Journal of Epidemiology
Online ISSN : 1349-9092
Print ISSN : 0917-5040
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Volume 13 , Issue 1sup
Showing 1-14 articles out of 14 articles from the selected issue
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  • Shoichiro Tsugane, Satoshi Sasaki, Minatsu Kobayashi, Yoshitaka Tsubon ...
    Volume 13 (2003) Issue 1sup Pages 2-12
    Released: November 30, 2007
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Two kinds of food frequency questionnaire (FFQ)s were used in the baseline and 5-year follow-up survey of the Japan Public Health Center-based prospective Study on Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases (JPHC Study Cohort 1), a prospective follow-up study with 50, 000 population. The former (FF000) was a 44-item FFQ without standard portions/units and the latter (FFQ05) was a 138-item FFQ with standard portions/units. To validate these FFQs, a 7-day dietary record (DR) survey with blood and urine collection was conducted in four seasons in the Ninohe (Iwate), Yokote (Akita) and Saku (Nagano) Public Health Center (PHC) areas, and in two seasons in the Ishikawa (Okinawa) PHC area. Another FFQ00 and FFQ05 have also been employed at a one-year interval to measure repro- ducibility. A total of 102 men and 113 women provided complete 28-day DRs (14 days for Okinawa) and then filled out both FFQs after three or six months. A total of 92 men and 104 women provided blood twice, and 37 men and 65 women provided 24-hour urine twice. The data from these surveys have been used to measure the validity and reproducibility of the estimated food groups and nutrient intake by each FFQ.
    J Epidemiol2003;13(Supple):S2-S12.
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  • Satoshi Sasaki, Minatsu Kobayashi, Junko Ishihara, Shoichiro Tsugane
    Volume 13 (2003) Issue 1sup Pages 13-22
    Released: November 30, 2007
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    In this section we described the structure of the self-administered semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire used in the 5-year follow-up survey of the JPHC study, the computation algorithms, and the area-based mean intakes of nutrients and food groups in the subjects of the validation study. The FFQ consists of five sections: 1) semiquantitative frequency questions for rice and miso (fermented soybean paste)-soup, 2) those for alcoholic beverages, 3) those for vitamin supplements, 4) those for foods and beverages, and 5) questions on dietary and cooking behaviors. From the questions, intakes of nutrients and foods by food groups were computed. Although most of them were computed from the frequency and relative portion size indicated in the replies, together with the fixed portion size, a seasonal coefficient was added in the computation of vegetables and fruits. Only frequency of intake and fixed portion size were used for computation of beverages. Sugar and cream added in coffee and tea were computed from the frequency of coffee and tea intake. The intakes of cooking oil, cooking salt (sodium), and salt in noodle-soup were estimated from the questions of relative preference of oil, salt, and noodle-soup.
    J Epidemiol2003;13(Suppl):S13-S22.
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  • Satoshi Sasaki, Tosei Takahashi, Yoji Iitoi, Yasuhiko Iwase, Minatsu K ...
    Volume 13 (2003) Issue 1sup Pages 23-50
    Released: November 30, 2007
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    We present here the survey methods and basic results of dietary records which were used as reference values in the present validation study of a self-administered food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) for the 5-year follow-up survey of the JPHC study. A semi-weighed dietary record was kept for four seven consecutive days in each of the four seasons in 3 areas, i.e., Iwate, Akita, and Nagano, and for seven consecutive days in both winter and summer in Okinawa. The mean intakes were significantly different between areas for some nutrients and food groups. A significant seasonal difference in the mean intakes was also observed in some nutrients such as carotene and vitamin C, and in some food groups such as potatoes, vegetables, and fruits in both sexes, and alcoholic beverages in men and milks in women (p<0.001).
    J Epidemiol 2003; 13(suppl):S23-S50.
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  • Shoichiro Tsugane, Minatsu Kobayashi, Satoshi Sasaki
    Volume 13 (2003) Issue 1sup Pages 51-56
    Released: November 30, 2007
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    We examined the validity of energy and 16 nutrient intake measurements from a self-administered food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) used in the 5-year follow-up survey of the JPHC study using 28- or 14-day dietary records (DR) as the gold standard. The median (range) correlation coefficients between 16 nutrients measured by FFQ and DR were 0.52 (0.31-0.81) for men and 0.41 (0.22-0.56) for women. The median (range) for energy-adjusted correlation coefficients was 0.40 (0.22-0.82) for men and 0.39 (0.15-0.48) for women. With further adjustment for area, it was 0.41 and 0.35, respectively. The mean percentage of classification into the same categories between the two methods was 33% in men and 30% in women. Only 2% of subjects were classified into the extreme opposite categories. In conclu- sion, the results suggest that the FFQ can be used in the JPHC Study Cohort I to rank individuals according to the intakes for most of the nutrients examined.
