Social and Economic Systems Studies: The Journal of the Japan Association for Social and Economic Systems Studies
Online ISSN : 2432-6550
Print ISSN : 0913-5472
Volume 37
Showing 1-11 articles out of 11 articles from the selected issue
  • [in Japanese], [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    2016 Volume 37 Pages 1-18
    Published: October 25, 2016
    Released: October 09, 2020
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japane ...
    Type: Article
    2016 Volume 37 Pages 19-56
    Published: October 25, 2016
    Released: October 09, 2020
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • -A Case of Consumer Activity in Digital Contents Market-
    Hao LEE
    Type: Article
    2016 Volume 37 Pages 57-66
    Published: October 25, 2016
    Released: October 09, 2020
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

     If the agent base model is classified based on the granularity, it can be classified into three types. A simple abstracted simple model is an “Abstract Model.” “Facsimile Model” maps a limited reality society and details are described. “Middle Range Model” is constructed with the abstraction degree between the above two types. The importance of “Facsimile Model” has been pointed out due to sophis- tication of information technology, and improvement of methodology to describe agent attributes and behavioral guidelines are desired to construct a more realistic model.

     In this research, we perform a questionnaire survey to acquire single source data, and an estima- tion of digital content consumer parameters is attempted using factor analysis that is one of multivar- iate analysis.

     Conclusions of this study are as follows. (1) Perform a questionnaire survey to gather single source data and analyze the data by factor analysis are helpful to construct an agent-based model. (2) After the agent-based modeling, a hybrid-gaming simulation is proper to verify the reasonability of the model (3) To fit the consumer parameters to sales of digital contents, another analysis to classify the attribute of contents is needed.

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  • Akira IGARASHI, Yuhsuke KOYAMA
    Type: Article
    2016 Volume 37 Pages 67-76
    Published: October 25, 2016
    Released: October 09, 2020
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

     Study of Otaku has a lot of speculative researches but few quantitative ones. We conducted the questionnaire research for 681 students in five universities to estimate the degree involvement in Otaku activities. The results are as follows: 1)Four factors are detected which are self-affirmative enthusiasm to hobby, collector, sympathy toward other Otakus by sharing hobby interests, and paying no attention to fashion. these factors are classified into two groups: maniac activities and lack of communication skills. 2)There is no relationship one’s self-acknowledgement of Otaku and his social skills. 3)Two oppo- sites of Otaku exists. The one is Ria-ju repletion of real life, which is a Japanese internet slang for people who are sociable to everyone. The other is the man has low social skills and no motivation for anything.

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  • - The Analysis of Management Strategies and Resources of Console Game Company Level-5 -
    Nobushige HICHIBE
    Type: Article
    2016 Volume 37 Pages 77-84
    Published: October 25, 2016
    Released: October 09, 2020
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

     Level-5 which was a small game development company in Fukuoka at first has developed big hits one after another and expanded its market share in the mature console game industry. In this paper, by analyzing its management strategies and resources as functions of its success in the oligopolistic mature industry, I examine the effective means for small and medium-sized companies to survive and grow in mature industry.

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  • Kotaro OGINO, Koji KANAGAWA
    Type: Article
    2016 Volume 37 Pages 85-94
    Published: October 25, 2016
    Released: October 09, 2020
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

     This thesis conducted quantitative research on the prefectural and municipal volunteer centers in Japan, which are generally referred to as “public nonprofit organization (NPO) centers.” In Japan, a number of public NPO centers have been established by local governments across the country. Cur- rently, such establishments are located in two-thirds of all prefectures and one-third of all cities. In fact, Japan’s local municipalities have been engaging in some or the other kind of NPO program since the NPO Law was enacted in 1998. The establishment of an NPO center is comparatively more expensive than others. However, in recent years, some of these centers have been criticized for deviating too far from the realistic expectations of each region. Such criticism arises not only from the local third sector but also from within the administrative management.

     The first criticism is that the services provided by these centers do not complement regional NPO needs. This was due to the fact that public NPO centers were routinely set up to meet administrative requirements against the wishes of the local third sectors. The results of this quantitative research revealed that Japan’s public NPO centers were launched simultaneously around 2002 and 2006, in accordance with the revision of laws and ordinances related to corporate bodies and administrative management.

     The second criticism of NPO centers pertains to how local governments handled outsource proj- ects. It was argued that some local governments persisted with projects which served their own agen- da rather than that of the local community. The public sector has particularly received strong criticism for penetrating NPO outsourcing under administrative control. Some people are concerned that such an administrative method might undermine the autonomy of the third sector. It is possible that such problems are caused by “institutional pressure,” that is, the public sector must achieve a certain level of performance record through NPO outsourcing. Our quantitative research also showed that many local governments often base their decisions in NPO outsourcing on the grounds that “the utilization of the designated manager system has specifically been requested by the administrative management.”

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  • Tomoki YAMADA, Hideyuki TANAKA
    Type: Article
    2016 Volume 37 Pages 95-100
    Published: October 25, 2016
    Released: October 09, 2020
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

     It is commonly believed that financial inclusion can help improve lives of people suffering from pov- erty. Since the emergence of M-PESA in Kenya, mobile financial services (MFS) have been attracted attention as a new pathway towards financial inclusion. However, due to lack of available data on new services, the factors affecting the use of mobile financial services are remained to be elucidated. This paper aims to explore these factors by multiple regression analysis using the national-level data.

