Journal of Research for Nursing Education
Online ISSN : 2432-0242
Print ISSN : 0917-6314
ISSN-L : 0917-6314
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Showing 1-4 articles out of 4 articles from the selected issue
  • Mamiko Ueda, Naomi Funashima, Mika Hattori, Naomi Isene, Tomomi Kameok ...
    2020 Volume 29 Issue 1 Pages 1-9
    Published: March 31, 2020
    Released: June 30, 2020
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
     Writing is essential for the learning, research, and vocational activities of nursing students and nurses including graduate students. They must write when they explain emotions and thoughts to others, share research, and communicate with other health care staff in nursing education and clinical settings. Therefore, it is essential for nursing students and nurses to develop good writing skills. Of the various kinds of writing, systematic writing of knowledge in specialized disciplines is called academic writing. The authors reviewed ten foreign articles on academic writing in nursing education with researchers of science of nursing education. Through the review, the following three points were confirmed as issues in nursing education: i) Curriculum development to support students’ academic writing skills across the course, ii) development of the teacher’s own writing ability and writing teaching ability, and iii) development of support based on research findings for academic writing rather than support based on teachers’ experiences. In addition, the articles make the following three suggestions for further research in science of nursing education: i) accumulation of research focusing on teachers teaching abilities for academic writing, ii) integration of research focusing on students and teachers, and iii) development of a reliable and valid scale to evaluate academic writing ability of nursing students and nurses.
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  • Yumi Minamimoto, Toshiko Nakayama, Naomi Funashima
    2020 Volume 29 Issue 1 Pages 11-24
    Published: March 31, 2020
    Released: June 30, 2020
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
     The study aims to conceptualize the experiences of students dropping out from basic nursing education institutions and to examine their characteristics. We conducted semi-structured interviews and collected data on the experiences of 11 people, who have dropped out for under 5 years, from 6 months prior when they were thinking of it to actually dropping out. Through analyzing the collected data by applying the Methodology for the Conceptualization of Nursing, we created 19 concepts that represent the experiences leading to students dropping out. Some of the concepts include “Expectations for learning nursing and enjoyment of student life”, “Accepting interference of decision to work as a nurse from instructors”, “Hiding the wish to drop out from family and expressing the wish to drop out when the opportunity is given”, and “Activities for achieving new goals by deciding to drop out”. Furthermore, we found that the 19 concepts that represent the experiences leading to students dropping out from them contain 5 characteristics: “While their learning is progressing in an effort to achieve lesson goals, difficulties are faced in the process”, “Overcoming developmental challenges during puberty may be difficult for them”, “As a result of the hierarchical relationship between student and instructor, the student is in a weaker position”, “The process of finally deciding to drop out and expressing it”, and “If new goals are clearly defined, they will work toward them”. Teachers and instructors need to understand that students who have dropped out have experiences with these characteristics.
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  • Shiori Sato, Toshiko Nakayama, Naomi Funashima
    2020 Volume 29 Issue 1 Pages 25-37
    Published: March 31, 2020
    Released: June 30, 2020
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
     The purpose of this research was to discover the learning needs of perioperative nurses and to obtain suggestions for making the learning effective. Participants were 777 nurses, their belonging to the operating department of 52 hospitals across the country. Participants completed a questionnaire that included open-ended questions focusing on nurses learning needs. Of the 372 surveys returned (return rate = 47.9%), 256 were valid responses and used in the analysis. Content analysis for nursing education based on Berelson’s methodology was applied. The analysis identified 36 categories, representing the learning needs of perioperative nurses. They included: (a) Knowledge and skills needed to care for patients under anesthesia, (b) Knowledge of nursing / anatomy / pathology / disease / pharmacology that is the basis of perioperative nursing practice. Agreement rates (Scott’s formula) over 70% for all categories confirmed the reliability of our findings. As a result of the discussion, the learning needs of perioperative nurses ware based on the following: “Fundamentals of nursing practice for surgical patients”,“Special nursing practices for surgical patients”,“Demonstrating expertise for smooth surgery”,“Continuing nursing care for surgical patients”. The results of this research can be used as a guidepost for perceiving learning needs by all perioperative nurses, and can be used by perioperative nurses to learn effectively.
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  • Focusing on the Relationship with the Quality of Nursing Practice
    Akiko Takahashi, Mika Kamikokuryo, Tomomi Kameoka
    2020 Volume 29 Issue 1 Pages 39-53
    Published: March 31, 2020
    Released: June 30, 2020
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
     The purpose of this study is to clarify the relationship between learning activities developed by nurses working at hospitals and the quality of their nursing practice, and to consider effective learning activities connecting to improvement of their nursing practice and challenges to achieve their implementation.
     A conceptual framework was constructed based on literature review. A questionnaire consisting of items which measure demographic characteristics of the participants, questions regarding learning activities, and the Nursing Excellence Scale in Clinical Practice which measures the quality of nursing practice, was used. A questionnaire survey was sent by mail to 91 hospitals in Japan, targeting 1,177 ward nurses with more than 5 years and less than 11 years of clinical experience. 516 responses (43.8%) were received, of which 383 were valid for analysis.
     As a result, 5 types of learning activities, such as “intentionally and systematically ensuring learning opportunities ”, “not leaving questions or matters that are unclear unanswered, but continue to search for understanding based on the evidence until you are convinced ”, “finding opportunities to study in the daily nursing scene and positively utilizing them ”, were related to the quality of nursing practice. In consideration, it is suggested that awareness their responsibility for quality nursing practice, value the importance of learning, value the nursing practice based on evidence, and using this as the foundation for action, are important in order to achieve these five types of learning activities.
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