    J Epidemiol 2003;1 3(Suppl):S51 -S56.
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  • Satoshi Sasaki, Minatsu Kobayashi, Shoichiro Tsugane
    Volume 13 (2003) Issue 1sup Pages 57-63
    Released: November 30, 2007
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    We examined the validity of food intake measurements from a self-administered food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) used in the 5-year follow-up survey of the JPHC study using 28- or 14-day dietary records (DR) as the gold standard. The median (range) correlation coefficients between a 19-food group measured by FFQ and DR were 0.42 (0.13-0.76) for men and 0.41 (0.02-0.75) for women. The median (range) for energy-adjusted correlation coefficients was 0.38 (0.08-0.76) for men and 0.32 (0.06-0.66) for women. The mean percentage of classification into the same categories between the two methods was 30% in men and 31 % in women. Only 2% in men and 3% in women of subjects were classified into the extreme opposite categories. When we adjusted for area, the median correlation coefficients were decreased in crude intakes (0.34 in men and 0.28 in women), whereas no remarkable change was observed in energy-adjusted intakes (0.33 in men and 0.29 in women). In conclusion, the results suggest that the FF0 can be used in the JPHC study cohort I to rank individuals according to the intakes for most of the food groups examined. But intake levels both at population and individual levels were difficult to estimate.
    J Epidemiol 2003; 13(suppl):S57-S63.
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  • Minatsu Kobayashi, Satoshi Sasaki, Terue Kawabata, Kyoko Hasegawa, Sho ...
    Volume 13 (2003) Issue 1sup Pages 64-81
    Released: November 30, 2007
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    We compared fatty acid intake estimated from our 138-item food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) with 28-day weighed dietary records among a subgroup of JPHC Study Cohort 1 (102 men and 113 women), and with the corresponding two serum phospholipid levels (88 men). Spearman rank correlation coeffi- cients between fatty acid intakes estimated from FFQ and intakes estimated from DR were as follows: saturated fatty acid, r=0.61 and r=0.60; monounsaturated fatty acid, r=0.50 and r=0.44; for energy adjusted value and Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), r=0.62 and r=0.55; docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), r=0.61 and r=0.50; for percentage of total fatty acid intake in men and women, respectively. Spearman rank correlation coefficients between fatty acid intakes estimated from FFQ and the corresponding serum phospholipid levels (% of total fatty acid) were as follows: EPA, r=0.43 and r=0.59; DHA, r=0.35 and r=0.49; for crude value (g/day) and percentage of total fatty acid intake, respectively. In conclusion, relatively high correlations were observed for SFA, MUFA and marine-origin n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, whereas we must take into account the indicator of each fatty acid intake when using the data of fatty acid intake assessed with FFQ for JPHC study.
    J Epidemiol 2003;13(Suppl):S64-S81.
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  • Minatsu Kobayashi, Satoshi Sasaki, Shoichiro Tsugane
    Volume 13 (2003) Issue 1sup Pages 82-91
    Released: November 30, 2007
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    We compared carotene and vitamin C intake assessed with our 138-item food frequency question- naire (FFQ) against 28-day weighed dietary records among a subgroup of JPHC Study Cohort 1 (102 men and 113 women), and the corresponding serum carotenoid levels or plasma vitamin C levels (86 men and 100 women). Correlation coefficients between carotenoids or vitamin C intake estimated from FFQ and intakes estimated from DR were as follows in men and women, respectively: alpha-carotene, r=0.47 and r=0.46; beta-carotene, r=0.40 and r=0.30; lycopene, r=0.18 and r=0.22; vitamin C, r=0.44 and r=0.31. Correlation coefficients between carotenoids or vitamin C intake estimated from FFQ and the corresponding serum carotenoids levels or plasma vitamin C levels were as follows: alpha- carotene, r=0.38 and r=0.30; beta-carotene, r=0.28 and r=0.11; lycopene, r=0.30 and r=0.19; vitamin C, r=-0.07 and r=0.06; in men and women, respectively. These data indicated carotenoid and vitamin C intakes estimated from FFQ were associated with intake from DR, although the association was weak for lycopene. Carotenoid intake estimated from FFQ were associated with corresponding serum carotenoid levels in men, but the correlation was weak in women except for alpha-carotene. Both in men and women, no association was observed for plasma vitamin C levels.
