Journal of Volunteer Studies
Online ISSN : 2434-1851
Print ISSN : 1345-9511
Volume 17
Showing 1-21 articles out of 21 articles from the selected issue
  • Sumiko OGAWA
    2017 Volume 17 Pages 3-4
    Published: 2017
    Released: June 01, 2020
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  • Tsuneo YAMADA
    2017 Volume 17 Pages 5-12
    Published: 2017
    Released: June 01, 2020
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    21st century world is advanced information-driven and knowledge-based society. Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) is a foundation of the society, showing the possibilities to overcome the negative influences by drastic social changes. In addition, ICT has brought about a new frontier, that is, “cyber space”, to the human beings. International volunteer activities are also changing in the interactions of ICT. The new characteristics of ICT-enhanced volunteer activities are ‘distance participation’, ‘participation anytime and anywhere by everyone’, ‘collaborative/cooperative participation’, experience sharing’ and so on. The innovative volunteer activities are expected in ‘emergency communication’, ‘distribution’, ‘publicity and community support’, ‘fund raising’, ‘volunteer recruitment’, ‘education and training’, ‘capacity building and management’, ‘safe and secure” and so on. Volunteer activities in cyber space, that is, “cyber volunteer’, are held in the contexts of counter-cyberbullying, cybercrime prevention, online tutor volunteers and so on. International volunteer activities in 21st century will contain more activities in cyber space and those targeting ICT and the development for the technologies and human resources are indispensable.
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  • A Changing Paradigm
    Kaoru HAYASHI
    2017 Volume 17 Pages 13-21
    Published: 2017
    Released: June 01, 2020
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    We experienced several paradigm shifts in the course of International Development. One of the major shifts which took place in 1990s is a evolution of relationship between the north and the south from “donors and recipients” to “equal partners”. NGOs and Volunteers have played very important roles in the shifts. Another big shift is taking place now. It relates to fundamental changes of capitalism. Anti-globalism is growing with call for national interests. They are undermining basic fabrics of post WW2 international cooperation by disintegrating people by border, nationality, ethnicity, religion and income. The international volunteers have to play key roles in promoting solidarity among people and keep momentum for collective efforts to address global issues.
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  • Dynamics of the Connection between Volunteering and Religiousness
    Hironori YAMAGUCHI
    2017 Volume 17 Pages 23-30
    Published: 2017
    Released: June 01, 2020
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    This paper discusses a connection between volunteering and religiousness from 1995 Great Hanshin earthquake to 2011 Tohoku earthquake and tsunami. In Japan, the national government used particular religions to govern the country; such as Buddhism in the medieval period and Shintoism in the modernization. Voluntary actions were lead by some spirituality under the Constitution of Japan, established after the World War II. This paper treats religious actors as faith-related organizations not as faith-based organizations. As stated Tatsuya Shirahase’s research (2015) on the sociology of religion. Furthermore, from another study on the sociology of religion, Keishin Inaba (2011) projected many kinds of activities in the stricken areas of Tohoku earthquake. Based on a comparison among about 20 years practice with these former studies, voluntaryism for seeking a proper governance and nomadization of volunteering were already apparent in the action by faith-related organizations.
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  • Seiji UTSUMI
    2017 Volume 17 Pages 31-33
    Published: 2017
    Released: June 01, 2020
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  • Nobutaka MIYAHARA
    2017 Volume 17 Pages 37-39
    Published: 2017
    Released: June 01, 2020
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  • A Third Sector Initiative in Community Building in Kurume City
    Nobutaka MIYAHARA
    2017 Volume 17 Pages 41-44
    Published: 2017
    Released: June 01, 2020
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  • Third Sector Efforts to Fill Gaps between Recipients and Suppliers in International Assistance: Looking at Cases in the Philippines and East Timor
    Nobutaka MIYAHARA
    2017 Volume 17 Pages 45-51
    Published: 2017
    Released: June 01, 2020
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  • 2017 Volume 17 Pages 55-65
    Published: 2017
    Released: June 01, 2020
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  • Yoichi TAKAMURA
    2017 Volume 17 Pages 67-68
    Published: 2017
    Released: June 01, 2020
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  • Yasuhide NAKAMURA
    2017 Volume 17 Pages 69-70
    Published: 2017
    Released: June 01, 2020
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  • Seiji UTSUMI
    2017 Volume 17 Pages 71-72
    Published: 2017
    Released: June 01, 2020
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  • Interview Survey in a Catholic Community-based Japanese Language Class in Adachi City
    Shunsuke Nukuzuma
    2017 Volume 17 Pages 75-86
    Published: 2017
    Released: June 01, 2020
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    This study focuses on the teaching process in a Catholic community-based Japanese language class for foreign families in Adachi city. The study considers the framework of the “sense of belonging” theory. The methodology was an interview survey (semi-structured interviews) and the participants (Father D, Sister E, the headmaster of the class F, and staff G) were four staff members of the language class. In conclusion, through the results of the qualitative survey, this research clarified that the language class followed three processes: 1. daily life support for foreign families, 2. mental healthcare for foreign students displaying truancy, and 3. support in studies and high school entrance exams for foreign students belonging to Japanese public schools. First, with regard to the “sense of belonging” theory, the class displayed both aspects, namely a “place for better relationships,” which perceives the lives of foreign families as important and a “place for foreigners’ social status and their future.” Second, the class can also be regarded as a “place for better relationships for truant students” as the class structure supports and enables them to build personal relationships with other people. Finally, the class is also positioned as a “social place,” which allows foreign students to completely focus on the development of their social abilities.
