Journal of Epidemiology
Online ISSN : 1349-9092
Print ISSN : 0917-5040
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Volume 14 , Issue Supplement_I
Showing 1-7 articles out of 7 articles from the selected issue
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Lyfestyle and Mortality in the Miyagi Cohort Study
Original Article
  • Ichiro Tsuji, Yoshikazu Nishino, Yoshitaka Tsubono, Yoshinori Suzuki, ...
    Type: Others
    Subject area: Others
    Volume 14 (2004) Issue Supplement_I Pages S2-S6
    Released: March 18, 2005
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    BACKGROUND: Findings from a large-scale population-based prospective cohort would lead us to better understanding of the relationship between lifestyle and health, thus better provision of strategies for disease prevention and health promotion.
    METHODS: We conducted a baseline survey with two self-administered questionnaires regarding lifestyle and personality on the residents aged 40 to 64 years in 14 municipalities of Miyagi Prefecture, Japan, during June through August, 1990. Out of the eligible 51,925 residents, 47,605 (91.7%) responded to the lifestyle questionnaire and formed the cohort under study. We then have been following up the subjects for mortality, migration, and incidence of cancer.
    RESULTS: During the follow-up from June 1990 through March 2001, 2,536 subjects (5.3%) died and 2,166 subjects (4.5%) emigrated. The distribution of the causes of death among the study subjects was quite consistent with the national average.
    CONCLUSIONS: In this cohort study, both the participation rate and the follow-up rate are satisfactorily high. We expect this Miyagi Cohort Study to provide the society with evidence for health promotion and disease prevention.
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  • Yoshikazu Nishino, Yoshinori Suzuki, Kaori Ohmori, Atsushi Hozawa, Kei ...
    Type: Others
    Subject area: Others
    Volume 14 (2004) Issue Supplement_I Pages S7-S11
    Released: March 18, 2005
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    BACKGROUND: There were few prospective cohort studies in Japan using cancer incidence as an endpoint.
    METHODS: We conducted a baseline survey with two self-administered questionnaires regarding lifestyle and personality on the residents aged 40 to 64 years in 14 municipalities of Miyagi Prefecture, Japan, during June through August, 1990. Out of the eligible 51,921 residents, 47,605 (91.7%) responded to the lifestyle questionnaire and formed the cohort under study. We collated the list of subjects in the cohort with the Miyagi Prefectural Cancer Registry data through December 31, 1997. To identify the same person between two data, we used four personal characteristics (sex, name, birthday, and municipality of dwelling).
    RESULTS: We ascertained 1,718 cases of incident cancer. In men, gastric cancer was the leading site of cancer (27.7%), followed by lung cancer and colon cancer. In women, breast cancer was the most common (19.6%), followed by gastric cancer and colon cancer.
    CONCLUSIONS: By record linkage with regional cancer registry data, it becomes possible for us to investigate the effect of various life-styles on cancer incidence in the Miyagi Cohort Study. We expect this data to contribute to the progress of research on cancer etiology and cancer prevention.
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  • Atsushi Hozawa, Takayoshi Ohkubo, Junko Yamaguchi, Takashi Ugajin, Yay ...
    Type: Others
    Subject area: Others
    Volume 14 (2004) Issue Supplement_I Pages S12-S17
    Released: March 18, 2005
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    BACKGROUND: We examined the association between smoking and all-cause mortality among Japanese men and women.
    METHODS: In 1990, 18,945 men and 17,107 women in Miyagi Prefecture in rural northern Japan (40-64 year of age) completed a self-administered questionnaire including items on smoking. Cox regression was used to estimate relative risk (RR) of mortality according to smoking categories, with adjustment for age, education, marital status, past history of diseases, drinking, body mass index, walking, and dietary variables. During 11 years of follow-up, 1,209 men and 499 women had died.
    RESULTS: Multivariate RRs of all-cause mortality for current smokers as compared with never smokers were 1.71 (95% confidence interval, 1.44-2.03) for men and 1.44 (95% confidence interval, 1.06-1.94) for women. Among men, risk in past smokers who had quit smoking for 15 years or longer was not different from the risk in never smokers (RR, 0.97; 95% confidence interval, 0.68-1.39). Of all deaths, 34% in men and 4% in women were attributable to current or past smoking.
    CONCLUSIONS: This study indicates that smoking increases the risk of premature death among middle-aged Japanese men and women and that substantial proportion of death, especially for men, is attributable to smoking.
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  • Naoki Nakaya, Kayoko Kurashima, Junko Yamaguchi, Takayoshi Ohkubo, Yos ...
    Type: Others
    Subject area: Others
    Volume 14 (2004) Issue Supplement_I Pages S18-S25
    Released: March 18, 2005
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    BACKGROUND: We examined the association between alcohol consumption and all-cause mortality in Japanese men and women.
    METHODS: From June through August 1990, a total of 39,076 subjects (20,660 men and 18,416 women) in 14 municipalities of Miyagi Prefecture in rural northern Japan (40-64 years of age) completed a self-administered questionnaire that included information about alcohol consumption and various health habits. During 11 years of follow-up, we identified 1,879 deaths (1,335 men and 544 women). We used Cox proportional-hazards regression to estimate relative risk (RR) of all-cause mortality according to categories of alcohol consumption and to adjust for age, education, marital status, past histories of chronic diseases, body mass index, smoking, walking and dietary variables.
