Journal of Applied Glycoscience
Online ISSN : 1880-7291
Print ISSN : 1344-7882
Advance online publication
Advance online publication

This service provides final online versions of articles before they are compiled and published in an issue.

Showing 1-3 articles out of 3 articles from Advance online publication
    • |<
    • <
    • 1
    • >
    • >|
  • Hitomi Ichinose, Kentaro Suzuki, Mari Michikawa, Haruna Sato, Masahiro ...
    Article ID: jag.JAG-2017_018
    [Advance publication] Released: December 29, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS ADVANCE PUBLICATION

    Highly thermostable β-mannanase, belonging to glycoside hydrolase family 5 subfamily 7, was purified from the culture supernatant of Talaromyces trachyspermus B168 and the cDNA of its transcript was cloned. The recombinant enzyme showed maximal activity at pH 4.5 and 85 °C. It retained more than 90 % of its activity below 60 °C. Obtaining the crystal structure of the enzyme helped us to understand the mechanism of its thermostability. An antiparallel β-sheet, salt-bridges, hydrophobic packing, proline residues in the loops, and loop shortening are considered to be related to the thermostability of the enzyme. The enzyme hydrolyzed mannans such as locust bean gum, carob galactomannan, guar gum, konjac glucomannan, and ivory nut mannan. It hydrolyzed 50.7 % of the total mannans from coffee waste, producing mannooligosaccharides. The enzyme has the highest optimum temperature among the known fungal β-mannanases and has potential for use in industrial applications.

    View full abstract
    Download PDF (2337K)
  • Ryuichiro Suzuki, Zui Fujimoto, Satoshi Kaneko, Tsunemi Hasegawa, Atsu ...
    Article ID: jag.JAG-2017_011
    [Advance publication] Released: December 25, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS ADVANCE PUBLICATION

    Glycoside hydrolases require carboxyl groups as catalysts for their activity. A retaining xylanase from Streptomyces olivaceoviridis E-86 belonging to glycoside hydrolase family 10 possesses Glu128 and Glu236 that respectively function as acid/base and nucleophile. We previously developed a unique mutant of the retaining xylanase, N127S/E128H, whose deglycosylation is triggered by azide. A crystallographic study reported that the transient formation of a Ser–His catalytic dyad in the reaction cycle possibly reduced the azidolysis reaction. In the present study, we engineered a catalytic dyad with enhanced stability by site-directed mutagenesis and crystallographic study of N127S/E128H. Comparison of the Michaelis complexes of N127S/E128H with pNP-X2 and with xylopentaose showed that Ser127 could form an alternative hydrogen bond with Thr82, which disrupts the formation of the Ser–His catalytic dyad. The introduction of T82A mutation in N127S/E128H produces an enhanced first-order rate constant (6 times that of N127S/E128H). We confirmed the presence of a stable Ser–His hydrogen bond in the Michaelis complex of the triple mutant, which forms the productive tautomer of His128 that acts as an acid catalyst. Because the glycosyl azide is applicable in the bioconjugation of glycans by using click chemistry, the enzyme-assisted production of the glycosyl azide may contribute to the field of glycobiology.

    View full abstract
    Download PDF (1621K)
  • Satoko Miura, Naoko Crofts, Misato Abe, Koji Murai, Keiko Iwaki, Shuz ...
    Article ID: jag.JAG-2017_012
    [Advance publication] Released: December 21, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS ADVANCE PUBLICATION

    In cereals, granule-bound starch synthase I (GBSSI)-deficient mutants accumulate glutinous (amylose-free) starch in their storage tissues. The amylose-free starch produced by waxy (wx) mutants of hexaploid bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is used in cakes and breads. However, wx mutants of diploid wheat (T. monococcum L.) have so far no commercial applications. In this study, we identified a mutation in exon 6 of GBSSI in a diploid wheat wx mutant that resulted in the replacement of Trp355 with a stop codon. Molecular markers were developed for the rapid screening of the mutation, which should allow the selection of heterozygous and homozygous plants during backcrossing. This will facilitate the improvement of the agricultural traits of the wx mutant and the generation of new amylose-free wx lines.

    View full abstract
    Download PDF (868K)
    • |<
    • <
    • 1
    • >
    • >|
feedback
Top