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  • Seiko KUROSE
    2017 Volume 17 Pages 89-103
    Published: 2017
    Released: June 01, 2020
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    Pierre Ceresole, born in Switzerland in 1879, was a pacifist who continued pursuing true peace in Switzerland in the times of two Great Wars. With the outbreak of World War I, Ceresole returned home in a hurry from Kobe where he had been living. Switzerland was at the time a permanently neutral country, but both armament and military service were seen as duties for the nation.The impetus for Ceresole’s peace movement was the imprisonment a village schoolteacher as a conscientious objector in Switzerland during World War I in 1915. This was the first such imprisonment. He said. “Do not punish the person that refuses military service for reasons of conscience, but rather let such a person be engaged in an international work camp as a substitute form of service.” He appealed to the general public at the same time for “conscientious refusal to pay military taxes.” In 1920, just after the end of World War I, Ceresole organized the first international work camp in the suburbs of Verdun in France. The camp was successful, and he established the Service Civil International (SCI), which sponsored work camps to aid victims of disaster both in Switzerland and abroad. This camping was international, and run not by the armed forces that protected a country, but by the Service Civil International, and for people of the whole world. Ceresole also wanted this camp to serve as substitute labor for conscientious objectors. Maintaining good relations with the Swiss military forces, he received their support as well. In 1991, substitute labor for conscientious objectors was made legal in Switzerland. International work camps, which began for the purpose of peace building after World War I, are today held all over the world.
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  • Focusing on the Activities of the Civil Society
    Euna SONG, Jun KAWAGUCHI
    2017 Volume 17 Pages 105-114
    Published: 2017
    Released: June 01, 2020
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    In this paper, we are going to try to clarify the feature of international cooperation in South Korea regarding the development process. The system of international cooperation in South Korea is similar to that in Japan, for instance, KOICA is often called “Korean JICA”. However, we recognized some unique characteristics of South Korea, such as the facts or “the concept of aid”. It can be said that in the process where South Korea had developed its own international cooperation, South Korea did not merely follow European or Japanese aid model, but the civil society matured its assistance culture. In particular, based on the field research, we discovered that two stakeholders, NGO and the economic activity organization, occupied the important position. In contrast to Japan, a lot of Christian NGOs had been established, and the support activity by Christian organizations is most conducted in Asia, which is one of the feature of South Korean assistance culture. Also, I noticed that the Christian mission in South Korea is closely related to the volunteer. In addition, I found it as one of the characteristics that in the process where the volunteer activity had been gradually institutionalized and organized, Christianity had an important role as one of the assistance sector.
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  • Keigo MOMOSE
    2017 Volume 17 Pages 115-126
    Published: 2017
    Released: June 01, 2020
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    The recognition of human rights spread around the world after the establishment of the United Nations and the proclamation of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. In the 1960s, just as the viewpoint of women in development (WID) emerged in the field of development, feminism’s second wave began in the US as a civil movement influenced by movements for peace and the elimination of racial discrimination. On this foundation, the UN began hosting World Conferences on Women in 1975 as fora for discussing issues pertaining to women. Subsequently, women’s issues were mainstreamed in international society starting with their incorporation in thematic international meetings and leading to increased visibility of women’s presence in myriad issues and fora. Furthermore, a new concept of human rights for women was introduced in the 4th World Conference on Women in 1995, along with several other issues like violence against women and sexual self-determination. This was the first time that such rights were recognized in international society. The author analyzes shifts in these streams of issues pertaining to women from the view of grassroots activists, while investigating factors underpinning contemporary “gender mainstreaming”.
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  • Akiko MURATA
    2017 Volume 17 Pages 129-138
    Published: 2017
    Released: June 01, 2020
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    The philosophical foundation of service learning is based on a concept of reciprocity such that student participants provide service to communities based on their needs, and in exchange, they gain learning experiences from the community. However, the concept of reciprocity is often used by researchers and practitioners as a program ideal or as rhetoric without clearly defining its meaning, and there is very little research conducted on how such reciprocity is designed and constructed in actual programs. This paper thus examines the concept of reciprocity in service learning based on an analytical framework proposed by Dostilio, Brackmann, Edwards et al. (2012), and analyzes how reciprocity is constructed in an actual program by focusing on an international service learning program that consists of Japanese-language volunteers and multicultural fieldwork.
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  • Jun KAWAGUCHI
    2017 Volume 17 Pages 141-142
    Published: 2017
    Released: June 01, 2020
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  • Naonori KUSAKABE
    2017 Volume 17 Pages 143-144
    Published: 2017
    Released: June 01, 2020
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  • Reiko MORISADA
    2017 Volume 17 Pages 145-146
    Published: 2017
    Released: June 01, 2020
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  • Yasuhiko KAMIYA
    2017 Volume 17 Pages 147-148
    Published: 2017
    Released: June 01, 2020
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