     In order to make a model, “Used an account to make a transaction through a mobile phone” is set as the dependent variable. The independent variables prepared are as follows: land area, total population (logarithmically converted), population density (logarithmically converted), literacy rate, GDP per capita, poverty headcount ratio ($1.90 line), poverty headcount ratio (national line), GINI coefficient, self-employ- ment rate, mobile phone subscription rate, Internet users rate, Cybersecurity index, electrification rate, rate of having account at financial institution, ATMs per capita, commercial bank branches per capita, lending interest rate, competitive condition of telecommunication market, regulatory quality, ease of doing business, commitment to Maya declaration, sub-Sahara Africa dummy.

     The model has shown that the level of non-MFS financial inclusion, population, pro-MFS govern- ment policy, GINI coefficient and membership of sub-Sahara country have statistically significantly positive impact on the use of mobile financial services. On the other hand, population density and ac- cessibility to ATMs and branches have statistically significantly negative impact. These findings could suggest that (1) people who have financial account but less access to ATMs and branches use mobile financial services more as substitute, (2) people in countries with less population density use mobile financial services more because non-MFS financial institutions are uneconomical, (3) low-level literacy prevents people from the use of mobile financial services because most mobile financial services are offered by text, (4) government policy has some impact on the use of mobile financial services, (5) ade- quate market size is required for mobile financial services, and (6) there are still sub-Saharan specific factors other than listed variables above. These results provide new insight into the understanding of mobile financial services towards financial inclusion.

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  • : Dynamism of the Japanese Oral and Dental Care System
    Fukiko KOBAYASHI
    Type: Article
    2016 Volume 37 Pages 101-116
    Published: October 25, 2016
    Released: October 09, 2020
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

     It has been about 150 years since American dentist’s arriving in japan that became an opportunity of the introduction of the modern dentistry, and more than 50 years has been passed since the estab- lishment of a public health insurance system. Today Japan has become the one of the most excellent countries in socialization of oral and dental care, but has a lot of new problems that is characteristic to modern society. In this study, the author conducts the historical thinking of the modern dentistry in Japan, and attempt to interpret the history from a sociological viewpoint. Apart from oral and dental care, the Meiji Government attached great importance to socialization of medical care science the Meiji Restoration. On the contrary, socialization of oral and dental care brought no public notice at that time, except for Dentist’s license system. Dentistry lagged behind medicine in its socialization, the new program for oral health, including promotion of oral health programs and development of the medical benefit for dental disease in the national health insurance system, had proceeded properly after the post-war years of recovery. From these historical thinking, it has derived that the changes of modern dentistry have a great impact on socialization of dentistry in japan. In each period, a level of socializa- tion, namely, the size and contents of public service and system for oral and dental health, had always continued to change in response to each social situations. Recently there are not a few conflict between stakeholders, and it transform the interrelationship among stakeholders.

     Oral health risk greatly involves safety and security in everyday life. Japanese people take great interest in oral and dental care that is linked to improving quality of life, because Japan adopted a public health insurance system which covers all Japanese people in most oral and dental treatment. There are many controversies surrounding the issue of the socialization of dentistry in modern Japan.

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  • Isao YOKOMIZO,, Kazuki ONOCHI, Koki ICHII
    Type: Article
    2016 Volume 37 Pages 117-124
    Published: October 25, 2016
    Released: October 09, 2020
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

     In dairy farms in Japan, there is the case falling into such an immobilized debt that the disposable income cannot fill up for the amount of interest and principal repayment, and living expenditure for a long term. Special Loans for Livestock is an important aid package to get rid of an immobilized debt. However, conflicts occur in the process to get rid of an immobilized debt in not only dairy farms but also their supporting groups. Because it is basic to increase a disposable income by not new investment but cost cut, as a condition to lend Special Loans for Livestock. However, to get rid of an immobilized debt, a dairy farm may need minimum investment truly. This is the element which conflict occurs. In this report, we focused on the conflict of one dairy farm and his supporting groups, clarified such a mechanism that they overcame, and derived future lessons.

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  • Literature Review Regarding Knowledge Sharing Based on Patent Data Analysis
    Hideyuki TANAKA
    Type: Article
    2016 Volume 37 Pages 125-130
    Published: October 25, 2016
    Released: October 09, 2020
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

     Innovation has been getting more important for the enterprise’s growth in the knowledge econo- my. In the open networked era, knowledge sharing among entities is tend to be focused. Prior research- es have tried to gauge levels of innovation output and knowledge sharing.

     This research aims to clarify possibilities of patent data in order to visualize innovation capabilities in the knowledge sharing studies. The author reviews related literature and selects forty-five papers, issued from 1994 to 2016, that empirically visualize capabilities regarding knowledge sharing based on patent data. The paper summarizes related variables such as quantity and quality of innovation output, level of knowledge sharing, level of knowledge stock, diversity/similarity/distance/originality of knowl- edge, geographical factors, and network characteristics. The results might contribute to future research to visualize innovation capability research.

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  • Haruka WATANABE
    Type: Article
    2016 Volume 37 Pages 131-138
    Published: October 25, 2016
    Released: October 09, 2020
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

     Recently, the importance of culture and art in public policy has been increasing from a policy and governance perspective. For such cultural policies, normative studies and many case studies have fo- cused on the process of citizen autonomy in local government, but the role of cultural foundations has been under studied. This study investigates the conditions for success in locally administered cultural faculty. For observing how a cultural faculty administered by cultural foundation, a leading figure in cultural policy, this study focuses on Kani Public Arts Center. This case study illustrates how the arts center supports citizens’ cultural activities.

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