, we developed an experimental bioassay system using Chinese Hamster V79 cells. The system developed here distinguished the biological effectiveness of X-ray that was significantly affected by elements composed of shielding materials. Survival of the cells exposed to sub-lethal dose of X-ray was enhanced more than 2 times when the X-ray was filtrated by a lead plate. Also filtration of the X-ray with a tungsten plate enhanced the cell survival more than three times. These results suggested the colony assay system developed here was useful for examination of the biological effectiveness of X-ray and the ability of PPE materials reducing the toxic effects caused by ionizing radiations.

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