Japanese Journal of Neurosurgery
Online ISSN : 2187-3100
Print ISSN : 0917-950X
ISSN-L : 0917-950X
Volume 19 , Issue 6
Showing 1-26 articles out of 26 articles from the selected issue
  • Type: Cover
    2010 Volume 19 Issue 6 Pages Cover25-
    Published: June 20, 2010
    Released: June 02, 2017
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  • Type: Cover
    2010 Volume 19 Issue 6 Pages Cover26-
    Published: June 20, 2010
    Released: June 02, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2010 Volume 19 Issue 6 Pages App16-
    Published: June 20, 2010
    Released: June 02, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2010 Volume 19 Issue 6 Pages App17-
    Published: June 20, 2010
    Released: June 02, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2010 Volume 19 Issue 6 Pages App18-
    Published: June 20, 2010
    Released: June 02, 2017
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  • Hiroaki Shimizu, Nobuhiro Mikuni
    Type: Article
    2010 Volume 19 Issue 6 Pages 439-
    Published: June 20, 2010
    Released: June 02, 2017
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  • Toshiro Inubushi
    Type: Article
    2010 Volume 19 Issue 6 Pages 440-446
    Published: June 20, 2010
    Released: June 02, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The application of NMR for the biomedical area is most clearly embodied as MRI, an important diagnostic tool, where the signals obtained by NMR are presented in a visualized image. However, MRI outlines only the structural information of internal organs and the areas of lesions. The cellular and molecular levels properties are not obtainable with an MRI. Some elaborations have been devised to delineate the characters with the aid of cellular and molecular targeting and sensing agents, which lead to so-called Molecular Imaging (MI). One of these agents is paramagnetic nano-particles, which can be loaded into living cells. The tagged cells transplanted into a living system are then visualized via their paramagnetic effect on MRI. In combination with other imaging modalities, such as, PET, US, and bioluminescence and fluorescence imaging, the MI NMR technique will certainly continue to serve as a diagnostic imaging tool in biomedical field.
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  • Yukihiko Fujii, Hitoshi Matsuzawa, Hironaka Igarashi, Tsutomu Nakada
    Type: Article
    2010 Volume 19 Issue 6 Pages 447-454
    Published: June 20, 2010
    Released: June 02, 2017
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    The recent introduction of 3.0T magnetic resonance imaging (3T-MRI) brought about a number of significant changes in neurosurgery, such as improvements in the development of surgical strategies, the preservation of brain functions including cortical and axonal functions, and the detection of brain lesions. The main characteristics of 3T-MRI leading to these changes include increases in signal-to-ratio and magnetic susceptibility, a diminution of T1 contrast, and an enhancement of T2 contrast, which are not only advantageous but also disadvantageous to MR imaging. The advantageous characteristics of 3T-MRI contributed to the development and advancement of various MR imaging techniques, such as T2R (T2 reversed), 3DAC PROPELLER (three-dimensional anisotropy contrast periodically rotated overlapping parallel line with enhanced reconstruction), fMRI (functional MRI), and MRSI (MR spectroscopic imaging). T2R imaging has been found to be the most suitable for routine clinical investigations on 3T-MRI, and it is also capable of providing high-resolution images. 3DAC PROPELLER provides the most efficient single contrast images for any physiological and pathological structural analyses in the clinical setting. Functional analysis utilizing fMRI with 3T-MRI is now considered to be the gold standard for clinical activation studies. Appropriately performed fMRI is capable of providing powerful preoperative information regarding eloquent areas of the brain such as the motor areas and language areas. MRSI, the imaging version of ^1H-MRS, can obtain spatial metabolic information of brain lesions such as brain tumors. On the other hand, several characteristics of 3T-MRI, such as greater susceptibility and diminished T1 contrast, are disadvantageous to MR imaging, resulting in unfavorable effects including fictitious activations in fMRI, susceptibility artifacts and diminished contrast in T1-weighted images. Hence, it is extremely important to utilize 3T-MRI in neurosurgical settings with careful consideration of both its advantages and disadvantages.
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  • Tadashi Nariai
    Type: Article
    2010 Volume 19 Issue 6 Pages 455-463
    Published: June 20, 2010
    Released: June 02, 2017
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    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a powerful imaging modality for visualizing brain function, brain dysfunction, and the metabolism of brain tumors. Though available in many hospitals in Japan as a tool for oncologists, PET is still used on only a limited basis in the neurosurgical field. Drawing from research and clinical experience over the last 20 years, this review is an attempt to summarize the potentials and limitations of PET applied clinically for cerebrovascular disease, brain tumors, epilepsy surgery, and neurotrauma. My expectations of the newest radiolabeled pharmaceuticals and their expanded clinical use in the future are also described.
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  • Mitsunori Matsumae, Tanefumi Baba, Hideki Atsumi
    Type: Article
    2010 Volume 19 Issue 6 Pages 464-470
    Published: June 20, 2010
    Released: June 02, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Integrated imaging equipment offers many advantages in neurosurgical procedures. Today more than 100 intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) units have been installed in hospitals worldwide. Intraoperative MRI is an important tool for brain tumor surgery, because it compensates for brain shift, allows accurate navigation, and provides information about the tumor remnant. This information enables neurosurgeons to perform realtime image-guided surgery. Currently, the MRI technique is used not only for imaging but also in monitoring of intracranial physiological factors such as cerebrospinal fluid flow and brain tissue temperature. This article discusses planning for installation of intraoperative MRI, the advantages of low and high field magnets, MRI safety for intraoperative procedures, and the use of intraoperative imaging for brain tumor surgery. Additionally, we describe prospective uses of intraoperative MRI, such as focused ultrasound system to deliver ablation to various intracranial lesions and an opening in the blood brain barrier.
