Japanese Journal of Qualitative Psychology
Online ISSN : 2435-7065
Volume 11 , Issue 1
Showing 1-9 articles out of 9 articles from the selected issue
  • Hiroki Maeda, Yumi Nishimura
    2012 Volume 11 Issue 1 Pages 7-25
    Published: 2012
    Released: July 08, 2020
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    This paper describes the collaborative work of palliative care nurses in an acute medical ward - an ethnomethodology in which multiple participants collaborate to acknowledge, share information on, and manage patients’ pain. First, we outline the palliative care history of a female cancer patient based on interviews with nurses, who report that they acknowledge her condition has stabilized. Second, we analyze a video of a palliative care conference to explicate how this acknowledgement is shared among other nurses. During the conference, an experienced nurse quotes the words of the patient that indicate she has no pain, and this process helps a junior nurse to understand the situation. Third, we analyze the video of a handover, during which the night staff reports that the patient claimed of pain and received rescue medication. From this analysis, we were able to explicate how the pain control/caring plan was decided on the basis of this information sharing. Finally, by analyzing field notes, we understand that the practical management of medication involves collaborative work by many participants in the nursing station.
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  • In-depth Conversations between Siblings of People with Disabilities
    Mariko Harada, Masahiro Nochi
    2012 Volume 11 Issue 1 Pages 26-44
    Published: 2012
    Released: July 08, 2020
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    This study explores how siblings of people with disabilities live their lives. In-depth conversations were held on several occasions between two people who had siblings with disabilities and the first author of this article. In such conversations, the interviewer also narrated her experience as a sibling, since narratives are constructed through interactions between the speaker and the listener. The analysis focused on specific aspects that revealed information regarding their past and future lives, and the process of the in-depth conversation was also highlighted. The results showed that the interviewees had varied experiences as siblings of people with disabilities, but they typically had a "double life story," which represented their own and their siblings’ lives. Meanwhile, they differed in the extent to which they were willing to live independently, and they had ambivalent feelings toward independence. By considering the meanings of independence and interdependence, the siblings may be able to find an alternative lifestyle, which goes beyond the dichotomy between living independently and living with their families.
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  • Hearing Narratives of "Turning Point" by Congenital Heart Disease Patients
    Tomoyuki Suzuki
    2012 Volume 11 Issue 1 Pages 45-62
    Published: 2012
    Released: July 08, 2020
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    To understand the social problems confronted by adult patients with congenital heart disease we conducted interviews to underscore their experiences of their illness within their overall life histories. Although many participants presented stories of a "turning point" experienced in the past, the full meaning of their stories was not always selfevident because these responses emerged not only from the setting and framework of the interview but also from using a narrative approach in the research. Although narratives offer an understanding of individual experiences over time, a story presented on a specific occasion from a particular point of view cannot include all the important aspects of the experiences of the actor or narrator. The events comprising the main plot do not include the ostensibly empty periods. Yet, these apparently vacant periods must be considered in order to understand explicit narratives involving turning points because changes in life trajectories require not only trigger events but also conditions that are sufficient for such events to make an impact. Stories of turning points must leave room for our imaginations to compensate for the blank spaces in a narrative, which are sometimes interpreted as "stagnant times".
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  • Through Description and Analysis of Author’s Own Life-World Experiences
    Maki Fujii
    2012 Volume 11 Issue 1 Pages 63-80
    Published: 2012
    Released: July 08, 2020
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    We generally understand that the ability to appreciate feelings of another person through a subjective identification with them as "empathy." However, the concept of empathy is not what we actually experience as we’re deeply committed to others. Based on this recognition as one living person, this study inductively aims to grasp the actual feelings developed among people as "being with another person," referring to the author’s own life-world experiences in details and to analyze the actualities of "being with another person." As a result, the following two experiential aspects have been clarified: for "being with another person," 1) we can live in the inter-subjective world based on a perceptual body and 2) we can be in an inter-subjective relationship, overcoming being a private entity. These considerations lead to the findings that superficially understanding another person in the scene of psychological support is inadequate and that we really need to share deeply connected relationships one another.