    RESULTS: Among men, the risk for all-cause mortality was significantly higher in past drinkers than never-drinkers (multivariate RR, 1.86; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.50-2.29). There was a dose-response association between alcohol consumption and the risk of all-cause mortality among current drinking men: multivariate RRs in reference to never-drinkers (95% CI) were 1.10 (0.90-1.33), 1.17 (0.96-1.42), 1.16 (0.96-1.40), and 1.62 (1.32-1.99) in current drinkers who consumed less than 22.8 g, 22.8-45.5 g, 45.6-68.3 g, and 68.4 g or more alcohol per day, respectively (P for trend<0.001). Similar association was observed among women (P for trend=0.005).
    CONCLUSIONS: The results indicated that alcohol consumption tended to be associated with linear increase in risk of all-cause mortality among Japanese men and women, and the association was remarkable for younger men.
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  • Kazuki Fujita, Hideko Takahashi, Chihaya Miura, Takayoshi Ohkubo, Yuki ...
    Type: Others
    Subject area: Others
    Volume 14 (2004) Issue Supplement_I Pages S26-S32
    Released: March 18, 2005
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    BACKGROUND: Although many studies in western populations demonstrated that time spent walking was associated with a reduced risk of all-cause mortality, data on Japanese has been sparse.
    METHODS: In 1990, 20,004 men and 21,159 women in Miyagi Prefecture in rural northern Japan (40-64 year of age) completed a self-administered questionnaire including a question on time spent walking. Cox regression was used to estimate relative risk (RR) of mortality according to three levels of walking (30 minutes or less, between 30 minutes and one hour, and one hour or more), with adjustment for age, education, marital status, past history of diseases, smoking, drinking, body mass index, and dietary variables. During 11 years of follow-up, 1,879 subjects had died.
    RESULTS: Time spent walking was inversely associated with risk of all-cause mortality: compared with men and women who walked one hour or more per day, multivariate RR (95% confidence intervals) was 1.06 (0.95-1.19) for subjects who walked between 30 minutes and one hour per day, and 1.16 (1.04-1.29) for subjects who walked 30 minutes or less per day (P for trend=0.007). Shorter duration of walking was associated with increased mortality among men who were never smokers (P for trend=0.081) and past smokers (P for trend=0.026), but not among currently smoking men (P for trend=0.751). We observed similar effect modification for women.
    CONCLUSIONS: Time spent walking was associated with a reduced risk for all-cause mortality, especially among nonsmoking men and women.
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  • Shinichi Kuriyama, Kaori Ohmori, Chihaya Miura, Yoko Suzuki, Naoki Nak ...
    Type: Others
    Subject area: Others
    Volume 14 (2004) Issue Supplement_I Pages S33-S38
    Released: March 18, 2005
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    BACKGROUND: The relation between body mass index (BMI) and mortality is not well established. The objective of this study was to examine the association in Japanese adults.
    METHODS: In 1990, 18,740 men and 20,870 women in Miyagi Prefecture in rural northern Japan (40-64 years of age) completed a self-administered questionnaire including height and weight. Cox regression was used to estimate relative risk (RR) of mortality according to levels of BMI, with adjustment for age, marital status, smoking, drinking, walking, and weight change since 20 years of age.
    RESULTS: During 11 years of follow-up, 1,121 men and 567 women had died. Compared with the referent BMI category (23.0-24.9), women in the highest BMI category (BMI>30.0) had a RR of death of 1.64 (95% confidence interval (CI), 1.09-2.49) and men and women in the lowest BMI categories (BMI<18.5) had a RR of death of 2.06 (95% CI, 1.49-2.84) and 1.83 (95% CI, 1.17-2.88), respectively, after adjustment for potential confounders and after exclusion of deaths occurring in the first three years of follow-up. We did not observe significant differences in mortality for subjects with wide range of BMI (18.5 or higher in men and 18.5 to 29.9 in women).
    CONCLUSIONS: The risk of death from all causes increases in lean men and women, and obese women in this cohort.
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  • Yoshitaka Tsubono, Yayoi Koizumi, Naoki Nakaya, Kazuki Fujita, Hideko ...
    Type: Others
    Subject area: Others
    Volume 14 (2004) Issue Supplement_I Pages S39-S45
    Released: March 18, 2005
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    BACKGROUND: Evidence is limited regarding the association between the combinations of multiple health practices and mortality.
    METHODS: In 1990, 28,333 men and women in Miyagi Prefecture in rural northern Japan (40-64 year of age) completed a self-administered questionnaire. A lifestyle score was calculated by adding the number of high-risk practices (smoking, consuming ≥22.8 g alcohol/d, walking <1 hr/d, body mass index <18.5 or ≥30.0). Cox regression was used to estimate relative risk (RR) of mortality according to the lifestyle score, with adjustment for age, education, marital status, past history of diseases, and dietary variables. During 11 years of follow-up, 1,200 subjects had died.
    RESULTS: We observed linear increase in risk of death associated with increasing number of high-risk practices: compared with men who had no high-risk practices, multivariate RRs for men who had 1 to 4 practices were 1.20, 1.66, 1.94, and 3.96, respectively (P for trend<0.001), and corresponding RRs for women were 1.31, 2.14, 3.98, 5.56, respectively (P for trend<0.001). A unit increase in the number of high-risk practices corresponded to being 2.8 and 4.8 years older for men and women, respectively.
    CONCLUSONS: In this prospective cohort study of middle-aged men and women in rural Japan, a larger number of high-risk practices was associated with linear increase in risk of all-cause mortality.
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