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  • Kouzo Moritake
    Type: Article
    2010 Volume 19 Issue 6 Pages 471-473
    Published: June 20, 2010
    Released: June 02, 2017
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  • Mitsunori Ozaki, Yoshinobu Seo, Hirohiko Nakamura
    Type: Article
    2010 Volume 19 Issue 6 Pages 474-477
    Published: June 20, 2010
    Released: June 02, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Background: The indications of CT scan after minor head trauma in children are often discussed, including risks of radiation-induced malignancy. Our aim is to identify whether children younger than 2 years have greater risk of traumatic brain injury compared to older children. Methods: We enrolled and analysed 1,830 patients younger than 7 years who underwent CT scans after head trauma in our institute. Patients without any symptoms (n=916) were defined as Group A (age<2: n=391,age 2〜6: n=525). Patients with extracranial traumatic findings such as scalp hematoma or laceration, and without any neurological symptoms (n=600) were defined as Group B (age<2: n=163, age 2〜6: n=437). In order to analyze whether children younger than 2 years have risks of abnormal CT findings due to head trauma, we used the chi-square test in both Group A and Group B. A P-value of less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: In Group A, there was no significant difference in the frequency of abnormal CT findings between the younger and older groups (p=0.526). In Group B, however, there was a significant difference between those groups (p=0.0186). Conclusion: We suggest that, based on our findings, children younger than 2 years without any symptoms don't have a greater risk of brain injury compared to older children after minor head trauma. This study might contribute to save those children from receiving unnecessary radiation.
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  • [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    2010 Volume 19 Issue 6 Pages 477-
    Published: June 20, 2010
    Released: June 02, 2017
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  • Totaro Takeuchi, Kazuo Watanabe, Tsuneo Shimizu
    Type: Article
    2010 Volume 19 Issue 6 Pages 478-483
    Published: June 20, 2010
    Released: June 02, 2017
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    The subjects were shunt-effective iNPH 40 patients. Before and one year after surgery, measurements of the cerebral circulatory dynamics (the cerebral blood flow pattern by ROI setting using ^<123>I-IMP SPECT), and an evaluation of symptoms (gait disturbance: G, dementia: D, urinary incontinence: U) by grading scale (JNPHGSR). (1) Preoperative cerebral circulation and symptoms: As for the each symptoms and blood flow patterns, the severities of G (p=0.017) in whole cortex non-reduction group (thalamus-basal ganglia reduction group) and D (p=0.021) in whole cortex reduction group were obviously high compared with other symptoms particularly. (2) Circulation and symptoms one year after surgery: As the circulatory dynamics at different improvement sites and each symptoms, it was obviously mild for G (p=0.003) in the group with an increased only thalamus-basal ganglia blood flow and increased both whole cortex and thalamus-basal ganglia blood flow and tend to mild for D (p=0.091) in the group with an increased only whole cortex blood flow and increased both whole cortex and thalamus-basal ganglia blood flow compared with other symptoms.
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  • [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    2010 Volume 19 Issue 6 Pages 483-
    Published: June 20, 2010
    Released: June 02, 2017
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  • Toshiyuki Takahashi, Junya Hanakita, Manabu Minami, Fumiaki Honda, Kei ...
    Type: Article
    2010 Volume 19 Issue 6 Pages 484-489
    Published: June 20, 2010
    Released: June 02, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The authors reviewed the results of 77 consecutive patients who underwent transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) from January 2005 to July 2007 at a single institute. The preoperative diagnoses included degenerative or isthmic spondylolisthesis with instability. The average age of the patients in this study was 64.3 years, and there were 33 men and 44 women. All patients were followed clinically for a minimum of 12 months after surgery at a mean of 24.2 months. Clinical outcomes were assessed by the JOA (Japanese Orthopaedic Association) score, the VAS (visual analog scale), and the ODI (Oswestry disability index). Radiological findings and fusion rate were also investigated. Clinical recovery of all patients regarding outcome measures was significant at any time of the follow-up (p>0.01). Minor surgical complications and reoperation occurred in 9.1% and 5.2% of patients respectivelly. There was a 2.6% incidence of postoperative transient radiculopathy without major complications including permanent neurologic deficit. Fusion success was observed in 97.5% of surgical sites. TLIF is a safe and effective method of achieving lumbar fusion resulting in a high fusion success rate and a significant clinical recovery of the patients without serious and permanent surgical complications.
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  • [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    2010 Volume 19 Issue 6 Pages 490-
    Published: June 20, 2010
    Released: June 02, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2010 Volume 19 Issue 6 Pages 491-492
    Published: June 20, 2010
    Released: June 02, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2010 Volume 19 Issue 6 Pages 492-
    Published: June 20, 2010
    Released: June 02, 2017
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    Download PDF (161K)
  • Type: Appendix
    2010 Volume 19 Issue 6 Pages 492-
    Published: June 20, 2010
    Released: June 02, 2017
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    Download PDF (161K)
  • Type: Appendix
    2010 Volume 19 Issue 6 Pages 493-494
    Published: June 20, 2010
    Released: June 02, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2010 Volume 19 Issue 6 Pages 495-499
    Published: June 20, 2010
    Released: June 02, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2010 Volume 19 Issue 6 Pages 499-
    Published: June 20, 2010
    Released: June 02, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2010 Volume 19 Issue 6 Pages 500-
    Published: June 20, 2010
    Released: June 02, 2017
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    Download PDF (127K)
  • Type: Appendix
    2010 Volume 19 Issue 6 Pages 500-
    Published: June 20, 2010
    Released: June 02, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (127K)
  • Type: Cover
    2010 Volume 19 Issue 6 Pages Cover27-
    Published: June 20, 2010
    Released: June 02, 2017
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