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  • By Using the Schedule for the Evaluation of Individual Quality of Life-Direct Weighting (SEIQOL-DW)
    Mari Fukuda, Tatsuya Sato
    2012 Volume 11 Issue 1 Pages 81-95
    Published: 2012
    Released: July 08, 2020
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Health-related QOL (HRQOL) has been the focus of a particularly bodily function of research. However, many instruments used to measure HRQOL focus narrowly on physical functioning and well-being related to the disease itself. When these instruments have been used in relation to Nambyo (intractable diseases), and in the service of palliative care, this problem has been exacerbated. Thus, the purpose of this study was to longitudinally measure the individual QOL of person with muscular dystrophy using The Schedule for the Evaluation of Individual Quality of Life-Direct Weighting (SEIQOL-DW), by asking participant to assess his condition once per year for a 3-year period. This instrument facilitates discussion of both QOL per se as well as issues related to daily life. Additionally, each factor identified as a contributor to QOL was analyzed in terms of the symptoms and life events experienced by participants. This study elucidated the process underlying the construction and reconstruction of narratives about QOL and, thereby, provides a method for clearly understanding the lives of individuals with progressive and refractory symptoms.
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  • Based on "Thick Description" of Home-care
    Tomoo Hidaka, Shodo Mizuki, Tatsuya Sato
    2012 Volume 11 Issue 1 Pages 96-114
    Published: 2012
    Released: July 08, 2020
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    In this study, we focused on the life of a patient with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in a home-care situation and described his relationship with caregivers. The purpose of this study was to present a complete picture of a patient in home care and the actor who is most important in home activities through participant observation. The results of analysis1 can be summarized as follows: (1) the position of the patient includes not only "patient" but also "liver"; (2) the top priority of the rule of the field is to minimize his passivity; (3) the potential of communication of the patient involves the rule of the field. Analysis2 revealed that a technical peer supporter provides communication support suitable for the field.
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  • Tsuneo Watanabe
    2012 Volume 11 Issue 1 Pages 116-135
    Published: 2012
    Released: July 08, 2020
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The " 'I-am-me' experience", which was first investigated by the phenomenologist Spiegelberg (1964), is currently studied by using non-phenomenological methods. I have outlined the phenomenological approach to investigating this phenomenon. First, I have discussed analyzing past research on the I-am-me experience from the phenomenological perspective. Then, I conducted a phenomenological analysis of a typical case of an I-am-me experience based on Giorgi’s (2009) modified Husserlian approach and compared it to Kimura’s (1973) analysis of a schizophrenia case. I also conducted a similar analysis of a typical case of a "solipsistic experience," once regarded as a type of an I-am-me experience, and compared it to an autistic case. Based on the consideration of the Blankenburg's "schizophrenic epochè", I have proposed the idea that the I-am-me experience and the solipsistic experience may originate from a "developmental epochè". One may experience a disruption of the self-evidence of the self at certain stages of normal personal development, especially in childhood, even though one is neither a philosopher undertaking a phenomenological epochè, nor a patient suffering from a psychopathological epochè.
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  • Tomoko Higashimura
    2012 Volume 11 Issue 1 Pages 136-155
    Published: 2012
    Released: July 08, 2020
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The meaning of Jiritsu (Japanese for independence) for disabled people, particularly in relation to employment, was investigated based on their mothers’ narratives. Narratives were collected through a group interview between a researcher, a welfare institution staff member and two mothers whose daughters had recently found employment, as well as subsequent separate interviews with each mother. By analyzing the narrative data from the group interview, five narrative forms were identified. The mothers’ narratives constructed through these narrative forms diverged from results in the separate interviews in that issues related to "after the parents’ deaths" were latently expressed. Based on these findings I argued that: (1) the mothers’ narratives involved a contradiction caused by the discrepancy between present and future perspectives; (2) reconstructing the relationship between the mother and the child was required for both of them to achieve Jiritsu; and (3) talking about Jiritsu as a goal for their children was important for the mothers in striving for it.
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  • Nahoko Takahashi, Yoko Yamada
    2012 Volume 11 Issue 1 Pages 156-175
    Published: 2012
    Released: July 08, 2020
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    This paper describes the quality of the support practices of care workers in a Children’s Home by means of a network involving a Children’s Home and the children’s birth families, schools, and consultation center, using models of different phases. We constructed a model of the framework of the support system around a Children’s Home and interviewed eight care workers from three Children’s Homes. We focused on the networks involving the Children’s Home and the children’s birth families in the analysis, because this networks contain various points, like complexity of relationships between children and their family, impacts on children’s daily life and difficulties of homecoming, and it is needed to analyse this network in detail. We constructed a model that describes the actual support practices. This model describes the changing roles of the care worker as a support giver in daily practice in the Children’s Home and as a mediator for each network. Finally, we describe the support a care worker provided in an actual case and the dynamics of the support practices using the model.
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