    J Epidemiol 2003;1 3(Suppl):S82-S91.
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  • Kanae Karita, Satoshi Sasaki, Junko Ishihara, Shoichiro Tsugane
    Volume 13 (2003) Issue 1sup Pages 92-97
    Released: November 30, 2007
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Selenium (Se) levels in serum and erythrocytes were measured in 215 adults to assess the relative validity of Se intake estimated from 28-day dietary records (DR) and the food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) used in the 5-year follow-up survey of the JPHC study. Se intake estimated from DR was correlated with that from the FFQ both in males and females (r=0.36 and r=0.32, respectively). Se levels in erythrocytes were weakly correlated with Se intake by DR for men (r=0.21) after adjustments for the total energy intake, though no significant correlation was found for women nor in crude values for either sex. Although Se intake estimated from our FFQ was correlated with that from the DR, no correlation was observed between the Se level in serum and estimated Se intake. In this population, the serum Se level was not a good biomarker for estimated Se intake.
    J Epidemiol 2003;1 3(Suppl);S92-S97.
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  • Hiroyasu Iso, Yuri Moriyama, Kaori Yoshino, Satoshi Sasaki, Junko Ishi ...
    Volume 13 (2003) Issue 1sup Pages 98-101
    Released: November 30, 2007
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    To validate a self-administered food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) for the estimation of dietary intake of folate, vitamins B6 and B12, we compared measures of these vitamins by the FFQ and plasma concentrations among 87 male volunteers aged 40-69 years in the Japan Public Health Center-based prospective study (JPHC Study). No men used folate, vitamins B6 or B12 as supplements. There was a moderate association between energy-adjusted dietary intake and plasma concentration for folate and vitamin Bs. The Spearman correlation coefficient was 0.26 and 0.23, respectively, in the total samples. These correlation coefficients were slightly higher when men in the Ishikawa PHC area were excluded from the analysis; the correlation coefficient was 0.29 for folate and 0.26 for vitamin B6. No significant correlation was found between dietary vitamin B12 intake and serum B12 concentration; the correlation coefficient was 0.06 in the total sample and 0.15 when the Ishikawa men were excluded from the analysis. In conclusion, we found that the FFQ used for the 5-year follow-up survey of JPHC Study could reasonably rank individuals by dietary intake of folate and vitamin Bs, but not vitamin B12, among Japanese community-dwelling population samples.
    J Epidemiol2003;13(Suppl):S98-S101.
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  • Satoshi Sasaki, Junko Ishihara, Shoichiro Tsugane
    Volume 13 (2003) Issue 1sup Pages 102-105
    Released: November 30, 2007
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    We compared the intake levels of sodium and potassium assessed with a self-administered semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) used in a 5-year follow-up survey of the JPHC study and 28-day dietary record (DR), and the corresponding two 24-hour urinary excretion levels (32 men and 57 women) in 3-areas, i.e., Ninohe, Yokote, and Saku Public Health Center areas. The Spearman rank correlation coefficients between dietary sodium assessed with FFQ and the urinary excretion for crude values were 0.24 and -0.10 in men and women, respectively. After adjusting for energy and crea- tinine, the sodium correlation coefficients were 0.35 and 0.25 in men and women, respectively. The correlation coefficients for crude potassium values were 0.18 and -0.13 in men and women, respectively. After adjusting for energy and creatinine, the potassium correlation coefficients were 0.48 and 0.18 in men and women, respectively In conclusion, a weak correlation was observed both for sodium and potassium after energy and creatinine adjustment in men, whereas no meaningful correlation was observed in women.
    J Epidemiol2003;13(Suppl):S102-Sl05.
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  • Satoshi Sasaki, Yasuhiro Matsumura, Junko Ishihara, Shoichiro Tsugane
    Volume 13 (2003) Issue 1sup Pages 106-114
    Released: November 30, 2007
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    We examined the validity of a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) used in the 5-year follow-up survey of the JPHC study for estimation of dietary fiber intake by comparing the intake estimated with dietary records (DR). We developed a food composition table for dietary fiber for the food items included in the FFQ using a substitution method. The Spearman correlation coefficients were slightly higher in crude values (0.48-0.51 in men, 0.40-0.45 in women) than in energy-adjusted values (0.43-0.44 in men, 0.36-0.40 in women). The correlation coefficients of food group-specific dietary fiber (crude) were 0.26 and 0.27 for vegetables, and 0.62 and 0.49 for fruits in men and women, respectively. The mean intakes assessed with the FFQ and DR were not statistically different either for water-soluble or-insoluble fiber in both men and women. However, the fruit fiber assessed with FFQ was significantly over- and the vegetable fiber was underestimated compared with those assessed with DRs. The FFQ can be used for ranking individuals for dietary fiber intakes in epidemiologic studies, despite the difficulty in estimating mean intake.
    J Epidemiol 2003; 13(Suppi):S106-S114.
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  • Satoshi Sasaki, Junko Ishihara, Shoichiro Tsugane
    Volume 13 (2003) Issue 1sup Pages 115-124
    Released: November 30, 2007
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    We examined the reproducibility of a self-administered semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) used in the 5-year follow-up survey for the Japan Public Health Center-based prospective Study on cancer and cardiovascular diseases (JPHC Study) to estimate nutrient and food intake by using repeated FFQs at a 1-year interval in 101 men and 108 women. Between energy and each of 32 nutrients, the correlation coefficients in crude values varied from 0.41 for vitamin B12 to 0.83 for alcohol (median=0.59) in men and 0.52 for alpha-carotene to 0.77 for iron (median=0.67) in women. In 21 food groups, it varied from 0.42 for seasonings and spices to 0.80 for pickled vegetables (median=0.61) in men and 0.45 for seasonings and spices and 0.74 for pulses, milks, and pickled vegetables (median=0.63) in women. The correlation coefficients for the energy-adjusted values (medians were 0.49 and 0.50 for nutrients and 0.50 and 0.49 for food groups in men and women, respectively) were somewhat lower than for the crude values. The difference in mean intakes between the two FFQs was less than 10% in most of the nutrient and food groups. The results suggest that the reproducibility of the FFQ used for the JPHC study was moderate to high in most of the nutrient and food groups.
    J Epidemiol 2003;13(Suppi):S115-S124.
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  • Yoshitaka Tsubono, Minatsu Kobayashi, Satoshi Sasaki, Shoichiro Tsugan ...
    Volume 13 (2003) Issue 1sup Pages 125-133
    Released: November 30, 2007
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    We examined the validity and reproducibility of a 44-item food frequency questionnaire used in a baseline survey of the Japan Public Health Center-Based Prospective Study Cohort I conducted in February 1990. Subjects were 94 men and 107 women selected on a voluntary basis among respondents to the baseline survey. Four or five years after the baseline survey, they provided four 7-day diet records during a 1-year period, and then responded to the same questionnaire a second time. The median (range) for energy-adjusted correlation coefficients between 30 nutrients measured by the questionnaire and the diet records was 0.36 (0.06-0.81) for men and 0.37 (0.11-0.52) for women. The median correlation (range) for 17 food groups was 0.30 (0.08-0.75) for men and 0.28 (0.08-0.46) for women. The median correlation (range) for energy-adjusted correlation coefficients between the two questionnaires was 0.24 (0.04-0.69) for men and 0.50 (0.27-0.60) for women for the nutrients, and 0.34 (0.15-0.63) for men and 0.48 (0.18-0.55) for women for the food groups, respectively. The results indicate that this brief food frequency questionnaire provides reasonably valid and reproducible measures of consumption for many nutrients and food groups, and is useful for examining the association between diet and health in the Japanese population.
    J Epidemioil2003;13(Suppl):S125-S133.
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  • Junko Ishihara, Tomotaka Sobue, Seiichiro Yamamoto, Itsuro Yoshimi, Sa ...
    Volume 13 (2003) Issue 1sup Pages 134-147
    Released: November 30, 2007
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The objective of this study was to evaluate the validity and reproducibility of a self-administered food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) to estimate nutrient and food intake in the subjects of the Japan Public Health Center-based prospective Study on Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases (JPHC Study Cohort II). The FFQ was originally developed to estimate intake in the JPHC Study Cohort I. A total of 392 sub-jects were recruited from the entire cohort participants in the 6 areas of Cohort II on a voluntary basis. The subjects completed the FFQ used for the 5-year follow-up survey twice at approximately a 1-year interval. Seven-day dietary records (DR) and blood samples were collected 4 times at 3-month intervals over a year. Daily nutrient and food intakes from FFQ and DR were estimated. The Spearman correlation coefficients for estimated intakes were calculated between FFQ and DR for validity, and between 2 identical FFQs for reproducibility. Correlation coefficients for the validity ranged from 0.09 to 0.82 among various nutrients and food groups. The correlation coefficients for most of the nutrients and food groups were improved to a level comparable to that of Cohort I by energy-adjustment. Correlation coefficients for reproducibility ranged from 0.42 to 0.82, similar to those of Cohort I.
    J Epidemiol 2003;13(Suppl):S134-S147.
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